Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-28-11, 07:18 PM   #1
simonaway427
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Fredericton, NB, Canada
Bikes: 2010 S1, 2011 F75X
Posts: 1,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nervous about going tubular

Did my first year of competitive CX this year and did quite well (in my opinion...a mid season Cat upgrade and still got 3rd for the season)

I really want to upgrade to tubular for next year since I've heard lots of good things - big thing being ability to run lower pressures and puncture resistance.

That said...

I'm nervous about a few things
1) While I'm technically inclined, it seems like a lot of trouble to glue a tubular. If you roll one, or get a flat, its a lot of work to repair/replace vs a clincher.

2) Rolling them - a couple of the really fast guys on my circuit were severely hampered during a couple of races when they rolled their tires. Does it really happen that often?

3) Cost - most racers conserve their gucci setup for race day, and train on avg joe gear (read clincher setup). There are only 7-8 races during our fall season - not sure if its worth the cost and trouble for the benefit?

I'm 160 lbs, so I can running pretty low pressures with my current clincher setup already (Felt Cross wheels with Vittoria 34c - 42 rear/38 front)

Is it really worth it?
simonaway427 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-11, 04:54 PM   #2
trustnoone
Senior Member
 
trustnoone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Edmonton AB
Bikes: 2011 Colnago World Cup, 2012 Eddy Merckx AMX-2
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not sure but if the tubular rims waiting to be built are any indication, I'll be giving it a try next season.
trustnoone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-11, 08:00 PM   #3
harry2110
Senior Member
 
harry2110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why not go tubeless with a stans setup? You get the clincher easy of setup but a nearly puncture proof tire and ablity to run insanely low pressures?
harry2110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-11, 06:53 AM   #4
simonaway427
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Fredericton, NB, Canada
Bikes: 2010 S1, 2011 F75X
Posts: 1,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry2110 View Post
Why not go tubeless with a stans setup? You get the clincher easy of setup but a nearly puncture proof tire and ablity to run insanely low pressures?
considering that route too. LBS has a set of tubeless ready Ultegra 6700 wheels - I'd pair those with Hutchison Bulldogs.
simonaway427 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-11, 11:52 AM   #5
Stealthammer
Still spinnin'.....
 
Stealthammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Whitestown, IN
Bikes: Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....
Posts: 1,208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As long as you are riding in a supported race or a ride with SAG support, sew ups are great for their ride quality and reducing flats (once you have the gluing and repair aspects worked out), and I never had any issue with rolling on road or off (but I know others that have). The tubeless option might work out better for you if the gluing and repairing seems too much of a hassle, and I understand that they are a bit more supple than clinchers (but sew ups have a very special ride quality all their own). That said, if you haven't tried sew ups or tubeless I would give them both a try if I was still racing. I'd just keep the clinchers around for training and unsupported rides.
Stealthammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-11, 03:40 PM   #6
Surfer34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a bike with tubulars and one with clinchers. I will never run tubulars EVER again. Not worth the hassle the performance gain isnt enough to make much difference for me.
Surfer34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-11, 03:55 PM   #7
rydaddy
Type 1 Racer
 
rydaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Davis, CA
Bikes: A dozen or so.
Posts: 2,579
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm having great success running my road clinchers converted to tubeless. I weigh 185 lbs and haven't had a flat (or burp) all season. I'm running between 35-40 psi but I could probably go lower. I can't even burp the tire by squeezing the sidewalls (with 2 hands) at 20 psi and lower.

The rim/tire combo is everything. My combo of Kinlin XR200 rims and Michelin Mud 2's is perfect. A tight fitting bead is a must.
rydaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-11, 11:45 AM   #8
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,870
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 230 Post(s)
Perhaps you have to up your game-plan.
you resolve some of the issues, by getting several sets of wheels.
and a second bike, and someone to be a pit mechanic.

so if you puncture a tire you have a pre glued wheel to swap in the pits,
while you are doing a lap with the pit bike,
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-12, 06:57 AM   #9
STP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I took the leap into tubeless tires for this years CX season. I used last years wheels with clinchers as my pit wheels should I have a flat or problem during the race (because you'll need new wheels anyway). The reason I tried them was for all the same reasons you listed: Ride quality, low pressures for varied course conditions, etc. I have two cross bikes so I was able to train on one with clinchers and race on one with tubulars.

I found that I had to maintain the tubulars more during the season than I would with clinchers. That said, I enjoyed them immensely and never rolled a tire ever. I was able to experiment with the strategy of tire inflation moreso than if I'd been using clinchers.

The ONLY downside for me was being committed to one tread pattern for the whole season. I couldn't run out and buy a different set of tubulars for each condition and then commit the time several days in advance of the race to change tires. So I needed to settle on one "all-rounder" tread pattern. I chose the Challenge Grifo (I think) but I'll be making a change for next season and moving to the Clement PDX. The PDX is an excellent "all-rounder" with unbelievable grip and you don't have to waterproof their sidewalls, either! They are a great tire, but that's for you to decide.

All in all, my experience in the world of tubulars is still in it's infancy. I like the technical aspect of glueing because I like that sort of thing. I enjoyed the "testing" process for each race and I don't mind a little more expense. I didn't have any problems with them all season. I only raced them so they have plenty of life left in them although I'll switch next year anyway.

Hope my experience helps.
STP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:28 AM.