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Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

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Old 09-05-10, 10:22 PM   #1
Action_jack
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Specialized Tricrosses

I've been eying up the Specialized Tricross family for a while. I'm looking for an entry level Cyclocross bike probably in the used area and under $1000. I like the way the Tricrosses look and all of the reviews I have read have mostly been really positive. My question is: Do the Tricrosses seem like a decent starter bike for the cyclocross field? Are there other brands I could look at? Also is there that much of difference in the different tricross bike like the sport triple, the comp triple, expert double, S-Works etc. I mean I know there is probably some weight differences but as far as components and wheels go is it really worth the extra money to get the pricier ones

Last edited by Action_jack; 09-05-10 at 10:28 PM. Reason: Needded to clarify part of thequestion
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Old 09-06-10, 10:22 AM   #2
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While I love the 2 Comp level one's I have, I would say no. Personally, I think you can find a much better value with other brands such as Fuji or Redline.

Yes, there is a huge difference between the frames and component levels between say a Sport triple to a S-Works. Each step up gets you better components and sometimes better frames. The Sport and Comps are both Aluminum frames, but I can tell you from experience, the Comp frame is MUCH nicer than the Sport model. So are the components. I've had a Sport model and currently have 2 Comp models and while the Sport is fine and a great bike, it was worth the extra $500-600 for the next level up for me. I didn't see such difference between the Comp and the Expert though. Sure, better components/wheels, but we're now talking about a level that I don't care about personally. You may feel the same way about the jump from Sport to Comp.
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Old 09-06-10, 11:20 AM   #3
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are you using it to actually take part in Cyclocross? Or just get into road'ish cycling? If you're just starting out, nothing wrong with the lower levels.
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Old 09-06-10, 11:51 AM   #4
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@Knobster

Thanks, I'll look into the Fujis and redlines. Your probably right on the difference between the comp and the expert. If you were a professional I'm sure the little bit of advantage that the expert would give you would be more important, but I'm also not really looking to get to that level either.
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Old 09-06-10, 11:53 AM   #5
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Probably mostly into road'ish cycling? Maybe some actual races later.
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Old 09-06-10, 01:10 PM   #6
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The Sport triple is a very decent bike. What would be really nice would be to get a second road wheelset and use the original one's for cross or trails if you chose to do that later. I really like the Tricross and think it's an excellent bike, but in honesty, it's a little over priced.

You do truly get a "do-it-all" type of bike though. (Sport Model) Good enough for road cycling (even better with a decent, lighter wheelset), good enough for cyclocross (with a change of tires), great for commuting and decent for touring. Has rack and fender mounts and a third water bottle mount. Won't excel at any one thing but if you don't want an entire stable of bikes (like I do), then a Tricross is a very good choice.

Edit: Maybe look for a used one? My 2006 Comp was a year old when I bought it and was nearly un-used. I picked it up for $900. Went new for $2000.
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Old 09-06-10, 03:13 PM   #7
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I found this one a little while back not really sure if its a decent deal though. I mean minus the $100 bucks he wants for the aero bars that puts it at about $800 does that seem like a fair price?
http://lansing.craigslist.org/bik/1933818923.html

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Old 09-06-10, 05:45 PM   #8
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It's not much of a deal. I've seen these Sport models go on EBay for a couple hundred less and in comparable condition. If you're patient, I think you'll find what you're looking for very soon. People will see cross season approaching as an opportunity to off load the bike they never ride. Good opportunity to get one at a real decent deal. I wouldn't pay more than $650 for a Sport model and no more than $1200 for a Comp from a previous year.
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Old 09-09-10, 06:19 PM   #9
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I bought the sport triple in 2008 and I love it. However, I found that I don't need the granny gear as much as I thought and wish I had gotten the compact double instead. That said, even the Tiagra triple works great and I has been a great bike.

I don't race cyclocross or anything but I wanted a road type bike that was fast, but sturdy and damp enough for some rutty dirt roads and carriage paths. The Tricross also has front and rear rack mounts for touring or hauling gear.
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Old 09-19-10, 09:32 AM   #10
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Bought a TriCross Sport triple as a general purpose bike. I get on it and leave my Roubaix Ultegra hanging frequently.
I use the granny gears. In fact I put a 26T on it. I live in the Rockies and like the TriCross for climbing mountain passes and the super ride down.
I take it to the marina when I go sailing. That requires climbing some 8 & 9% grades. My brother says I will be a geezer when I hit 64 next year.
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Old 09-19-10, 12:19 PM   #11
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Like CHAS, I ride my Comp (triple) mostly on paved roads while climbing mountain passes. In that respect, it's a very comfortable road bike and an excellent climber.

Here's a pic while riding around Turquoise lake last week. The climb is about 1800 ft. A fun ride on my second favorite all-rounder.


Here's my favorite all-rounder ... Getting there is half the fun

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Old 09-19-10, 02:18 PM   #12
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Werks, if I had that setup, I wouldn't mind "driving" to the start of rides so much.
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Old 09-19-10, 06:10 PM   #13
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Quote:
knobster wrote:
Werks, if I had that setup, I wouldn't mind "driving" to the start of rides so much.
Speaking of enjoying the drive to the start ... here's another bike rack I made to transport my 25 year old Cannondale and the TriCross


...and occasionally the tandem.
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Old 09-20-10, 11:16 PM   #14
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well werks, its official, you have too many toys!

love the Triumph rack--does it stay nice and stable, I imagine it does as you sure as heck wouldnt want movement back there and high up.

As someone with definately a foot in each camp--bicycling, outdoor stuff all my life, but also having followed motorsport, did some production bike racing 25 years ago on a 2 stroke road bike, have been to F1 races, CART, LeMans--I can relate to your toys.

am not in a position to have said toys, but can appreciate it. Im not that familiar with Triumphs, but arent they all triples? The ones that I have heard make quite a yummy sound (probably the 675 or whatever the sport bike ones are)

and yes, I am very happy with my Tricross sport, road riding only.

cheers

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Old 09-25-10, 02:37 AM   #15
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My wife, before I met her, went on a 3k mile tour on her tricross, then came back and raced a season on it. She had a sport model, which, in my opinion, is a great touring bike. It comes with a triple/granny, Tiagra is a very workmanlike groupset that's inexpensive yet durable, and is just a good bike. She put 60 pounds of gear on her bike and rode the hell out of it.

I've had tricrosses myself, too. I've had an '06 s-works that's been an awesome bike. I just replaced it, sadly (ok, not really) with an '09 s-works - which is a carbon frame, and a whole lot lighter/stiffer than the alloy '06.

Differences in tricrosses: Sport to Comp - aside from the component, up through 2010, the comp comes with their "E5" aluminum instead of "A1." A1 is their lowest end alloy, the E5 is lighter/stiffer/better. Aside from the component difference, the frame is just better. The geometry is the same throughout the line except for the s-works. The s-works is more of a race bike, the wheelbase/stays are shorter, it puts you into a bit more aggressive position, meant to do cross instead of being a freeroad/do it all bike.

The 2011 tricross is pretty much a dedicated touring bike. The comp level is the highest it goes to, it's A1 aluminum throughout the line, and it only comes in a triple. Sad. The crux is their new cross specific bike, and comes with what is basically the previous years s-works geometry throughout the line, only one water bottle cage, no rack mounts, etc.

I've loved my tricrosses, my wife would probably sooner leave me than that bike.
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Old 09-26-10, 09:27 PM   #16
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I've loved my tricrosses, my wife would probably sooner leave me than that bike.
chuckle--as for the rest of what you wrote, great to see an example of someone who has toured with it. Overall I am very happy with my Sport. Some people get in quite a huff with mentioning it as a "tourer", and while it may not be quite as stiff fully loaded (this is conjecture on mypart) as a full on tourer, I still think it is a really good "inbetween" of being a bit more fun and fast than a dedicated tourer, but still a very capable climber with its low gearing (I have had other Sport owners tell me that changing the 30 tooth granny to a 26 is a doable, no-fuss change if one wants a lower low)

While I would have to consider the wife or the bike, I still love it and with my first Brooks saddle ever, I love riding this bike for long rides, very comfy and with good riding characteristics for the type of riding I do and on the range of hills I ride on. The geometry or at least steering characteristics are a bit faster than my old touring bike, but for me anyway, are still very nice and relaxed for long rides.

Would you mind asking your wife what sort of front rack she used and how much weight she put on it, as well as how it handled with front bags.
I am used to lowriders (have done numerous 1000-1600km trips) , and am curious as to how much weight she put on the front fork? I was told by one bike store that the carbon fork should not have more than 10 lbs on it (but seem to recall reading another higher amount on a Spec. web page....)
How did the stock headset hold up?

cheers
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Old 09-28-10, 01:36 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Action_jack View Post
I've been eying up the Specialized Tricross family for a while. I'm looking for an entry level Cyclocross bike probably in the used area and under $1000. I like the way the Tricrosses look and all of the reviews I have read have mostly been really positive. My question is: Do the Tricrosses seem like a decent starter bike for the cyclocross field? Are there other brands I could look at? Also is there that much of difference in the different tricross bike like the sport triple, the comp triple, expert double, S-Works etc. I mean I know there is probably some weight differences but as far as components and wheels go is it really worth the extra money to get the pricier ones
As a first timer cyclocrosser back in 2006, my entry was a Specialized Comp from that year. I evaluated and test rode many other brands and never found one that fit and felt quite as good. I wouldn't look at an entry level cross bike strictly in terms of money, but rather how it feels and enjoyment. Afterall, you can pick a mediocre "value" bike but then you have to live with mediocre riding and experience. Like anything else, you get what you pay for.

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