Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-08-11, 09:37 PM   #1
sam83
On Two Wheels
Thread Starter
 
sam83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Middle Tennessee
Bikes: Moots Vamoots, Bianchi Volpe, 2 Salsa Casserolls (fixed & Triple), 2011 Salsa Chili Con Crosso, 1983 Schwinn Supersport, Schwinn Mesa MTB
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Chili Con Crosso for other than Cross?

I'm not a cross racer and probably won't be.

I'm a road rider. But...

In the winter I sometimes run into snow an slush in the shaded areas on my 20-55 mile rides.
I don't like the thought of getting my steel frame sloppy wet because I can't trust myself to thoroughly clean it up right afterwards.
There are a lot of beat up roads and dirt roads in my area to explore.
I have a 6-mile commute on less-than-perfect roads.
I'm not a fan of flat bars.
If I had a cross bike, I might just try a cross race.
My fit is more suited to a longer head tube (not a racer!).

I'm looking at the Salsa Chili Con Crosso. Since I also do a little fixed riding, I find the swappable dropouts appealing.

Does the Salsa offer a roadie-friendly ride and should I consider anything else?

Thanks
sam83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-11, 11:40 PM   #2
knobster
.
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Hillsboro, Oregon
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Comp, Soma ES
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"Does the Salsa offer a roadie-friendly ride and should I consider anything else?"

With a change of tires, it should perform fine on the road, but there will be differences. Compare the geometries and you'll find that cross bikes have some differences. The cross bike will be more upright and the handling may be a bit slower. I don't know the Salsa geometry but this is fairly typical of most cross bikes.

Should you consider anything else? Of course. So many to list, but I have experience with the Specialized Tricross which is a great all around bike. I like the Comp version and above due to the higher level components and frame. Many, many more to look over. See what your local stores carry and take them for a spin.

Cross bikes are great for what you're talking about using it for. This is what I use mine for as well. Wish I could race cross but a bad wrist prevents it. You should give cross a shot next year. It's a blast!
__________________
Demented internet tail wagging imbicile.
knobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-11, 11:42 AM   #3
meanwhile
Senior Member
 
meanwhile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 4,033
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam83 View Post
I'm not a cross racer and probably won't be.

I'm a road rider. But...

In the winter I sometimes run into snow an slush in the shaded areas on my 20-55 mile rides.
I don't like the thought of getting my steel frame sloppy wet because I can't trust myself to thoroughly clean it up right afterwards.
There are a lot of beat up roads and dirt roads in my area to explore.
I have a 6-mile commute on less-than-perfect roads.
I'm not a fan of flat bars.
If I had a cross bike, I might just try a cross race.
My fit is more suited to a longer head tube (not a racer!).

I'm looking at the Salsa Chili Con Crosso. Since I also do a little fixed riding, I find the swappable dropouts appealing.

Does the Salsa offer a roadie-friendly ride and should I consider anything else?

Thanks
1. You could have your steel bike treated with Frame Saver.

2. In the conditions you describe you'll burn through power trains quicker than you will frames - much quicker! You might want to ride singlespeed in the winter, or fit an IGH, if you want to be able to go slack on maintenance. Or just fit a low end groupset with cheap replacement cassettes and derailers.

3. Compared to a roading racing bike, a crosser will usually be less twitchy, offer a riding position with a little better visibility, and be more prone to staying upright when it hits pot holes. For obvious reasons, given the conditions it is meant to race in. It will probably be a little less aero and need a little more steering input for the same amount of turn. If you run a crosser with 35 or 40mm tyres then you'll get a much more comfortable ride and have a much more relaxed attitude to pot holes. Most people think a crosser makes a great road bike for anything short of racing - and they can be pretty good even at that. I think the CCC's geometry is pretty standard, so all the above should apply.
meanwhile is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:16 AM.