Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Beefy tires onto road bike for hardpack dirt/sand trails?

    Maybe not the best place for input on this. I have a 2010 Bianchi Vigorelli, it is a steel frame road bike with carbon fork.

    http://www.bianchiusa.com/archives/1...ndo/vigorelli/

    The place I recently moved to has a nice hardpack trail I want to ride on. It is a combination of hard packed dirt/sand and rough cement depending on the stretch of trail.

    I want to take the trail but feel like at minimum I would need bigger tires, as most people seem to have a mountain bike or hybrid bike on it. Is it common to just buy a separate wheel set with some beefier tires for my road rig to ride on trails like that? What tires would you recommend for non-racing and not expecting true offroad with dirt/mudd. Would I need any other modifications to add the bigger tires?

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    Posts
    25,073
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
    Team Water Andy_K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    My Bikes
    2013 Kona Jake, 2008 Kona Major Jake, 2013 Kona Jake the Snake, 1999 Kona Muni Mula, 2012 Ridley Excalibur, 2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker
    Posts
    6,793
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it's very likely that your frame won't accept tires bigger than 700x28, and maybe not even bigger than 700x25, particularly with those 105 brakes. That said, you could probably ride the conditions you describe with tires like that. It might not be ideal in terms of comfort, but you could try it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fredericton, NB, Canada
    My Bikes
    2010 S1, 2011 F75X
    Posts
    1,422
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'll have to test fit...if its a road bike, probably nothing larger than a 28mm tire.

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by simonaway427 View Post
    You'll have to test fit...if its a road bike, probably nothing larger than a 28mm tire.
    I was just downstairs looking at it and that sounds about right. I have a 25mm right now and its pretty close to the brakes. Thanks for the suggestions.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    529
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    28c tires will be okay on hardpack dirt and rough roads. People race cx on 30c's so 28c's will be just fine for rough roads and casual riding. Schwalbe, Continental, etc. all made nice "commuter" style 28c tires that'll suite you just fine (assuming they fit).

  7. #7
    Mud, Gore & Guts eddubal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bloomfield, NJ
    My Bikes
    2012 Van Dessel Gin & Trombones; 2011 Masi Speciale SSCX; '87 Peugeot Cannonball Express
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    See if your LBS will let you try on a 28 tire. If it fits with some clearance, you should be fine. If not go with the 25. Run your pressure lower than you do on asphalt. You're going to have to experiment on that so you don't pinch flat. There are no hard rules on that, just start high and work your way down.

    You might also look into file tread (Roubaix style) tires to give you a little more bite.
    52 closed, degenerate or unsupported objects rejected

  8. #8
    Old. Slow. Happy. MileHighMark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Boulder County, CO
    Posts
    1,339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get the fattest tires that your frame/fork/brakes will safely clear. Worth a visit to the LBS, as they might let you test tires for fit before buying.

    On last night's commute home, a guy on a conventional road bike was hauling ass down the dirt road that I was climbing. Got a quick look at this bike, and he was running 23 or 25mm tires. Color me impressed.
    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  9. #9
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    CID
    My Bikes
    1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX
    Posts
    7,675
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As a rough estimate, you could use allen wrenches as feeler gauges to see how much clearance your current tires have to the brakes. For example, if you're running 700x25s now, and a 4mm wrench fits between the tires, fork crown, and brake calipers, there's a decent chance you'll be able to run 28s.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    57
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I recently asked for tire recommendations for a similar situation but I don't have the clearance issues you do. I went w/ 35mm wide tires but a lot of the models I looked at were available in narrower options. I was impressed with the help I got from this board, lots of links, I found the best price on my selection on eBay. Do a search on my name and it should be a good start.

  11. #11
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,747
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by eddubal View Post
    See if your LBS will let you try on a 28 tire. If it fits with some clearance, you should be fine. If not go with the 25. Run your pressure lower than you do on asphalt. You're going to have to experiment on that so you don't pinch flat.
    ..This is not a good time to use $500 rims...

    Also, a lot depends on how much you weigh. People tend to assume that you're a typical ectomorphic cyclist in giving advice. If you're a 220lb caveman type then tyres that would work for a 160lber might be a bad idea to even try.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sherwood, OR
    Posts
    428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
    ..This is not a good time to use $500 rims...
    Where does it say the OP is riding $500 wheels? The stock wheels on his bianchi are $200, well within the experimentation range in my opinion.

  13. #13
    Mud, Gore & Guts eddubal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bloomfield, NJ
    My Bikes
    2012 Van Dessel Gin & Trombones; 2011 Masi Speciale SSCX; '87 Peugeot Cannonball Express
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
    Where does it say the OP is riding $500 wheels? The stock wheels on his bianchi are $200, well within the experimentation range in my opinion.
    Read between the lines. I think he's only furthering my advice... In other words: don't use your good wheels (if you have them) until you have the pressure dialed in, because you will flat at least once or twice while you find out the pressure you need to run them at. You don't want to risk trashing your expensive wheels on experimentation.
    52 closed, degenerate or unsupported objects rejected

  14. #14
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,747
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
    Where does it say the OP is riding $500 wheels? The stock wheels on his bianchi are $200, well within the experimentation range in my opinion.
    He doesn't. But it's still a point worth making - playing with low pressure and narrow tyres off road is not a time to use rims that you can't afford to replace.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •