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  1. #1
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    Need cross pedal with LEAST twist to disengage

    Ok, the long version is that I had a procedure on my ankle that tightened things up. Basically this procedure virtually eliminates my available inversion of my ankle. I currently am running eggbeaters set at 15*. The kicker is that it is my left ankle that is affected. I can get in and out of my pedals but it takes a bit of contortion from hip/knee to make the 15* required to get out of the pedals. Not ideal for dismounting at 15mph.

    I need to look for a pedal with the least amount of twist to disengage. I am even willing to run 2 different pedals if need be with shims etc to match pedal height. It seems that most SPDs disengage at a set amount of twist with varying tensions.

    I do realize that I will have to modify my dismount procedure, but catching this foot in the pedal and essentially spraining the newly rebuilt ligaments is my largest concern. Any help will be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Shimano SPD cleats can be purchased with 0 degrees of float, this cleat is the SH51. There is still float in the pedal, so its not a true 0 degree float, but is definitely going to be less than the 15 in your crank bros. Changing tension in the SPD pedal does not change float, just the ease of entering and exiting the cleat from the pedal. I expect that using the SH51 with a low spring tension would be your best bet, though it will definitely hinder performance due to the possibility of unclipping prematurely on climbs or technical areas.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam_mac84 View Post
    [C]atching this foot in the pedal and essentially spraining the newly rebuilt ligaments is my largest concern.
    Then don't race cross, dumbass.

  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Revert to Clips and straps like the old days ... Lyotard 460 D pedals.

    cut the straps and screw them on the ends of the pedal so the mud falls thru..
    Got a pair of Rivat Cross shoes from back then, if you wear a 9.5 US.
    and a pair of SiDi's with the external slot cleat that fit a 10. will sell both.

    fortunately the season is over .. take care of that ankle until next season.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 12-27-10 at 08:30 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle View Post
    Then don't race cross, dumbass.
    oh really? That's probably the best bet, if you can't do something 100 percent conventionally, than one shouldn't do it. I asked for some information on pedals, not your poor assessment of my bodies biomechanics, I think I have that covered.

    My stem is a little too long too, so it makes my back hurt, I am worried about riding my bike causing pain... I guess I should just stop instead of making an equipment change huh?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam_mac84 View Post
    oh really? That's probably the best bet, if you can't do something 100 percent conventionally, than one shouldn't do it. I asked for some information on pedals, not your poor assessment of my bodies biomechanics, I think I have that covered.

    My stem is a little too long too, so it makes my back hurt, I am worried about riding my bike causing pain... I guess I should just stop instead of making an equipment change huh?
    In light of this post, let me change my advice:

    Go ahead and race cross on your newly rebuilt ligaments, dumbass!

  7. #7
    Riding like its 1990 thenomad's Avatar
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    How about mountain bike old school powergrips? The strap that is attached to the pedal?
    My blog about rides, bikes and builds: ridesgoneby.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    these go to eleven
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    Speedplay Frogs have no resistance when you come out of the pedal. Might be worth considering.

  9. #9
    Surf Bum
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    If you have spd mtb pedals, have you tried using the sh-55 cleats? You can release those by pulling straight up or just about any direction you'd like.

    But overall I can't imagine a scenario in which a person's ankle can't handle twisting out of a light tension regular spd cleat, but yet can handle running up hills, through mud and sand and jumping over barriers while carrying or rolling a bicycle. Be careful, man.
    Want to buy: 56mm-58mm Ritchey road frame

  10. #10
    astrositupataphysicyclist UBUvelo's Avatar
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    i'm very used to the classic SPD system, but recently bought some Crank Bros. Smarties from Nashbar (on sale at the time for $15...with the cleats!) just to see what they were like. so far so good. there is no adjustment with these. you attach the cleats on your shoe one way for easy disengagement...or switch the clips for a more radical (tho more secure) hold/disengagement.

    they are very easy to clip out of with what seems like little ankle movement. you can always work on various compensations...do the muscle memory thing: twist your calf/knee a bit more, etc. also, depending on the extent of your ankle issue, address it a bit more (if you haven't already) with massage, stretch, etc...

    good luck!


    p.s. edit: here's the pair i got...still cheap...they say 'mountain' but i have them on my 'cross bike.

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes//Produc...2_513986_-1___
    Last edited by UBUvelo; 12-30-10 at 09:52 AM. Reason: info torquing
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacificaslim View Post
    But overall I can't imagine a scenario in which a person's ankle can't handle twisting out of a light tension regular spd cleat, but yet can handle running up hills, through mud and sand and jumping over barriers while carrying or rolling a bicycle. Be careful, man.
    This is a nicer way of stating it than I did. When I say "dumbass", I mean it in the most endearing, Red-Forman-esque spirit.

  12. #12
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Adjusting the cleat's rotational position can have the disengagement at any angle desired.

    When setting up cleats, I first put the cleat bolts 2/3 forward in the slots, then sight down the cleat's centerline so that it "aims" to a spot just "outboard" of the center of the heel.
    Rotating the cleat so that it aims further outboard of the heel's centerline will have the engagement occurring closer to the point where the shoe is pointing straight ahead, which at some point will make disengagement too easy.

    As others have mentioned, lighter tension adjustment and free-releasing pedals also would both make for easier releases.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle View Post
    This is a nicer way of stating it than I did. When I say "dumbass", I mean it in the most endearing, Red-Forman-esque spirit.
    Quote Originally Posted by pacificaslim View Post
    If you have spd mtb pedals, have you tried using the sh-55 cleats? You can release those by pulling straight up or just about any direction you'd like.

    But overall I can't imagine a scenario in which a person's ankle can't handle twisting out of a light tension regular spd cleat, but yet can handle running up hills, through mud and sand and jumping over barriers while carrying or rolling a bicycle. Be careful, man.
    The scenario is that it is an anatomical repair involving suturing the extensor retinaculum of the ankle to the periosteum of the fibula, as well as re-tensioning of the ATFL and CFL as a treatment for chronic instability. The side-effect of the surgery is that there is a significant loss of inversion especially when the ankle is plantarflexed. The stability and 'safety' of the ankle will be appropriate for running, jumping, sprinting etc, however, my chances for injury go up significantly if i hang a cleat in my pedal when approaching barriers because i don't have the appropriate inversion to disengage the cleat.

    Flargle, I appreciate your endearing comments, but I can assure you that the recommendation of changing pedals to accommodate the 'cross dismount', is the same that I would give to any of my patients in the same situation.

    Thanks all for the comments, i will try adjusting the cleats rotational position first, and after that, possibly the SH-55's.

  14. #14
    Overacting because I can SpongeDad's Avatar
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    Not sure what the play is, but Time ATACs have very light disengagement effort, much lighter than the play-adjustable Speedplays on my roadbike. I'm not sure I rotate my left foot at all when doing a cross dismount - it's more of a small turn my whole leg by rotating my hips and simply sliding off the pedal. The effort is so slight that I was worried that the pedals wouldn't stay clipped during hard efforts or pedaling out of the saddle, but I've never had a problem after nearly 2 dozen races.
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