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-   -   Cyclocross Upgrades (http://www.bikeforums.net/recreational-cyclocross-gravelbiking/941820-cyclocross-upgrades.html)

rekon 04-05-14 05:29 PM

Cyclocross Upgrades
 
I understand my Jamis Nova Sport is a value orientated model and the manufacture probably takes short cuts and saves cost on various parts. My question is what upgrades should I do to my CX bike? Other than a raceface short stem, my bike is totally stock.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/59/d2zb.jpg

simonaway427 04-05-14 05:53 PM

a trade-in.

Its obvious that you bought a bike that's too big for you.

rekon 04-05-14 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by simonaway427 (Post 16644977)
a trade-in.

Its obvious that you bought a bike that's too big for you.

What do you mean too big?

jimc101 04-05-14 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rekon (Post 16645097)
What do you mean too big?

Your saddle is far to low indicating that the frame is too big for you (do a Google image search for cyclcocross bike to see what it should be). Needing to shorten the stem also indicates sizing issues.

For the 'short cuts' manufactures don't make these, they spec to a price point, if you wanted better spec'd parts, you buy accordingly.

For what to change, would make a list of all the components, and what you would like to change them to, vs buying a bike with them fitted, is it worth it before they have worn out?

rekon 04-05-14 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimc101 (Post 16645203)
Your saddle is far to low indicating that the frame is too big for you (do a Google image search for cyclcocross bike to see what it should be). Needing to shorten the stem also indicates sizing issues.

For the 'short cuts' manufactures don't make these, they spec to a price point, if you wanted better spec'd parts, you buy accordingly.

For what to change, would make a list of all the components, and what you would like to change them to, vs buying a bike with them fitted, is it worth it before they have worn out?

Thanks my LBS said most commuters just lower the saddle. The bike is comfortable but the saddle is low. Should I try to trade on for a bike that fits? Maybe I can just trade this for a better fit nova sport or nova race.

catonec 04-06-14 12:58 AM

why would a cyclocross bike come with reflectors?

rekon 04-06-14 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by catonec (Post 16645691)
why would a cyclocross bike come with reflectors?

Good question... not sure why my came with reflectors.

Kopsis 04-06-14 04:41 AM

What do you hope to achieve with the upgrades? Even the lowest-end groupsets from the big three (Shimano, SRAM, Campagnolo) function well and are very reliable. Upgrades get you reduced weight, better looks, and small improvements in function. None of those attributes is particularly important on a commuter bike.

As for fit, it does appear that your bike is too big. Commuters don't lower the saddle. There is an optimal saddle height for each rider that is roughly determined by leg length. Once that's set, riders who want a more upright position use a higher rise stem to get the bars higher relative to the saddle. With a short stem (another sign your bike is too big) you can't get much rise on the bars no matter what stem angle you use.

shelbyfv 04-06-14 07:07 AM

Folks are just pulling your chain:) If you are using the bike to commute, your components are fine. When something breaks or wears out, move to a nicer component if you want. If you are racing, any deficiencies will be quickly apparent. As for fit, it does seem you could have used a size smaller but what you do, if anything, depends on the circumstances of your purchase. If you just bought it and can return it/ exchange it with no financial loss, then that might be the way to go. If there is no return and you will lose money trading it, I'd ride it as is if you are comfortable. There are nearly as many opinions about proper bike fit as there are cyclists.

fietsbob 04-06-14 12:10 PM

You doing gravel fire-road trips and club rides , its fine . I have a similar amount of seatpost showing on my old CX bike
and I'm pretty much a tourist ..

if you want to compete in Cyclocross races next fall and winter ... N+1 get a competition Cross bike .. also..

Quote:

my LBS said most commuters just lower the saddle.
true as a survey of what people do, but that does not mean all of them make a wise choice..

seat to pedal distance is about getting a good leg extension at bottom of the power stroke..

not getting your foot on the ground when you stop.

what you may be envying is the more expensive components that come at a much higher price point ,
than what you were willing to spend in the original purchase ..

biggest cost cutting move was going to Asian companies to make the bikes , but that has been going on for so long
that all those investments of the various brand's importers, has had the contract manufacturers really raise their production

quality substantially ,. while still keeping the costs at the store end of the market reasonable ..

rekon 04-06-14 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shelbyfv (Post 16645967)
If you just bought it and can return it/ exchange it with no financial loss, then that might be the way to go. If there is no return and you will lose money trading it, I'd ride it as is if you are comfortable. There are nearly as many opinions about proper bike fit as there are cyclists.

I bought this bike a few months ago. I just talked to the LBS where I bought it from. The guy is going to talk to the owner to see if I can return it for a CX that fits properly and get back to me. He said if they are not able to do that they can give me $500'ish for the bike and I can pay the difference for a new one. If that's the case I would rather try my luck on Craigslist... We'll see what the LBS comes back with.

shelbyfv 04-06-14 01:56 PM

I don't know what you paid but msrp seems to be about $800. I doubt you could get more than $500 on CL. I've always thought Jamis bikes were good value but the website shows the next model up is $1300, for a Tiagra bike! That's crazy. Maybe they routinely are sold at huge discounts like Fuji and Kestrel?

rekon 04-06-14 02:48 PM

Also I want this bike for commuting but I also want to enter in some local competitions.

inkandsilver 04-06-14 04:07 PM

Hoping for a simpler solution here: is it possible the bike is not too small, but rather your saddle is too low for your leg length? Have you read about basic fitting in terms of saddle height? If not, that's worth a try before you do anything else.

rekon 04-06-14 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by inkandsilver (Post 16647239)
Hoping for a simpler solution here: is it possible the bike is not too small, but rather your saddle is too low for your leg length? Have you read about basic fitting in terms of saddle height? If not, that's worth a try before you do anything else.

Ya I tried that... If I raise the saddle anymore it would straighten my leg.

rekon 04-07-14 09:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shelbyfv (Post 16646948)
I don't know what you paid but msrp seems to be about $800. I doubt you could get more than $500 on CL. I've always thought Jamis bikes were good value but the website shows the next model up is $1300, for a Tiagra bike! That's crazy. Maybe they routinely are sold at huge discounts like Fuji and Kestrel?

Cannondales Tiagara bike is about the same price.

bikemig 04-07-14 09:08 AM

I wouldn't be so quick to decide whether the bike is too small for the OP. I like to see more seatpost as well but there are a lot of variables that go into bike fitting. Plus a lot of pros won races without much more seatpost showing than what the OP has showing.

Agree that upgrading makes little sense. A 2d set of wheels might make sense depending on the OP's use of the bike (e.g., one set for commuting and general riding, and another for racing or riding hard).

bbarnett51 04-07-14 09:48 AM

I don't know about the fit bc I have no idea what size you are and maybe the seat is too low.

As for upgrades, don't worry about it until you notice something not working. I've been doing 15 to 40 mile MTB trails and training for a century with some 60 mile road rides and I'm completely happy with the stock bike. I put on a different saddle but that's it. I'll upgrade later if I see I'm at a disadvantage.

Too much emphasis on bikes and components and not enough on the rider in my opinion. Go ride, you will love it.

rekon 04-07-14 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bikemig (Post 16649048)
I wouldn't be so quick to decide whether the bike is too small for the OP. I like to see more seatpost as well but there are a lot of variables that go into bike fitting. Plus a lot of pros won races without much more seatpost showing than what the OP has showing.

I also would like more seatpost. Do you have an example of bikes without much seatpost?

rekon 04-07-14 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbarnett51 (Post 16649198)
I don't know about the fit bc I have no idea what size you are and maybe the seat is too low.

5'6...

fietsbob 04-07-14 11:32 AM

Quote:

Ya I tried that... If I raise the saddle anymore it would straighten my leg.


heel of your foot on the pedal. leg straight is about the right height,

so when the ball of the foot is on the pedal the knee bend is adequate.





Quote:

Do you have an example of bikes without much seatpost?


look up pictures of pre WW2 & late 40's race bikes .. fit theory changes with time..


Quote:

5'6"
that all legs?

can you stand bare foot over that top tube .

bikemig 04-07-14 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rekon (Post 16649474)
I also would like more seatpost. Do you have an example of bikes without much seatpost?

What fietbobs said; look at pics of racing bikes in the 40s and so on. Theories have changed. Top tube length is, IMO, more important since it dictates your center of gravity. There comes a time when the seatpost is too large but as long as you clear it (and the OP's pic shows that he or she does), then you're good. I'd be more concerned about the relatively short stem (assuming that the stem length is correct).

shelbyfv 04-07-14 12:39 PM

I think you should just ride your bike and enjoy it. After you've ridden it for a year or so you will know if you want something different and more importantly, why. You have the bike, you are comfortable and if you sell/trade you will lose money. If you are disturbed by the comments about your bike fit, go to the Rivendell site. They are strong proponents of bikes that fit like yours.

bikemig 04-07-14 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shelbyfv (Post 16649921)
I think you should just ride your bike and enjoy it. After you've ridden it for a year or so you will know if you want something different and more importantly, why. You have the bike, you are comfortable and if you sell/trade you will lose money. If you are disturbed by the comments about your bike fit, go to the Rivendell site. They are strong proponents of bikes that fit like yours.

No. 1. Absolutely ride it and enjoy it. It takes a while before you know what works well for you and what doesn't.

rekon 04-07-14 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 16649669)


that all legs?

can you stand bare foot over that top tube .

Yes to both.


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