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  1. #1
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    Trail-a-Bike with no Quick Release Hub -- What to carry to fix a flat?

    I recently purchased a Adams Trail-a-Bike to take my 5-year old out riding. We're starting to go longer distances so I'm wondering what tool to carry to take the wheel off in case of a flat. Unfortunately, the wheel is held on by a couple of nuts and doesn't have a quick release hub. I'd prefer not to carry around a normal sized wrench due to the size but not sure if there are any other options. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    You need to take the wrench. Also tire levers, a pump, a patch kit, and a spare tube. If you can see the puncture site and it is not near the valve you may be able to patch without removing the wheel. Get the patch kit with glue, not the peel-off glueless patches..they don't work as well. If you have to take the wheel off you may prefer to slap a new tube on, and decide on patching the old when you get home. Also take a tether for the kid for while you're working...this last is discretionary.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    I have a pump bag that goes under my top tube. That is where I carry my pump and the wrench for the trailerbike. I installed a seatbag on the trailerbike to carry the spare tube for it. Penzoil has a Fix-A-Flat for bicycles that works very well that my wife carries when she bike commutes. Of course, once you use it on the ride, you should replace the tube once you get home.
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    Park Tools make a set of slim low profile open ended wrences that would be easy to carry around.

  5. #5
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Forget the wrenches, just replace the bolts with a quick release skewer.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...eid=&pagename=

  6. #6
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cierrecart
    Park Tools make a set of slim low profile open ended wrences that would be easy to carry around.
    Wrong tool. Those are cone wrenches for adjusting bearing preload on hubs. They will NOT handle the torque for a axle nut.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  7. #7
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    You will likely need a new axle if you want to add a quick release. Most often if the wheel is secured with nuts, the axle is solid.

  8. #8
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    The stubby open end-box combination wrenches fit a very small seat pack. And you can put your foot on them and put as much power as needed. Sears has some good ones. I use one for my track bike, it's even a full polish wrench.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan
    Wrong tool. Those are cone wrenches for adjusting bearing preload on hubs. They will NOT handle the torque for a axle nut.
    Well I guess I was wrong about Parek, but I know they are made.

  10. #10
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Try this it's tiny. Very nice quality.

    Stubby combination wrench. Metric size 15mm. 12 pt. openings. 4-5/8 in. long. Easy-to-clean fully-polished finish keeps tools looking great. Headlockô box ends spread turning force throughout entire head of nut or bolt, won't round off corners; plus, wide profile delivers greater leverage. Hot-forged, heat-treated to exceed ANSI specifications for strength and tolerance. Guaranteed forever!
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    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  11. #11
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cierrecart
    Well I guess I was wrong about Park, but I know they are made.
    I was correcting the correct application of Park's cone wrenches. When tuning hubs, they work perfectly, but trying to use them to remove wheels, you'll bust your knuckles and then the wrench.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  12. #12
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
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    I carry a pretty small adjustable wrench. Does the job. Just make sure the nuts haven't been there for so long that they are practically molded with the axle - or so it feels. When that happens, you need a HUGE wrench and a lot of WD-40 to get the nuts off.

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