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Recreational Cyclocross and Gravelbiking This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

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Old 05-04-14, 01:37 PM   #1
auburn2005
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Buying a road wheelset for Trek Crossrip LTD, neep help!

I'm a complete newbie when it comes to cycling. I recently purchased a Crossrip LTD and I have loved it!

In addition to doing some gravel riding a light trail stuff, I have also been taking it on longer road trips (30+ miles) and I think I could benefit from a road wheelset.

Here are the wheels that came standard:

Wheels
Formula DC91 alloy front hub; Formula DC38 alloy rear hub w/Bontrager Nebula Disc 32-hole rims

Tires
Bontrager H5 Hard-Case Ultimate, 700x32c





So my specific questions are:

1. Would a road wheelset be helpful for me for longer road rides?

2. Current bike has disc brakes (Tektro HYRD cable/hydro brake) - I'm assuming this will affect my choice of wheels?

3. Does anyone have any specific recommendations of exactly what I should get? I'm not trying to spend a fortune (if possible )

Thanks!
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Old 05-04-14, 02:29 PM   #2
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Hi and welcome to Bikeforums.

You will need mountain-bike wheels with a 135mm wide rear hub spacing. What is your budget?
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Old 05-04-14, 04:59 PM   #3
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Hi and welcome to Bikeforums.

You will need mountain-bike wheels with a 135mm wide rear hub spacing. What is your budget?
Thanks, and thanks for the reply!

I'd like to keep it under $500 - I'm assuming that's possible.

I'm not questioning you, I'm just trying to understand why I would need mountain bike wheels? Is it because of my rear hub spacing? Or the disc brakes?

Would the mountain bike wheels defeat the purpose of trying to have an easy swap out for road tires?
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Old 05-04-14, 06:26 PM   #4
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So I've been looking around and been finding things like these

A lot of times I can't find any specifics on the rear hub spacings? Another thing I've come across, would I have to remove the actual disc from my current wheels and put on the new wheels? Or buy wheels (hubs?) with those already included?

I know these questions may be very basic, but I'm still learning
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Old 05-04-14, 06:40 PM   #5
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Disc brakes on road bikes are still a pretty new thing so there aren't many dedicated road disc wheels yet. However, there are lots of mountain bike disc wheels. BUT mountain bike disc wheels sometimes have a max pressure limit (like 50 psi) so a road tire (requiring 100 psi) wouldn't work anyways. You would need another set of "discs" (called rotors) for the road wheelset ... it'd be a pain to transfer those over. You can buy individual rotors.

Sorry, I don't have any specific wheelset suggestions. A trek dealer could get you another set of the wheels that came with the Crossrip. Wouldn't be an upgrade, but would make wheel switches easier.

For $500 you could almost get a dedicated road bike. Something to think about.
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Old 05-04-14, 06:58 PM   #6
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Disc brakes on road bikes are still a pretty new thing so there aren't many dedicated road disc wheels yet. However, there are lots of mountain bike disc wheels. BUT mountain bike disc wheels sometimes have a max pressure limit (like 50 psi) so a road tire (requiring 100 psi) wouldn't work anyways. You would need another set of "discs" (called rotors) for the road wheelset ... it'd be a pain to transfer those over. You can buy individual rotors.

Sorry, I don't have any specific wheelset suggestions. A trek dealer could get you another set of the wheels that came with the Crossrip. Wouldn't be an upgrade, but would make wheel switches easier.

For $500 you could almost get a dedicated road bike. Something to think about.
Okay, thanks. Starting to get a better picture of what I need to look for now.

One more question, will I need to get new hubs? Do those typically come included with wheels?
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Old 05-04-14, 09:53 PM   #7
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For less than $500 you can easily have a very nice set of wheels built. I would look at something like Shimano Deore hubs laced to a rim like the Velocity A23, how many spokes would be dependent on your weight. Something like that would be extremely nice and well below your $500 limit.

To the question of it being worth it to you is hard to judge and purely based on your finances, type of riding you are doing, how much you value a little extra efficiency etc. Personally, those tires you posted would be good enough that I would do nearly all of my riding on them unless you are getting into faster group rides.
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Old 05-04-14, 11:46 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auburn2005 View Post
Thanks, and thanks for the reply!

I'd like to keep it under $500 - I'm assuming that's possible.

I'm not questioning you, I'm just trying to understand why I would need mountain bike wheels? Is it because of my rear hub spacing? Or the disc brakes?

Would the mountain bike wheels defeat the purpose of trying to have an easy swap out for road tires?
Yes, the combination of disc brakes and the 135mm spacing built into the frame means that you must use mountain-bike hubs. Don't let the term Mountain-bike bother you, these hubs perform very well and help make for a strong wheel. Combining a Mountain-bike hub with a 23mm, or wider, Road-bike rim would provide a small improvement in road speed. The option provided below is a good one;

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For less than $500 you can easily have a very nice set of wheels built. I would look at something like Shimano Deore hubs laced to a rim like the Velocity A23, how many spokes would be dependent on your weight. Something like that would be extremely nice and well below your $500 limit.

To the question of it being worth it to you is hard to judge and purely based on your finances, type of riding you are doing, how much you value a little extra efficiency etc. Personally, those tires you posted would be good enough that I would do nearly all of my riding on them unless you are getting into faster group rides.
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Old 05-05-14, 12:48 AM   #9
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Well now I have to figure out if true road slicks would be worth it. I may give it a few more long rides on the tires I'm currently using.

Thanks for the recommendation, where would I get those built? Would a lbs do that if I came in with the parts or is that something I could do myself? I'm not even sure exactly what goes into building them... adding the spokes?
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Old 05-05-14, 06:09 AM   #10
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Well now I have to figure out if true road slicks would be worth it. I may give it a few more long rides on the tires I'm currently using.

Thanks for the recommendation, where would I get those built? Would a lbs do that if I came in with the parts or is that something I could do myself? I'm not even sure exactly what goes into building them... adding the spokes?
The easy way to tell if a it is worth it could be to buy the road tires and put them on your current rims and then if you really like the change you can decide if it is worth the cost of an extra set of wheels/cassette/brake rotors is worth not having to constantly change tires.

To get them build obviously biased but I build custom wheels (link in my signature). There are lots of others out there like myself if you search around, just tell them what you are looking for. You can also ask your local bike shop if they have experience building wheels and then tell them what you would like, the last option is to build them yourself. If you are mechanically inclined and patient it can be a lot of fun building your first set of wheels.
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Old 07-05-14, 04:03 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by auburn2005 View Post
I'm a complete newbie when it comes to cycling. I recently purchased a Crossrip LTD and I have loved it!

In addition to doing some gravel riding a light trail stuff, I have also been taking it on longer road trips (30+ miles) and I think I could benefit from a road wheelset.

Here are the wheels that came standard:

Wheels
Formula DC91 alloy front hub; Formula DC38 alloy rear hub w/Bontrager Nebula Disc 32-hole rims

Tires
Bontrager H5 Hard-Case Ultimate, 700x32c





So my specific questions are:

1. Would a road wheelset be helpful for me for longer road rides?

2. Current bike has disc brakes (Tektro HYRD cable/hydro brake) - I'm assuming this will affect my choice of wheels?

3. Does anyone have any specific recommendations of exactly what I should get? I'm not trying to spend a fortune (if possible )

Thanks!

Hey, I also have an LTD and am looking to do the same. I'm using the stock wheelset with some wide (40mm) off road trail tires and would like a second wheelset for the road. My LBS is looking into options for me, but right now it looks like Velocity and Reynolds both have good options. Check out the Velocity A23 Comp and Pro Disc wheelsets or the Reynolds Stratus Pro Disc wheelset. You can get the SRAM PG 1050 11-32 cassette for $60 on Amazon, and the TRP HY/RD 160mm rotors for $29 each on the TRP site. Let me know what you end up doing, I'm still shopping but hope to make a decision soon.
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Old 07-05-14, 05:55 PM   #12
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Hi guys, this is exactly what I am wanting to do, good all round bike for general use with some additional fast tires and/or rims for the long road rides, now if only I could find one to fit....
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Old 07-05-14, 07:28 PM   #13
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Just get fast rolling smooth tires like the Michelin City. In the 35 c, it rolls fast. No need to go to the expense of an extra wheelset.... and wider tires will be more comfortable on rough roads and potholed streets...
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Old 07-06-14, 04:28 AM   #14
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On the "is it worth it question" ... my "rain bike" (a '92 Schwinn Crisscross) is running heavy Conti 37c touring tires. At the same level of effort on a solo ride I'm about 1 MPH slower on a 30 mile ride than on my carbon road bike running 25c training tires. The difference is more noticeable on a fast group ride trying to keep pace with the surges and occasional sprints. I live in Florida, so I can't speak to the effect on climbing. Bottom line is you'll notice the difference and it might make some of your riding more enjoyable, but a road wheelset won't make you hugely faster.
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Old 07-06-14, 08:06 AM   #15
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There are several tires that prove exceptional performance on pavement while still being wide enough for firmer gravel that is well maintained. These lighter tires are not super flat resistant or durable like a city tire, but the low rolling resistance, light weight and ride quality are superb. I've been using the Parigi-Roubaix for the last 1000 miles with one flat. They proved the speed of a top quality 700x25 training tire and the ride quality is like floating on a cloud. They are wider than labeled, about 30mm.

Challenge Parigi-Roubaix: Paris-Roubaix

Challenge Strada Bianchi: Strada Bianca

Compass Grand Bois Cypress: Compass Bicycles: 700C Tires
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Old 07-17-14, 05:18 PM   #16
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I have the CrossRip Comp, I replaced the wheelset with some Boyd Altamont Disc, put Bontrager AW2 25's with some tuffy liners. Light, failry puncture resistant and much faster than the 32's. I also replaced the brakes with the TRP Spyres. Much nicer ride and a lot faster commute.
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Old 07-18-14, 08:47 AM   #17
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+1, no need to get new wheels , just get some really nice slick tread tires ..

add RBW jack brown 33.3333 wide tires to the list started in 15th reply ..
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