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Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

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Old 11-05-11, 06:17 PM   #1
ricohman
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Is shouldering necessary?

I am thinking about buying a 2007 Giant TCX from a friend. But I cannot shoulder this bike. My arms are to long to matter which way I grab it.
The bike is a medium, I am 5'9". The TT length seems ok but the compact frame doesn't allow me to shoulder it. My Specialized Roubaix is easier to shoulder.
I noticed Giant went to a different frame in '09. Was it because of this?
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Old 11-05-11, 10:05 PM   #2
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I try to shoulder in races most of the time, but sometimes my back is hurting and I cant. I see many people run with the bike, and if you can run as fast as you can shoulder, and you don't get in the way, you should be fine.
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Old 11-05-11, 10:14 PM   #3
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I'm new to this type of racing so if we are running up stairs or a rocky hill then I wouldn't be able to push it. I guess what I need to know is this bike to small if I can't shoulder it? Or is it a design problem of this particular bike?
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Old 11-05-11, 10:36 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ricohman View Post
I'm new to this type of racing so if we are running up stairs or a rocky hill then I wouldn't be able to push it. I guess what I need to know is this bike to small if I can't shoulder it? Or is it a design problem of this particular bike?
I'd imagine your ability to shoulder a frame with a sloping top tube has no bearing on whether it's the right size for you.

It's only a design problem if you allow it to be. Try doing runups by grabbing the nose of the saddle and shouldering that way. Right hand out, palm up, under the nose of the saddle then hoist your bike up.

If you prefer the arm-through-the-front-triangle style I'd shop for a frame with a horiz. top tube.
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Old 11-05-11, 10:39 PM   #5
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I don't understand how your arms can be too long to shoulder the bike. Too short I could see (kind of) but not too long.

Can you describe the problem in more detail?

Edit: After thinking about it some more, I think I can picture it. It may indicate that the bike is too small, but not necessarily. You can usually carry the bike in other ways, but shouldering is useful.
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Old 11-06-11, 07:03 AM   #6
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Yes those older Giants had a pretty sloping top tube, which they've since flattened out. But that doesn't mean you can't shoulder it, it'll just be more of a hassle. Probably the bicep curl technique will work, if you grab the top tube close to the seatpost.
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Old 11-06-11, 07:27 AM   #7
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Are you grabbing the top tube in preparation to shoulder, or the down tube? You should be grabbing the down tube if you're not. Also, with enough practice, you can learn to "flick" the bike onto your shoulder. This is basically grabbing the down tube and "tossing" it onto your shoulder. When your putting the bike back down, it should slide down your arm from your shoulder until you catch it with your hand on the down tube and then set it down taking care not to bounce it on the ground (don't' want to lose a chain accidentally).
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Old 11-06-11, 10:01 AM   #8
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Went out and gave it a few more tries. The distance from my palm to my elbow is about 3 inches longer than any distance inside the triangle. Wiggling it through is possible but when removing my arm (putting the bike down) allows the teeth of the crank to hit my arm. Can't do it in a hurry.
I watched some video's on this and there is no way I can those techniques with this frame. I can flick my Marinoni onto my shoulder easy. And it has a bottle cage.
This is disappointing. Why did Giant decide on such a sloping tube on the '07 and '08's?
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Old 11-06-11, 12:14 PM   #9
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Why did Giant decide on such a sloping tube on the '07 and '08's?
I expect they were making a bike model primarily for the rest of the users
that commute on theirs
and wanted the 700-32 tires that road frames won't fit.

+1, A frame with a horiz top tube , some designers even think ahead
and ovalize the toptube to soften the shoulder carry.
AlAn did this almost 30 years ago ..
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Old 11-06-11, 05:49 PM   #10
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Well that sounds like a good reason to just get a Marinoni Fango.
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Old 11-06-11, 08:23 PM   #11
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You do at times have to pick it up, but you really don't have to shoulder it. If your arms are too long to do a traditional carry, simply do a top tube carry that looks like a push. If you're going up stairs, do a top-tube carry like you're at a barrier. It's not as efficient as a traditional carry, but it'll get the job done.
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Old 11-06-11, 09:34 PM   #12
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One can get away not shouldering in almost every condition, but running in the mud for long stints. If the bike is rolling in the mud, it's collecting mud and creating drag. This is when carrying is a must and the most energy efficient way is to shoulder.

Cross is a very technique sensitive sport. I would avoid equipment that limit one's abilities.
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Old 11-07-11, 09:35 AM   #13
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Its the same crossing on compact frames and mtn biking with hike-a-bike sections. Whatcha do is put the nose of the saddle on your shoulder instead of the TT. Don't bother shouldering with the TT.

HTH

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Old 11-07-11, 12:05 PM   #14
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I'm relatively new to cross, but I had a hard time shouldering my bike when lifting by the top tube. I found that lifting by the down tube and letting the bike slide onto my shoulder as a reach around and under for the bars, I don't hit my elbow on the bottom bracket. But like I said, I'm new so take it FWIW.
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Old 11-08-11, 07:40 PM   #15
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I went a tried a new Giant TCX. I could flick it up on my shoulder with no problems. I would have to say that the earlier frame does not lend itself to this technique.
So I guess that's why the frame has been changed to a more horizontal TT.
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