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  1. #1
    trn
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    Easton EA70 vs. EA90SL

    Easton EA70 vs. EA90SL - which Wheelset? Is the 90 really that much better than the EA 70? These will be used all over town, on the road, off road, at crossraces etc. Going on my Surly CX with a bunch of other light components.

  2. #2
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    go with the heavier EA70s, the rims are taller profiles, hence more stiff. they have less expensive hubs, than the '70s, but are still good. I have both wheelsets, and save the '90s for training races and fast centuries, and use the 90s for everyday training and riding

  3. #3
    trn
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    Responce is perfect

    I knew there was someone out there who could distinctly answer my question! Thanks for the accurate responce. I'm sold on the EA70 as I think you identified it will be used arround town and for general use.

    If I ever get to the point where I want a second wheelset: how much more performance is there in the EA90SL than the EA 70? On a scale of 1-5 does the 120grams really make a difference in rotational weight and performace?

  4. #4
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    120 grams is about a quarter pound. Not much difference in weight, but it depends on your WWF (weight weenie factor) but I will say that I THINK that the EA90s ride smoother over bumpy roads as the front rim is only 21mm tall and the rear 25mm, hence less stiff than the 28mm tall '70s rims.

    Also the EA90s have a welded and machined joint in the rim, while the '70s use the old school method of crimping the joint (not welded). My experience is that crimped rims result in more aluminum flecks in the brake pads. Not a big deal, just pretend to be a dentist once a month and use a dental pick to dig out the little pieces of aluminum and rocks from the brake pads, this will save your rims from being worn out quickly.

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