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Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

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Old 06-29-09, 09:59 AM   #1
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Specialized Tricross Fork change

One of the things I've heard people say is how heavy the Tricross fork is. I've got an older 2006 Comp model and I'd like to switch it out to a more trimmer version but don't want to get the wrong thing and also don't want to break the bank. Anyone have any suggestions on a decent fork that can help my Tricross shed a couple pounds?
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Old 06-29-09, 11:37 AM   #2
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A couple of lbs? The Tricross fork is not that heavy. The only way to get considerable weight loss won't be cheap. The Easton EC70X weighs about 650 grams, the Ritchey Comp around 550. Two of the more affordable quality carbon forks. Check Specialized's website for geometry. The Tricross does not exactly use common fork rake, changing the fork will change how the bike handles.

I just swapped out a Ritchey Comp for the original steel fork and may have saved 400 grams?
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Old 06-29-09, 04:29 PM   #3
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Yeah, it probably isn't worth it. Most of the parts are not light, but not overly heavy either. Like you said, to make a considerable different, it's going to cost plenty. Probably won't be as rugged either. A plus when cross season comes...
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Old 06-29-09, 06:39 PM   #4
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The Tricross Comp is definitely not the lightest road bike out there.
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Old 06-29-09, 07:28 PM   #5
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I've never actually thought of changing the fork on my Singlecross. It's so weird and ugly in a only it's mother could love it sort of way. Like most things Specialized it's engineered to be the way it is. You will never never get bogged down in the mud because of the fork getting clogged up.
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Old 07-01-09, 10:28 PM   #6
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don't those tricross bikes have an integrated headset? I don't know if that means you can put any old fork on it? (or maybe you can, i just don't know)
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Old 07-02-09, 08:31 AM   #7
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It does have an integrated headset so yeah, not just any fork would work. I've heard of people changing them though and it was due to weight. Not sure how much the thing weights but probably not enough to make much difference.
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Old 07-06-09, 05:30 PM   #8
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>Like most things Specialized it's engineered to be the way it is. You will never never get bogged down in the mud because of the fork getting clogged up.

Actually not quite true. I once had to stop for exactly that reason - thick clay that ended up jamming both wheels. Here's a pic after I'd removed lots of it then ridden on some sealed road for a bit:

http://picasaweb.google.com.au/Steva...93178445753298
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Old 07-06-09, 05:30 PM   #9
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>Like most things Specialized it's engineered to be the way it is. You will never never get bogged down in the mud because of the fork getting clogged up.

Actually not quite true. I once had to stop for exactly that reason - thick clay that ended up jamming both wheels. Here's a pic after I'd removed lots of it then ridden on some sealed road for a bit:

http://picasaweb.google.com.au/Steva...93178445753298
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Old 07-06-09, 08:53 PM   #10
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Not much choice available in carbon forks with canti posts. You could probably save more weight in the wheels, but still not cheap. Lighter tires and tubes would give cheaper weight savings.
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Old 07-15-09, 06:06 AM   #11
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Hmm, here's a much better picture of mud in a Tricross fork...


And for more laughs:

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Old 07-15-09, 08:33 AM   #12
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Wow that looks like tough going. What tires were you using? Would it have mattered?
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Old 07-16-09, 06:14 AM   #13
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Those were actually the stock "Boroughs CX" slicks. This was a fully loaded tour on some four wheel drive tracks, after a night of rain. I found the slippery conditions fun, to be honest, but once you start sinking in, it builds up like that and you can't go on. As you can see, it built up around the canti brakes, but also behind the front derailleur.


What was interesting was of the five bikes on the tour, mine was the second best in the mud, behind a Kona Sutra with disk brakes and no mud guards. The two worst both had mud guards, which are a disaster in these kind of conditions: they trap the mud between the wheel and the guard, making it lock up solid and forcing you to take the wheel off to clean it out.
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