Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How to build a CX bike? - Newbie

    Decided I want to try cyclocross. I have only seen a couple fo cross bikes in my life.

    1. I am going to be looking for a stiff frame (small cyldesdale), suggestions appreciated. Price range 0-750

    2. What parts are typically from road vs mtn bikes? This leads to the next parts of the question: what parts can I liberate from my collection of bikes I don't really ride much anymore to build it. I have a full 8 speed XT-R gruppo , which parts should I use from this etc? Should I rebuild the XT-R hubs with a 700c rim? If so, which rims are great values (Can't afford nor do I really need 404s or something as a noob)?

    Sorry for the tons of questions in no particular order.

    Thanks for helping the cross noob. Oh any youtube videos I should watch for methods or tips?


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nobody

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    135
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you plan on racing and taking it semi-serious you probably want to use some sort of Brifter (Brake-Shifter combo) which would preclude the use of your existing 8 speed stuff. Honestly, your best bet is a complete bike from one of the bargain places, BikesDirect or Performance. . Or if you have the money go for something from one of the better manufacturers like Redline , Felt, Kona etc. You always get way more for your money with a complete bike.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks. Is sizing the same? I ride a 58 on the road, do I look for a 58 or do I want it smaller for hopping off easier...Thx again.
    Last edited by Meek; 10-04-08 at 07:15 AM.

  5. #5
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Windy City
    My Bikes
    A road bike for every purpose
    Posts
    8,913
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most CX frames have 130mm rear spacing and will require road hubs. A few, like the Nashbar X require 135 MTB hubs, 29er wheels work on these. Several steel frames are spaced at 132.5 and can take either hubs.

    I agree that buying a complete bike is both economical & foolproof.

    If you want to build your own, here are a few frames to consider;

    http://www.pakebikes.com/pakemute.html
    http://www.somafab.com/frames.html
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...slisearch=true
    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...Frames%2FBikes
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=380068920729
    http://www.bikeman.com/KON-F09JS58.html

    Michael
    2014 Trek DS.1: "Viaggiatore" A do-it-all bike that is waiting in Italy
    2012 Pedal Force CG2: "Secolo Bicicletta" the modern carbon fiber road bike
    2012 Pedal Force CX2: "Carbone CX" the carbon fiber CX bike
    2010 Origin 8 CX 700: "Servizio Grave" Monstercross/29er bike
    1997 Simoncini Special Cyclocross: "Little Simon" lugged Columbus steel CX bike
    1987 Serotta Nova Special X: "Azzurri" The retro Columbus SPX steel road bike

  6. #6
    Senior Member MONGO!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    4,279
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sizing is the same as you would be on a road bike, you can use a MTB front hub and rear derailleur, you'll need road brifters and compact crank (46/36T double is common).

    For rims Mavic Open Pro are a good choice.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    314
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I recommend the Surly Cross Check, the 2009 colors are great. I am loving mine, I am also a newbie and have raced only once on it - but it performed well.

    You could sell your existing bikes and pay for most of a new Surly.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    My Bikes
    Dawes Kalahari, Puch Prima Super Sport, Graham Weigh 853
    Posts
    1,990
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1. I am going to be looking for a stiff frame (small cyldesdale), suggestions appreciated. Price range 0-750

    - How about a Surly Cross Check? These are strong bikes. And cheap for the frame/fork.

    2. What parts are typically from road vs mtn bikes? This leads to the next parts of the question: what parts can I liberate from my collection of bikes I don't really ride much anymore to build it. I have a full 8 speed XT-R gruppo , which parts should I use from this etc? Should I rebuild the XT-R hubs with a 700c rim? If so, which rims are great values (Can't afford nor do I really need 404s or something as a noob)?

    - You can use all the XTR group with the possible exception of the front mech and the gear/brake levers (Obviously). Was XTR a canti group back then? You'll need travel agents for vees. Shimano Sora 8 speed levers will work fine for brake/shifting duties. Rebuild the hubs onto 700c rims. Open Pros will be fine, but Ambrosio Excellences will be cooler. You can almost always get mtb hubs into modern 130mm frames because it's only 2.5mm on either side. The hubs are tough and well suited to cross. So.. that just leave the front mech. You made need a pulley to convert the top pull cable to bottom pull for a roadie mech (Sora or Tiagra will be fine). Speak to your LBS/supplier about this.

    As for the chainset, you could whip one ring off and use it as a double, or just leave it as a triple, and ride past the guys who mocked you on the climb they all had to "run". Boom boom!
    Last edited by acorn_user; 10-04-08 at 12:02 PM. Reason: sp

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My cross bike has XT mountain bike hubs on 130 spacing. I just had to take out a bit of the outside spacers and file down the axle. I also use an XT rear derailleur. No problem.

    Many cross racers use only a single front chainring, and bar-end shifters. So, if you want to go cheap, get some Tektro single-speed brakes, one bar-end shifter and that'll cost 1/2 or less than a single brifter. Bar ends aren't as easy to use as brifters, but they're a lot more reliable - won't get gunked up by mud, survive crashes better.

  10. #10
    Senior Member bluenote157's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    DC
    My Bikes
    Surly CC, Raleigh Team Pro, Specialized Rockhopper
    Posts
    950
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yeah.. i want to try cx this season, so i built one up as well. Like you, I used an array of stuff I found in my parts bin. I used a first generation 105 rear derailleur (6speed) paired with a 9speed cassette, and 9speed indexed barcon. Probably not as easy to use as a brifter, but i would rather get better at crashing and not destroying an STI. I was considering using a trigger shifter somewhere on the tops.. but whatever???...we will see if that ever happens.

  11. #11
    anything but last rOOster14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Chagrin Falls, Ohio
    My Bikes
    Cannondale caad9 full duraace`, trek soho singlespeed...cross bike coming soon.
    Posts
    538
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MONGO! View Post
    Sizing is the same as you would be on a road bike, you can use a MTB front hub and rear derailleur, you'll need road brifters and compact crank (46/36T double is common).

    For rims Mavic Open Pro are a good choice.
    although a lot of geometry is a little different, in the frame im looking at (soma double cross) a 54 matches the geometry of my 56cm cannondale roadie.
    go to a shop that knows cyclocross and chat at them
    Roadie: Cannondale caad9
    Cross: Voodoo Limba, Rival/force
    Commuter: Trek Soho Singlespeed

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    135
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Cross Check is a great "cruiser" bike but if you are considering racing I'd look elsewhere. Similar amounts of money will get you an aluminum frame and carbon fork that are almost half the combined weight of the Cross Check frame and fork...that's a lot. No need for the extra weight when racing....or just riding but that's my opinion.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Going to various bike stores and demo-ing CX bikes. Most of these places never seem to have my relatively common size (58) in stock which makes it tough to tell how they really ride.

    Out of curiousity, is the Cross Check flexy? Last steel bike I rode had some crazy BB flex.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The cross check is a tank. Not flexy at all. That's the bonus of all that extra weight.

    I'm a clyde too (range between 250-265) and I ride a Gunnar. They use True Temper OX Platinum tubes, and use larger/thicker tubes for larger frames. Mine is sturdy and I've noticed no undue flex.

    I owned a Soma Rush and felt like I was riding a big spring, and could hear the chain and cog teeth grinding and popping when I was out of the saddle. So, I'd avoid a Soma Doublecross, as it's made from the same steel and/or tubes.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    314
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The bottom bracket area of my 62cm cross check is pretty flexible, but not cause a problem when riding.

  16. #16
    cs1
    cs1 is offline
    Senior Member cs1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Clev Oh
    My Bikes
    Specialized, Schwinn
    Posts
    6,189
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MONGO! View Post
    Sizing is the same as you would be on a road bike, you can use a MTB front hub and rear derailleur, you'll need road brifters and compact crank (46/36T double is common).

    For rims Mavic Open Pro are a good choice.
    Most mfg's I've talked to say go down a size. They say that a true cross bike has a higher BB. Thus, the seat tube is shorter. Say you have a 56cm ST and a 56cm TT in a road bike. Now, in a cross bike the mfg raises the BB 2cm the 56cm seat tube becomes a 54cm. The TT is the same 56cm and the standover height is the same. Only the ST measurement changes. So, if you buy a 56cm cross bike it's probably more like a 58cm road bike. WOW, I'm exhausted from so much typing. Hope it helps.
    1999 Waterford RSE-11, 1995 Waterford 1200, 1989 Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    1989 Raleigh Technium, 1989 Schwinn Traveler, 1986 Specialized Rockhopper
    1984 Specialized Stumpjumper, 1986 Specialized Stumpjumper and just way too many projects to list.

  17. #17
    Spoke busting fat guy
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Jefferson City, MO USA
    My Bikes
    07 Specialized Allez Elite "Quilt Bike"///06 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm a bit of a clyde at 225//6'2" and I race on a Specialized Tricross SS. It is absolutely my favorite bike. Very light and quick, climbs well, low maintenance, and just overall great bike. The only mods I made, since it is SS, is extra wide bars for extra leverage while climbing.

    Buy one and you will love it. And they're cheap, mine was only $650+tax.

    Nothing ventured....nothing sprained.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •