Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-05-08, 05:40 PM   #1
Tio
Peddler of the cycle
Thread Starter
 
Tio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Bikes: 1998 Serotta Legend (Dura Ace), 2007 Merlin Cyrene (Dura Ace/Ultegra mix)
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cantilever v. Disk on my new build

Hey folk, I need a bit of guidance; I am getting a gem of a deal on a Lynskey Pro Cross & I have a bit of a dilemma with the braking options. The bike was original built up for one of the wrenches at my LBS and it didn't come to the specs that he wanted (very auspicious for me, as he and I are almost anatomical twins & I was in the market).

This said, he had it built up for disk brakes and I would like to use this bike for more than simply CX purposes (i.e., my hierarchy of needs are as such: 1) Commuting/Winter (the former set up as a roadie); 2) Cross riding; & 3) Back-up roadie when my road bike goes to the LBS hospital.

As such, here are my options: 1) Keep the disk break option; 2) Go disk only on the back and go cantilever up front; or 3) send it back to TN and have them weld on some mounts.

Other than the modest weight penalty, is there any reason that I should scrap the disks? Also, will switching out wheels set up on my roadie (when I am lazy and/or when I want some faster shoes on my cross bike) work with the disks set-up?

Any thoughts and or advice are appreciated.
Tio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-08, 05:44 PM   #2
markhr
POWERCRANK addict
 
markhr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: North Acton, West London, UK
Bikes:
Posts: 3,783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tio View Post
...is there any reason that I should scrap the disks? Also, will switching out wheels set up on my roadie (when I am lazy and/or when I want some faster shoes on my cross bike) work with the disks set-up?...
No, that is, unless you plan to race under international (UCIdiots) rules CX.

Wheel changes are easier and quicker with disc brakes as you don't have to either fiddle with cable hangers or adjust for different rim and tyre widths.

edit: ...and you'll save yourself a bunch of money with disc brakes as you won't have to worry about rim wear and which compund pads to use.
__________________
shameless POWERCRANK plug
Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!

Last edited by markhr; 04-06-08 at 08:38 PM.
markhr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-08, 07:10 PM   #3
M_S
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 3,693
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you want to swap back and forth wheelsets with your other bikes discs are a no go. Personally I think a disc in back is your worst option. It's extra weight and the rear isn't where you need the extra power.

I'd consider doing disc up front and canti in back. That way you can use rear wheels from other bikes, because the rear is most likely to get messe dup and need to be swapped out, and then you can use a disc up front where you'l realy appreciate the superior braking power.

Another option would be to have two sets of brakes and and wheels, assuming your disc wheels can't take rim brakes. Expensive, but you could put the cantis on during race season and use the discs the rest of the year.
M_S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-08, 11:18 PM   #4
ultraman6970
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 7,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi...

I'm not an expert in CX but im re-building a comuter bike with campy stuff and i got stuck in the dics or cantilver dilemma also. Well, what ms is saying is right in my opinion but happen that Cane Creek has a set of wheels that are disc and cantilever compatibles. U can use them with both brake systems.

Doing my homework i found that the darn discs hubs costs a fortune and the cheapest way to do it at least for me was getting a set of Cane Creek Strados discs. Those wheels are on sale right now for 275 bucks shipping included. A set of Shimano hubs goes for that much plus the spokes and the rims, u endup paying around 500 anyways. Even Formula discs hubs are about 200 bucks the set, plus shipping and stuff... The strados are a bargain for 275 bucks besides they look awesome, and the creek costumer service its outstanding anyways, thing that personally I can't say from many manufacturers and retailers.

Good luck.

ps: anybody know where i can get a cheap set of bb7s???
ultraman6970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-08, 05:35 AM   #5
jhota
blithering idiot
 
jhota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: beautiful coastal South Carolina
Bikes: 1991 Trek 930, 2005 Bianchi Eros, 2006 Nashbar "X," IRO Rob Roy
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
stay disc. for what you seem to want to use the bike for, they're definitely better.

commuting/winter riding? no contest. they're immune to the issues rim brakes have with picking up scum from the road, it's cheaper to replace a disc than a rim when they get eaten up with road debris, etc.

swapping wheels with the road bike won't work, though. not just because of the disc brake issue. the Lynskey Pro Cross has 135mm dropout spacing. which means your road hub's going to be too narrow.

i'd suggest putting the money you'd spend on having the frame modified to accept rim brakes and purchasing a new brakeset towards a second disc wheelset. they're not overly expensive.
jhota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-08, 01:02 PM   #6
wrongdave
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you plan on mounting a rear rack (to use for commuting), discs can be a problem since some racks don't play nice with the rear caliper. Other than that, I say keep the discs.
wrongdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:53 AM.