Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NW Chicago Burbs
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    CX as a touring bike - road pedals?

    I bought an entry level CX bike as a more versatile option to ride around town, hit crushed limestone trails in parks/forest preserves near me, that sort of thing. I don't have any immediate plans of getting into racing or anything.

    I really miss being clipped in though. I have an old pair of road shoes and look pedals/cleats - for my use is there any major reason not to use these that I'm missing? I know eggbeaters / spd seem to be preferred, but I'm not really racing, or encountering mud. I've searched a fair bit, and it seems the main concerns are being able to clip in on more than 1 side, and ability to clip in all clogged with mud, etc (which I don't really encounter too much of).

    Thanks for reading.

  2. #2
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Windy City
    My Bikes
    Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Origin8 monstercross, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2
    Posts
    9,469
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Looks work great. Try-em.

    If you are Cyclocross racing, you might want another brand. However for general fitness and pleasure riding: Looks are great.
    When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

  3. #3
    Senior Member GrayJay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    EagleRiver AK
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Much more versatile if you have shoes/cleats that are comfortable for walking short distances. Ive gone from 20+ years of using look cleats on road bikes to using SPDs for all my riding (on and offroad), the advantage of actually being able to walk far outweighs whatever tiny advantage that look road cleats confere for anything but full-out road racing.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NW Chicago Burbs
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks. I'm currently using looks for the road and like them. I agree they're not great to walk in (though the ones with rubberized cleats are much better) but the vast majority of my riding is fitness. If I'm dying I might walk a few feet into a walgreens if I need something, but that's really only happened a few times. One day I might change, but for now I don't really feel like going through that.

    Just wanted to be sure there wasn't something obvious I was missing here, and since I have everything already it's NBD to put them on the new bike. Cheers

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,629
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wouldn't want to use Look/SPD-R pedals off road, as they are slippery enough just walking a short distance when using them a road bike.

    If you are going to need to walk anywhere and you want clipless, you really want a SPD/Eggbeater/Time Atac pedal, as others have noted, they are easy to walk in.

  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,400
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just be prepared to change shoes when you stop, since walking damages the cleats quickly..

    Spud recessed cleat shoes may be better in the long run,

    SPD-r will get you started , get the MTB pedal , and the separate cleat
    with wing pontoons for your roadie hard soled shoes.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 09-15-13 at 10:55 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NW Chicago Burbs
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks. I rarely stop since I'm paranoid of leaving my bike, when I do it's not like I'm grocery shopping. By riding around town I just meant being a little more versatile when it comes to gravel lots, busted up alleys, jumping curbs, stuff you can't really get away with on a roadie - I didn't mean running errands and the like. I'll get new pedals/shoes eventually, but since I have all this crap laying around anyway I'll use it as a stop gap measure.

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,400
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lake had spinning class shoes, they built up the toe and heel so falls on waxed floors is less likely.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    3,629
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BTM87 View Post
    stuff you can't really get away with on a roadie
    You massively underestimate the capabilities of a road bike, this is all ridden by a trial pro, but give the idea of what a road bike with off the shelf kit is capable of

    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZmJtYaUTa0" target="_blank">

  10. #10
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    A land that time forgot
    My Bikes
    the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes
    Posts
    18,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    of course you can put road pedals on a cross bike -

    That's why they call them 'cross'. It's your bike, right? and your pedals? Unless you're concerned about image on group rides, who cares?

    go for it.
    "Evidence, anecdote and methodology all support planning for roadway bike traffic."

  11. #11
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,997
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BTM87 View Post
    I bought an entry level CX bike as a more versatile option to ride around town, hit crushed limestone trails in parks/forest preserves near me, that sort of thing. I don't have any immediate plans of getting into racing or anything.

    I really miss being clipped in though. I have an old pair of road shoes and look pedals/cleats - for my use is there any major reason not to use these that I'm missing? I know eggbeaters / spd seem to be preferred, but I'm not really racing, or encountering mud. I've searched a fair bit, and it seems the main concerns are being able to clip in on more than 1 side, and ability to clip in all clogged with mud, etc (which I don't really encounter too much of).

    Thanks for reading.
    I use a cyclocross bike for much the same things as you, and put a pair of Shimano A530 pedals on it. SPD clips on one side and platforms on the other side, so I can either wear my SPD shoes or just about anything else suitable for riding in (I did find it suboptimal the time I wore my flipflops to ride it to the bike shop, but since it's a 5-minute walk it wasn't an issue).

    SPDs are also handy when I'm out on a ride that involves hills I can't climb. It doesn't happen very often but when it does I'm thankful for the ability to get off and walk without looking like I crapped myself.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NW Chicago Burbs
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
    You massively underestimate the capabilities of a road bike, this is all ridden by a trial pro, but give the idea of what a road bike with off the shelf kit is capable of

    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZmJtYaUTa0" target="_blank">
    LOL I'm sure I am - I've nearly eaten it a few times however simply trying to ride across damp gravel where the front wheel digs in...stuff like that. I'm sure a better rider makes a bike much more capable, but I'm just out there for exercise and to have fun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bekologist View Post
    of course you can put road pedals on a cross bike -

    That's why they call them 'cross'. It's your bike, right? and your pedals? Unless you're concerned about image on group rides, who cares?

    go for it.
    Nah I don't really ride in groups, or care about image all that much (I probably have some of the hairiest legs out there). Just curious if there was a fundamental reason of "function" I shouldn't be using these pedals, since everything I came across said to use mountain pedals.

    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    I use a cyclocross bike for much the same things as you, and put a pair of Shimano A530 pedals on it. SPD clips on one side and platforms on the other side, so I can either wear my SPD shoes or just about anything else suitable for riding in (I did find it suboptimal the time I wore my flipflops to ride it to the bike shop, but since it's a 5-minute walk it wasn't an issue).
    This is kinda an interesting idea. As weird as it was riding on platforms and not being clipped in, it was kinda nice being able to just get on/off. I do prefer clipping in but this is something to think about when I get pedals for this guy.

  13. #13
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,400
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Marketing has anything with a wider 700c wheel called a 'Cross Bike',
    its already like the current era's 27"X1.25" wheel bike ..

    in the US putting straight, riser bars it's a " hybrid ", Europe Its A Cross Bike.

    I note: the actual racing has been removed to a separate Forum,
    since so few people who actually do Cyclocross have anything for them, here.

    Mods (Hint) maybe this one should be moved, to the touring forum..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 03-28-13 at 03:17 PM.

  14. #14
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,997
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BTM87 View Post
    This is kinda an interesting idea. As weird as it was riding on platforms and not being clipped in, it was kinda nice being able to just get on/off. I do prefer clipping in but this is something to think about when I get pedals for this guy.
    Personally I found the platform sides a bit disappointing, they aren't particularly grippy and having seen how I prefer to clip in (these are the first pedals I had that let me clip in) it's pretty rare that I want to ride any way other than clipped in. That said the first time I rode them in anger was on a 200k brevet and after about 150k my feet were a little sore so I appreciated the chance to flip the pedal over and get some respite (I subsequently tweaked my cleat positioning). Some folks, including a couple of the guys at my LBS, like to be able to use the flats when riding in heavy traffic or in the centre of town so they can put a foot down quickly, but I found it's become second nature to unclip before putting a foot down so don't feel the need there.

    What you can also get is a gizmo that clips into one side so you can put it on and take it off, and it will convert one side of a SPD pedal to a platform, and comes with reflectors etc.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    I use a cyclocross bike for much the same things as you, [...] SPD clips on one side and platforms on the other side, so I can either wear my SPD shoes or just about anything else suitable for riding.
    Ditto. Except I went with the Shimano M324, more weight, but more grip surface on the platform side.

  16. #16
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,400
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    QBP 'Problem Solvers' owns the distribution of the Decksters, an aluminum piece
    that takes a Spare cleat of what ever SPuD pedal you have, and creates a platform
    that can be removed when the double sided pedal makes more sense..

    http://problemsolversbike.com/produc..._pedal_adapter

  17. #17
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,997
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tlash View Post
    Ditto. Except I went with the Shimano M324, more weight, but more grip surface on the platform side.
    I specifically didn't get the M324 for two reasons.

    Firstly they are silver, which would look bad against a bunch of dark components.

    Secondly it seems you need a custom tool to be able to get at the bearings to overhaul them and from what I gather the custom tool costs more than the pedals do.

    I'm thinking I might dump the dual-sided pedals and go for pedals with SPD on both sides.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  18. #18
    Senior Member tarwheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    My Bikes
    Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL
    Posts
    6,486
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I use Shimano SPDs, PD-M540s, on my touring and commuter bikes. They work fine and are much easier to clip in and out of than single-sided SPDs. I wouldn't worry about the platform size if you have decent shoes.

  19. #19
    Slam That Stem. Sean Gordon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY; Portland ME
    My Bikes
    my roadie is all business
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Get SPD's

    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    I specifically didn't get the M324 for two reasons.

    Firstly they are silver, which would look bad against a bunch of dark components.

    Secondly it seems you need a custom tool to be able to get at the bearings to overhaul them and from what I gather the custom tool costs more than the pedals do.

    I'm thinking I might dump the dual-sided pedals and go for pedals with SPD on both sides.
    I use SPD's every single day, and I am a huge fan. I use them on all my bikes except my road bike, where I use Look Keo 2 Max (which are awesome)

    A lot of people poo-poo shimano SPD's, saying they're heavy, or they clog with mud too easily, and are difficult to service.

    The reason SPD's are different from all the other double bar-based MTB pedals is that Shimano was first on the scene, evaluated the problem tabla rasa, and developed (in my opinion) the most elegant, durable, and reliable design, and patented it. Its essentially a miniaturization of a Look road pedal or ski binding. Everyone else on the scene has had to work around Shimano's patent. Time, Look Quartz, and Crank Bros pedals all essentially the same mechanism, with a spring loaded bar engaging a detent on either side of the cleat.

    Mud - Yes, they can get clogged with mud, but most of their bad rap comes from the early '90's before they went to an open platform design. Time and Look Quartz pedals, and Cank-Bros Candy are no better at shedding mud. Crank-Bros Egg Beaters are definitely better at clearing mud because of their completely open design, but have other issues. This and their light weight make them popular with cross-racers.

    Cleats - SPD pedals are built with smooth steel ramp surfaces with excellent draft, facilitating easy entry. This allows them to use durable, steel cleats. many of the other 2-bar designs have less favorable draft at entry due to the round section of the bar. To combat this, Egg-beater style pedals require soft brass cleats, which are more lubricious but wear faster, especially if you walk in your mtb shoes OR if you just ride daily.

    Durability/reliability - I've seen quite a few broken Egg beaters. All of your pedaling forces go directly into the integrated retention spring. Candy's have a small platform for support, much like Time and Look Quartz pedals. All SPD pedals have a platform that the cleat rests on, much like a road pedal, whereas double bar designs generally put a lot of force directly from the bars to the shoe outsole, which eventually wears out and causes slop in the connection.

    Adjustability - SPD's have adjustable release tension, which is great for learning, or riding in traffic, or, for cycling right after a knee surgery

    Servicing - Yes, there is a special splined tool to remove the pedal spindle. However, you can get them apart just fine with a pair of pliers. The steel spindles are very high quality and you can't mark them up appreciably - also, by the time you find yourself repacking the bearings, they won't look so pretty anyway.

    Best part about SPDs or any MTB pedal system, you actually CAN take your bike to the grocery store.

  20. #20
    Delusional Laserbrain Germanicus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Orange, NJ
    My Bikes
    2008 Specialized Tricross, 1993 Giant Iguana rebuild w/ singlespeed drive train
    Posts
    396
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a CX bike for the same thing you do and I use Crank Brother Quattros which are a cancelled road platform with an eggbeater. You can check out the Candy pedal which is pretty much the same thing:
    http://www.crankbrothers.com/pedals_candy.php

    Workss great as a road pedal but you can take it into the muck if you want too.

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I switch between SPDs and Power Grips.
    Power Grips can be surprisingly good and will accept almost any shoe. They are not for everyone, but I like them.
    http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index.php/t-6204.html
    PowerGrips.jpg

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I watched this video yesterday. AMAZING

    Quote Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
    You massively underestimate the capabilities of a road bike, this is all ridden by a trial pro, but give the idea of what a road bike with off the shelf kit is capable of

    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZmJtYaUTa0" target="_blank">
    -- new to the world of Biking.. Please expect questions :)
    - Opus Sekhmet

  23. #23
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,637
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I LIKE CANDIES!

    on my "tourer", coupled with klein sandals I can walk w/o the hassle the usual cleats present.

  24. #24
    Senior Member User1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    454
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BTM87 View Post
    I bought an entry level CX bike as a more versatile option to ride around town, hit crushed limestone trails in parks/forest preserves near me, that sort of thing. I don't have any immediate plans of getting into racing or anything.

    I really miss being clipped in though. I have an old pair of road shoes and look pedals/cleats - for my use is there any major reason not to use these that I'm missing? I know eggbeaters / spd seem to be preferred, but I'm not really racing, or encountering mud. I've searched a fair bit, and it seems the main concerns are being able to clip in on more than 1 side, and ability to clip in all clogged with mud, etc (which I don't really encounter too much of).

    Thanks for reading.
    I kinda like being clipped in all the time too. What I've found to work is to use MTB shoes, preferably Sidi and also some Shimano MD76, and all with SPD cleats. I have a ton of cleats that I've collected from various sources, but they just gather dust. I never really wear any out. I use this setup for my road bike cause I really like being able to walk after riding, and very rarely am I just riding. This setup is used for my CX and MTB too. I didn't want to have a differing collection of shoes/pedals for different rides. I use bikes to get around as I'm car-less. Been that way for over 5 years. I don't see myself changing this setup for a long time, if ever.

  25. #25
    Junior Member del690's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Giant TCR, TCX, Trinity, Bowery, NRS
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get some pedals that are SPD on one side and flat on the other side. I have Wellgo's on my commuter bike so I can wear regular shoes to work or my cleats if I am going for a longer ride.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •