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Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

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Old 12-16-08, 10:16 AM   #1
justsayyes
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Choosing between Easton EC90X and EC70X

I'm building a new single cross bike and could use some fork advice. I like the Easton's over the Ritchey's only because the blades are straight. Should I get the carbon steerer tubed 90 or aluminum tubed 70? The 70 weighs 3/4 pound more than the 90 but I worry about the carbon tube. Builder says not to worry, but he's the only one so far...

Also, does anyone know if the blades are the same?

I weigh 195 and end of this season/next season, will be my first year attempting to race, ever. Otherwise the bike will be used as my main bike for general purpose, cross-country style mountain biking on dry trails (somewhat rocky & rutted), and coffee runs.

Steve
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Old 12-16-08, 11:56 AM   #2
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if you can afford it, go with the EC90
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Old 12-16-08, 02:55 PM   #3
rudetay
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The carbon steerer shouldn't worry you. I suppose it's theoretically not as strong, but as long as your paying a bit of attention when installing the stem you'll be ok.

It's just one more carbon item between the ground and your hands that will add to the improved ride quality of a carbon fork. I have not used carbon stems or bars due to the cost issue, but I have noticed a difference between a carbon steerer fork and one without. Of course I can not be sure if the difference was because of the fork overall or the steerer, but I'd like to think it is, haha.
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Old 12-18-08, 11:49 AM   #4
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a lot of people argue that the carbon steerer is actually stronger because it's one material the whole way through whereas an aluminum steerer has to be attached to the fork crown somehow. i've never heard of anyone having problems with either fork.

the main functional drawback of a carbon steerer as i see it is that you really ought to use a torque wrench every time you install your stem. i like to fiddle with spacers and different stems when i dial in a bike's fit, sometimes even in the middle of a ride, so that makes aluminum steerers attractive to me. i've run both without issue though.
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Old 12-18-08, 04:49 PM   #5
justsayyes
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Thanks. This helps a lot in my decision.
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