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  1. #1
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    do you need this on your bike and what is the word for it?

    I bought a Bianchi Volpe a few days ago and I just noticed the piece of plastic between my rear wheel and the gears (I guess it keeps the chain from getting into the spokes if shifting would go wrong) is missing. When I bought the bike it was there but when I came home last night after riding it on a really bad road in the city I noticed it was gone. Is it possible that it falls out and do you really need that piece of plastic? Also, is there a word for that piece of plastic?

  2. #2
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    It is officially called a "Dork Disk" and you don't need it if your deraileur is adjusted correctly.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the quick reply. You are the same guy who suggested the Bianchi Volpe. I got one on Tuesday. They also had the Bianchi Axis and Specialized Tricross for 1300-1400 USD. Salesguy was fair enough to suggest a steel frame for me (mainly want to do some touring) and I was able to choose between the 2009 Volpe for 1100 or the 2008 for 1000. Took it out for a spin and went for the 2008 one knowing my wife would be happy because I had told her that I would try to spend 1000 or less.

  4. #4
    Bicycle Utopian bikinpolitico's Avatar
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    Also called pie plate. Consider it a gift from the universe that it has been removed without any effort from you. Never speak of it again.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    I hope you like the bike, it's good to know that there is a shop somewhere that will steer customers away from the race bikes if they aren't planning to race. Hell, any shop that keeps a steel bike or two in stock is a great shop. Your wife doesn't know yet that the price of the bike was just the beginning does she?
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  6. #6
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    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.
    Ah yes, the genius responsible for this thread shares his wisdom yet again.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.
    I have three carbon wonders and one aluminum bike. And I still would LOVE a Waterford steel touring bike!!!!!! That thing would be killer!!!!!!!!

  9. #9
    painthawg painthawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.
    Hopefully this was a shot at humor.

    I don't own any titanium but of my steel, aluminum and carbon bikes the one aluminum bike is the least fun to ride. My steels are a blast and I get caught riding them more often than not. Ride the stuff that gives you the biggest smiles and/or most miles.

    As an aside, I doubt that a large number of the general bike riding public can identify individual metal frame materials at a glance anyway.

    As for the dork disk, I usually leave them on a new bike for a few weeks to make sure the deraileur (sp?) is dialed in. Then it is kindly shown the recycling bin.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle View Post
    Ah yes, the genius responsible for this thread shares his wisdom yet again.
    No need for sarcasm and I didn't start this thread. There is no absolute wisdom and no opinion is right or wrong or written in stone. Everyone has their experiences and bases their opinions on that.

    Steel is heavy and rusts. The latest materials are lightweight, strong, and maintenance-free. Why stick with the same stuff Schwinn was using 50 years ago? What "blast" does steel give other than its weight?

    I've had steel bikes and they never made the impression or provided the enjoyment as my recent aluminum frames. Will never will look back at steel again.
    Last edited by Richard8655; 09-12-08 at 09:20 PM.

  11. #11
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    Steel is real. Steel is easy to find, easy to work with, and easy to reuse. Steel is heavy, yes, and strong. It can be bent back into shape, it can be re-welded. It has balance and weight properties missing in aluminum, titanium and carbon. That being said, aluminum, titanium and carbon are lightweight, torsionally rigid, don't rust or corrode, and cost more. There is a market for each. If you happen to exclude yourself from certain markets, box yourself into certain markets, or just have an allergy to materials the rest of the world has been enjoying for centuries, it's okay to express your preference or distaste. But please don't assume that everyone shares your predilection toward a certain type of material and segregation of another.

    Aluminium is an amazing compound found in 99% of the earth's crust. It is nearly inexhaustable in supply, easy to work, durable, light, and affordable. Perhaps this is the metal of the future...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.

  13. #13
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    Steel is real, wool is real, that's why real cyclists wear steel wool underpants

    I don't know who came up with that, but it sums up the debate.

    I find I prefer my steel bikes, but I'm not fast enough to obsess over whether I'd save 0.0003 seconds over 50 miles.

    The reality is that the important thing is the quality of the ride. A good designer could make a bike built out of scaffolding run well.

    A good steel bike frame is within a pound of an alloy one. Neither can compete with Carbon for weight, but I would find it difficult to use my carbon fibre bike for knock around duties, and I'd trust a 10yr old steel frame more than a similar age other material except Ti.

    BTW I love the term "dork disk" - never heard it before, but it's the right word!

    Ti versus 953 is the big question for me

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    The latest materials are lightweight, strong, and maintenance-free. Why stick with the same stuff Schwinn was using 50 years ago? What "blast" does steel give other than its weight?
    Two friends of mine have had to replace entire carbon frames this year because they broke in crashes. So perhaps "maintenance-free" is exactly correct, you just throw it away after a crash and get a new one.

    With today's heat-treated steel tubing, you get durability and a fantastic ride for minimal (in some cases, zero) weight penalty and reasonable cost. Like any material, there are pluses and minuses. For the ultimate combination of light weight and stiffness, I will accept (for the moment) carbon's supremacy. The material's catastrophic mode of failure, on the other hand, concerns me.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    No need for sarcasm and I didn't start this thread. There is no absolute wisdom and no opinion is right or wrong or written in stone. Everyone has their experiences and bases their opinions on that.

    Steel is heavy and rusts. The latest materials are lightweight, strong, and maintenance-free. Why stick with the same stuff Schwinn was using 50 years ago? What "blast" does steel give other than its weight?

    I've had steel bikes and they never made the impression or provided the enjoyment as my recent aluminum frames. Will never will look back at steel again.
    the current steel being used is far from the what scwhinn used 50 years ago! steel technology has advanced by leaps and bounds and continues to advance. they are stronger, lighter, and have many other positive characterstics compared to steel years ago. and from i've been told, they pretty resistant to rust as long as you don't leave the thing lying outside...in the snow...while the salt truck sprays it. when i was considering getting a custom bike, the guys at my LBS said that, "if you take care of a waterford the same way you'd take care of a high end carbon bike, it'll last DECADES!"

    as for heavy...the latest waterford road race frames are nearly as light as all the the absolute lightest carbon frames. if i remember correctly, their dream bike build was something like 14 or 15 lbs. plenty light! there are guys on these very forums with carbon wonders from cervelo, pinarello, look, etc whose bikes are 14-15lbs. and the UCI minimum limit is 14 lbs. so yeah...i think steel is light enough.

    as far as how it feels...i think if you gave it a shot, you'd find that a quality steel frame would in fact be a blast! different than carbon or aluminum. very comfortable...and very lively!

    i think your negative impression of steel is based on older steel frames...low quality steel frames....or both. just a hunch.

  16. #16
    Super Moderator making's Avatar
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    HEy, where did you lose that dork disc, mine broke. Is cheap plastic lighter than titanium? Think they make titanium dork disc?
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  17. #17
    Senior Member Rockrivr1's Avatar
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    I didn't give the plastic thing any thought what so ever. I had one on my mountain bike, but not on my road bike. Dork ring or whatever you want to call it is there and unless you are counting every once who gives a crap what other people think about it. Unfortunately the plastic ring broke on me during a a ride in the woods on my mtb and jammed the wheel. Took a ride over the handlebars due to it. Not sure why it broke, but it. If it didn't break it would probably still be on my bike.

    As to the steel bike argument, I had a steel Trek Mountain Track for over 11 years and I beat on that bike in the woods constantly and it held up without an issue. If the components around it didn't give way, I'd probably still own it. To each there own though.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockrivr1 View Post
    Unfortunately the plastic ring broke on me during a a ride in the woods on my mtb and jammed the wheel. Took a ride over the handlebars due to it. Not sure why it broke, but it. If it didn't break it would probably still be on my bike.
    How the hell did it jam your wheel? I am curious.

  19. #19
    Tiocfáidh ár Lá jfmckenna's Avatar
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    Where am I? Oh yeah I thought so. This is the cross forum right? I though the steel vs carbon vs aluminum vs ti bickering was left to the road forum?

    I just got an OX platinum cross bike and it is by far the best feel in a cross bike I have till date and I've been through a few. AL in the fields is just way to harsh a ride if you ask me. Carbon is good but like flargle said and I can say from experience one crash on carbon can cost you some serious bucks.

    BUt what ever.

    Remove the pie plate as it is unnecessary and can actually slip off break and go into your spokes.

  20. #20
    Eternal NooB threeflys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikinpolitico View Post
    Also called pie plate. Consider it a gift from the universe that it has been removed without any effort from you. Never speak of it again.

    I thought a "pie plate" was when you have a HUGE cog as your low gear, something like a 34 on the back... Of course, I could see why the dork disk would be called a pie plate also...
    If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire the A-Team.

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  21. #21
    Carpe Diem bdcheung's Avatar
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    I always thought pie plate = huge rear cog as well...
    "When you are chewing the bars at the business end of a 90 mile road race you really dont care what gear you have hanging from your bike so long as it works."
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  22. #22
    Senior Member Unagidon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by datako View Post
    Steel is real, wool is real, that's why real cyclists wear steel wool underpants

    I don't know who came up with that, but it sums up the debate.

    I find I prefer my steel bikes, but I'm not fast enough to obsess over whether I'd save 0.0003 seconds over 50 miles.

    The reality is that the important thing is the quality of the ride. A good designer could make a bike built out of scaffolding run well.

    A good steel bike frame is within a pound of an alloy one. Neither can compete with Carbon for weight, but I would find it difficult to use my carbon fibre bike for knock around duties, and I'd trust a 10yr old steel frame more than a similar age other material except Ti.

    BTW I love the term "dork disk" - never heard it before, but it's the right word!

    Ti versus 953 is the big question for me
    Go 953 - it'll be worth more when you want to sell it

    I have carbon, and steel. Just sold my aluminum last night so don't own aluminum anymore. Obviously, that tells you what I prefer. Steel feels great, and I probably spend just as much time on my steel bike as my carbon. For those that say steel feels dead, maybe it was the grade of steel?
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    I wouldn't be caught dead riding a steel bike. We left the Iron Age a long time ago. Aluminum, titanium, and carbon represent the future.
    Wrong. Adamantium is the next wave.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    No need for sarcasm and I didn't start this thread. There is no absolute wisdom and no opinion is right or wrong or written in stone. Everyone has their experiences and bases their opinions on that.

    Steel is heavy and rusts. The latest materials are lightweight, strong, and maintenance-free. Why stick with the same stuff Schwinn was using 50 years ago? What "blast" does steel give other than its weight?

    I've had steel bikes and they never made the impression or provided the enjoyment as my recent aluminum frames. Will never will look back at steel again.
    Actually, aluminum can corode. 6061 aluminum is considered a marine grade aluminum, but not all aluminum bikes are made from 6061. A friend has corroded through several different frames including aluminum from sweating on them. I would question whether any material is "maintenance free."

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
    There is no absolute wisdom and no opinion is right or wrong or written in stone. Everyone has their experiences and bases their opinions on that.

    Steel is heavy and rusts. The latest materials are lightweight, strong, and maintenance-free. Why stick with the same stuff Schwinn was using 50 years ago? What "blast" does steel give other than its weight?

    I've had steel bikes and they never made the impression or provided the enjoyment as my recent aluminum frames. Will never will look back at steel again.
    First, you're being mentally lazy. Yes, opinions can be right or wrong, mainly when they're absolutist. However, 'relative' truth doesn't give you a pass just to say any old damnfool thing and expect everyone to treat it with the same amount of respect as something with evidence and thought. People with limited experience with strong opinions should be told the error of their ways, and if they're smart at all, they'll listen.

    The fact that you're using meaningless aphorisms like 'left the Iron age' and 'represent the future' says a lot. I give that about as much credence when Grant Peterson waxes philosophical about 'tradition', i.e. less than none.

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