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  1. #1
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    Eno Eccentric hub tightening...

    I have the Eno rear hub on a frame with beefy vertical dropouts. Any comments on just how tight is too tight? I stood my way up a pretty steep hill today - very short - and the hub rotated. After that I cranked down the bolts a fair amount and on the short hill home (road this time), it slipped again, though only slightly.

    I afraid to crack the bolts...

    I'm 6'0" & 195 lbs.

  2. #2
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    The hub slipping is prima facie evidence that you didn't tighten them enough.

    Or not.

  3. #3
    Padovano Mike552's Avatar
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    Use some type of abrasive washer on all the 4 contact points.
    *1987 Panasonic DX-5000/STI-9 *1983 Univega Gran Premio/STI-9 *1991 Bridgestone MB-2/Suntour XC Pro

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike552 View Post
    Use some type of abrasive washer on all the 4 contact points.
    That is a Bad Idea atmho.

    BTW tighted non-drive-side first.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle View Post
    That is a Bad Idea atmho.

    BTW tighted non-drive-side first.
    OK, but why is that? Just curious...

  6. #6
    Padovano Mike552's Avatar
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    I was thinking about something like this. In either case, it would have to be very thin with sharp little teeth. (Sounds like my ex, actually...)
    *1987 Panasonic DX-5000/STI-9 *1983 Univega Gran Premio/STI-9 *1991 Bridgestone MB-2/Suntour XC Pro

  7. #7
    Padovano Mike552's Avatar
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    Or, if you think washers are a no-go, you might want to try to replace the stock nuts with ones that have a more abrasive contact point... (This is something I had to do to get rid of my ex...)
    *1987 Panasonic DX-5000/STI-9 *1983 Univega Gran Premio/STI-9 *1991 Bridgestone MB-2/Suntour XC Pro

  8. #8
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    Adding more washers would simply give more places for the hub to slip. The hub is designed to dig into the dropout over a large contact area to prevent slipping. The nuts are very nice and have built-in washers.

    You tighten non-drive-side first, because tightening the drive-side is in the direction of slacking the chain. Here is the procedure:
    1. Find location of cranks which gives most chain tension (no chainwheel is perfectly round or centered).
    2. With crank at that location, put a bit of weight on the saddle while tightening the non-drive-side nut.
    3. Tighten drive-side nut.
    4. Check chain tension.
    5. Final tightening. Don't be wimpy.

    Et voila.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle View Post
    Adding more washers would simply give more places for the hub to slip. The hub is designed to dig into the dropout over a large contact area to prevent slipping. The nuts are very nice and have built-in washers.

    You tighten non-drive-side first, because tightening the drive-side is in the direction of slacking the chain. Here is the procedure:
    1. Find location of cranks which gives most chain tension (no chainwheel is perfectly round or centered).
    2. With crank at that location, put a bit of weight on the saddle while tightening the non-drive-side nut.
    3. Tighten drive-side nut.
    4. Check chain tension.
    5. Final tightening. Don't be wimpy.

    Et voila.
    Thanks! What you said makes sense and I'll try that. I did hear from White Ind. and they basically said don't be afraid to crank the bolts as well.

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