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Old 07-09-08, 11:50 PM   #1
fakemoonlanding
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Carbon Cyclo Fork

My old fork is quite rusted so its time for a new one, and given how reliable my bike has been over the last few years, I'm thinking about getting a fork with some eyelets for a rack.
Any suggestions (with links please?) for a carbon fork (preferably) with eyelets fit for a rack.
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Old 07-10-08, 10:55 AM   #2
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Ritchey Comp Carbon Cross

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Old 07-10-08, 11:17 AM   #3
fakemoonlanding
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Forgot to mention, I'm using Caliper Brakes (older Shimano 105s). I guess that's the hardest part because I'm pretty sure that fork is for linear pull brakes.

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Old 07-10-08, 12:25 PM   #4
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this would really be a better question for the touring or commuting forums.

the eyelets for a standard front rack are located in the middle of the fork blade. there are very few carbon forks out there that contain these eyelets, presumably because they involve a substantial altering of the carbon weave in a place where you need strength.

what is the reasoning behind wanting carbon? it's typically used on lightweight bikes, where a pound or two makes a noticeable difference. putting a rack and bags on there negates any possible weight savings.

if you want a front rack, you're much better off with steel imo. there are racks that can attach to cantilever mounts and quick release skewers like this one, but i think you'd be better off deciding what you want this fork to do. if you want light and fast, carbon is good. if you want strengh and reliability, you can't beat steel. if you want the best of both worlds, you might consider getting one of each and learning how to switch them out.

but again, the touring and commuting forums would probably know more.
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Old 07-10-08, 12:47 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtyphotons View Post
this would really be a better question for the touring or commuting forums.

the eyelets for a standard front rack are located in the middle of the fork blade. there are very few carbon forks out there that contain these eyelets, presumably because they involve a substantial altering of the carbon weave in a place where you need strength.
I think you mean the "braze-ons"

Eyelets are like the Ritchey Carbon Comp Cross, down by the fork ends, and are good for mounting fenders or racks. Not all racks need the braze-ons, too, but lowriders do, though I've seen people make do with p-clamps.

I do think there is a carbon fork with braze-ons, though.

For many front racks you don't need eyelets OR braze-ons, though, some just mounting through the caliper hole and posting on the fork legs themselves, others even utilizing the canti posts.

fakemoonlanding, though the Ritchey pictured has canti posts, it also has a caliper mount if you want to use your 105 brakes. It'll look a bit funny, but it will work.

When considering the difference between a cross and road fork you're mostly looking at length and overal beefiness. the Ritchey is 395 mm long, which is long for a road fork. Do you have a road or a cx fork already? What is the length? You sure don't want to mess up well-fitting geometry!
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