Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 13 of 16 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast
Results 301 to 325 of 377
  1. #301
    Sprint the hills! djgonzo007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    South Pasadena, CA
    My Bikes
    Klein Q-Pro w/Campy, Dahon MU P8
    Posts
    611
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mcbengie
    Good catch Joe, yes I am one of the founders of Electra. I am very glad to see an intrest for the Townie ... and I like to read eveybodies opinion, because it will help us to make better bikes and get more people to ride.
    Great bike IMHO. Just bought two last week. I bought my wife one because it is so easy to ride. She hadn't ridden a bike in 10-15 years and was very afraid of falling off. She absolutely loves her Townie24! Two days after I bought hers I liked it so well I bought a Townie 24 for myself. It's perfect for pulling our two children around in our Trek "Go Bug" and for cruising.

    I don't know if I'm a serious cyclist since I don't compete and what not but I do own a Road Bike that I log 100 miles a week on.

    It's nice to have a bike like the Townie that I can just jump on and ride, not having to "suit up" like I do on my road bike. Thanks for a great bike!
    Last edited by djgonzo007; 07-17-06 at 06:41 PM.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    '06 Klein Q-Pro with Campy
    '09 Dahon Mu P8

  2. #302
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    My Bikes
    several types
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Great bike path for Townie owners

    Just stopped by to say my wife and I are still enjoying our Townie's very much(3rd season). We have traditional mountain bikes also but the Townies' get the most use. Last year we rode the Hiawatha bike trail or should I say we coasted, it's all down hill. Many trestle bridges and tunnels and a buss ride back to starting point. Also rode West to East (water front section) along Lake Coeur d' ALene to Harrison, Id. This is a 73 mile long bike path and we have seen both ends, but it is so beautiful we're going back. I would highly recommend this trail as a outing(vacation) for anyone with a bike. Because the path follows an old rail bed, Townies are the perfect bike. Note to Townie, this would be a great place to have Townies available for rental. IMHO Here is a link. http://www.friendsofcdatrails.org/
    Last edited by willysworker; 07-24-06 at 07:07 AM.

  3. #303
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So I have been enjoying my new townie, but tonight I got my 2nd flat in 3 rides! I have been doing 11 mile rides on a clean paved bike path, so I dont think Im abusing it in that manner. I'm 230lbs so that might have something to do with it, but it still seems odd. Im running the stock rims/tires with 65psi of air in them. Are they just lousy tubes/tires?

  4. #304
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    My Bikes
    Trek FX 7.5, Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    New to this forum with questions for Townie owners: will the Townie 8 have a higher gearing than the Townie 7D? My wife has the latter and I want a Townie for my own. I only wish I could get a higher gear for pushing a higher speed on the flats and downhills. Does anyone have a comparison between the 8 and 7D from the perspective of speed?
    Last edited by carta; 08-15-06 at 09:02 AM.

  5. #305
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by carta
    New to this forum with questions for Townie owners: will the Townie 8 have a higher gearing than the Townie 7D? My wife has the latter and I want a Townie for my own. I only wish I could get a higher gear for pushing a higher speed on the flats and downhills. Does anyone have a comparison between the 8 and 7D from the perspective of speed?
    I'd guess there will not be a big difference in the "stock" set-ups. But, it would not be difficult for the dealer to make some changes if you want to alter the gear range. For example, on my bike with a four-speed Nexus hub, I could get higher gearing by switching to a smaller cog in the rear. But, the trade-off would be, all four gears will be higher. The gear I was using on steep hills would be harder to pedal.

  6. #306
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    My Bikes
    Trek FX 7.5, Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, Alan. I had a chance to ride a Townie 8 this afternoon while my LBS was replacing my Trek 6700's knobbies with some narrower slick-center / knobby-outside tires. I found it heavier and not quite as nimble as the Townie 7D. The repair guy showed me that my seat was way low on my Trek; he raised it 3.5 inches--and all this time I thought my leg extension was nearly straight. He moved the seat back and tilted it back, all of which was more comfortable than the original set-up.

    Long story short, I rode like the wind when I got it home. Just to compare, I upped the seat in my wife's 7D and that felt better. Not as fast on the flats, but it felt more natural than my Trek.

    I'll order a Townie 7D in Vivid Blue and co-exist with both bikes. I think this comfy bike thing is going to be my main bike for most of my riding. It's fun. (Why isn't riding my Trek fun? Probably because I'm not on dirt and rock with it but I've domesticated it to city and county roads.)

  7. #307
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    My Bikes
    Trek FX 7.5, Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mcbengie...where art thou? After all of the grief I read resulting from his brief interlude with this forum, I invite him to return. Not for more grief but to tune into our feedback about his bicycles. I, for one, love my time spent with the Townie 7D. I take it out in preference to anything else. It's my wife's bike and so I've placed an order at my LBS for the men's style frame of the Townie 7D. BTW: she hadn't ridden in 35 years. Now she's putting the miles in on the Townie with a big grin on her face. Now she can join me and our boys in our rides.

    Having the company president hanging in this forum is a great opportunity to make valuable comments about our experience with his product. How many opportunities do we have having the ear of someone who could consider changes to his or her product line, based on our reported experiences?

  8. #308
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey guys, not everybody wants to race or do a century. I'm quite happy with 15 mile rides on a local creekside trail (flat) on a Sun EZ Sport. I'm comfortable, have no pain, get a good sweaty workout, lost 50 lbs, and have no exposure to cars. At the far end of the ride, I'm sitting at the edge of San Francisco bay in a wildlife refuge. It's Priceless. Yes, My goal is 20 milers at the end of next year. But I don't care if I don't get there. That's it; it doesn't have to be carbon/ti to be real.
    Last edited by bkaapcke; 08-25-06 at 09:03 PM.

  9. #309
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    3,398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a forum basically for Rans owners but promoting "crank forward" design bikes:
    http://www.crankforward.com/

  10. #310
    Senior Member trestlehed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    San Diego, California
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Heckler (mtb), EZ Sport LE (recumbent), (2) Townie 24 speed bikes w/beach cruiser bars "The Holy Grail of Beach Cruisers"
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    The Townie 24 is the Holy Grail of Beach Cruisers

    After spending buccu dollares on modifying a 1988 Giant Iguana into a comfort/beach bike, and then buying a 2002 Specialized Expedition hybrid, I got frustrated with uncomfortable bikes and bought a Sun/Easy Racers EZ Sport LE recumbant. Beautiful and comfortable bike. But heavy, hard to transport and unable to make evasive maneuvers at speed to avoid meandering morons on their way to the Hometown Buffet. So after nearly a year of skepticism, I test-rode a Townie 24. I didn't like the handle bars. So after studying the bike I realized it was meant to have beach cruiser bars. I had the bike shop put on the stock Electra cruiser bars and I was in LOVE. The stock Electra seats suck donkey balls, so I put on a Hobson Easy Seat II for comfort. No more numb private parts. The stock pedals also s.d.b.: my left pedal started seizing after 1.5 months of riding. But after the relatively minor modifications, I got the Townie up to "Holy Grail of Beach Cruisers" status.

    I also ride a Santa Cruz Heckler full-suspension rig that I've ridden in Moab, Crestted Butte, Durango, Downieville and my local rides in and near San Diego including Noble Canyon. I'm not claiming "Hard-core" status, but I am claiming that I like to ride and I like to ride a lot of different bikes in different
    environments.

    I know the "Hard-Core Cyclists" on this RECREATIONAL & FAMILY THREAD, have said that "The Townie is not a real bike and real bike riders don't ride them".
    Uhh. O.K. Have fun shaving your legs and inhaling car exhaust.

    The Townie has a beautifully crafted, lightweight aluminum frame. But for what they charge for the bike, I think they could have done a much better job with the components as well as the pedals and seat. This bike is best suited for almost everyone: the average recreational rider who likes paved bike paths, or the avid rider who needs a barcalounger to relax on.

    I ****ing LOVE this bike.

    Leg-shavers may remain in their little self-important, image-driven elitist world.

    Thank you Electra, for figuring it out for many of us who have been searching for too long.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by trestlehed; 04-24-10 at 04:17 PM. Reason: .

  11. #311
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whew... I have read the entire thread.

    1. I used to be an avid mountain biker, but I have ridden less and less over the past few years (and have put on a few pounds to prove it).
    2. Age and a very bad upper back (t5 compression) have caught up with me. I get extreme numbness in my right hand on my mountain bike and it is very tough on my back.
    3. I would like to commute to work 8 miles each way.
    4. My commute to work is almost completely downhill. My commute haome would be a gentle uphill ride except for the last very steep mile.

    I am currently strongly considering a Townie 8 700c (wish it came in black) withe the Nexus 8 and dynamo hubs. I have only test ridden a few 26 inch models and not on any hills. My wife has completely fallen for the bike so I will be purchasing a pair.

    I will probably initially drive the first couple miles to work and park to eliminate the big hill home while i get my legs back.

    Will the Nexus-8 (and flatfoot frame) ultimately be adequate for my return home? Any other recomendations for a good commuter bike that can handle the climb and my poor aching back?

    Thanks in advance.

  12. #312
    wannabe cycling nerd djtrackie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    My Bikes
    Giant TCR Comp 3
    Posts
    369
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Townie is a great bike. It is very relaxed and EASY for the back. However, I would not recommend tackling extended hills with this bike.

    I bought my gf one, and even I like riding it around every once in a while. While it rides great, it is tough to grind uphill on. If you like standing and putting your weight on the pedals, this is not the bike for you. It is quite awkward standing up on this bike

  13. #313
    Senior Member trestlehed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    San Diego, California
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Heckler (mtb), EZ Sport LE (recumbent), (2) Townie 24 speed bikes w/beach cruiser bars "The Holy Grail of Beach Cruisers"
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Murph man,

    Wrote:
    <
    I am currently strongly considering a Townie 8 700c (wish it came in black) withe the Nexus 8 and dynamo hubs.
    The Nexus hubs are VERY EXPENSIVE compared to a standard derailieur drive train.
    I recommend the Townie 21 speed or 24 speed if you are going to tackle any hills.
    You will be able to ride up those hills and have extra money for beer at the end of your ride...

    And I agree with djtrackie: even though (the Townie isn't built to ride up STEEP hills), it can be done.
    Moderate hills are not a problem.

  14. #314
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    georgia
    My Bikes
    Caloi MTB, Raleigh heritage international
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Whew!

    I googled electra towney and found this thread, I read though all 13 pages! I am 49 and have been riding bikes since I was a child. I've had a murray "10 speed" 2 peugots, a ross, a viner, and now a raliegh international and a jamis nova. I had a couple of nice mountain bikes but do not like being stuck in the same postion, road biking is more comfortable to me, except for the wrecks.

    I consider myself a pretty serious bicyclist and today I just dropped some coin on an Electra Towney, I got one with 27 inch wheels. I got it because sometimes I don't like to ride fast, it would be nice to just hop on the bike without my shoes gloves and riding diaper. I only live 2 miles from work and plan on riding my towney to work. I used to scoff at beach cruiser riders until I realized they were out having fun and enjoying the outdoors, and while they were not exerting themselves as much as I do on a good fast ride they are still out getting a little exercise and having fun. Riding was starting to become a chore for me and the towney is a way of making it fun again. Now I realize the beach cruiser gang is on to something and differant types of riding are not mutally exclusive, I can enjoy crusing as much as my fast bikes. I like the look of the electras and townies as well.

    I will later post pics to prove I am not a towney executive to statisfy the buzz kills in this thread.

  15. #315
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Availibility in LBS

    There is no LBS in my area that stocks the Electra Bikes. A 200 mile round-trip for tune-ups and warrenty work does not work for me.
    Locally we have the Trek Sole Rides, Cadillac L-3, and the Raleigh Gruv's. I live in a pretty much flat area.
    The Gruv does not have an option for an internal hub.
    Is there a quality difference between the Trek and the Raleigh products?
    I plan on doing some test-driving this week, and may even go out of my area to look at the Giant Suede bikes, just to get a feel for the crank-forward options.
    I enjoy this forum and want to thank all the contributers.

    Nelson

  16. #316
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    IL-USA
    Posts
    1,607
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger B
    Besides Electra Townie, who else makes flat footed bicycles
    Roger
    I know a couple, but before we get into that, allow me to explain:

    One of the most-common complaints of bicycles is saddle pain, no doubt. Especially among casual riders. Because of the angles that the legs have to reach down towards the pedals, conventional bicycle seats cannot have a large area to support the rider's weight. So you sit on the nose of the saddle until your groin forces you to dismount, or until you essentially destroy all the nerve endings down there.
    Fun fact: upright-bicycle saddles are so UNcomfortable that they are not used on any other type of vehicle or seat.
    If you're young and you can take it, great! Get out there tiger. But if you can't or don't want to ride in pain anymore, then I'd urge you to not go and buy the same thing. There's common problems people have with bicycle riding (sore butt, numb hands, neck pain) and all "normal" bicycles cause this, and there's no minor accessory you can put on that will fix it. If you buy the same old thing, you're gonna get the same old problems.

    The concept of moving the pedals forward is simple: it would allow the rider to slide a bit further back on the seat, where there is more area to comfortably support the rider's weight. There are even sold--customized "noseless" seats, but these don't work well on "normal geometry" bicycles, because the legs have to extend downward too much during pedalling of a typical bicycle, so the rider slides off the front edge of the seat.
    ------
    A number of companies have tried to do this cheaply, while still using a normal bicycle seat. The Electra Townie is one such example, and to that end I don't think it's a really good choice. Most cheaper bikes like this have problems because they feel a bit better than normal, but they do not go far enough to really solve the problems. The pedals are not moved far enough forward of the seat, and they still try to use "normal" upright bicycle saddles.

    At the moment, there is only one company making bicycles that solve both problems well, and that is the Sport Series offered by RANS ( http://www.ransbikes.com/ ). The lowest-priced model is the Fusion, for $950. It has three advantages in that 1) it places the pedals far forward of the seat, 2) it uses a seat that is designed for the intended riding position [-the seatpost and seat -mounting bracket it does not accept regular bike seats at all-], and 3) it uses a tall stem and short handlebars (more on this below). ....RANS will sell the Sport Series bikes through mail order, but the recumbents you must go through a dealer to get.

    There are two other bikes that "come close", for less money:
    ---the Sun SunRay for about $425 ( http://www.sunbicycles.com/sun/recum...y/ezSunRay.htm ) places the pedals far forward and it has a properly-designed seat, but it uses a short stem and tall handlebars. The disadvantage of this is that you cannot pull hard on the handlebars to pedal if you want--they will slip in the stem clamp. I haven't seen a SunRay up close, so I don't know if it will accept regular bicycle saddle clamps (and saddles) or not. Sun considers the SunRay a semi-recumbent, so it's listed in the recumbents on their website.

    ---the Lightfoot Surefoot for about $750 ( http://www.lightfootcycles.com/surefoot.htm ) places the pedals far forward, but falls short with its tall handlebars and upright-style saddle. The saddle could be replaced with a noseless saddle however, because sliding off the front wouldn't be a problem. If you have extreme groin issues and want a setup that minimizes pressure there, then the Surefoot with a Moonsaddle mounted pointing "backwards" would be one possible setup: http://www.moonsaddle.com/
    -------------
    I own a RANS Fusion and it's easy to ride and much more comfortable than a "normal" bike, everyone who has tried it has noted as much. I left my "normal" bicycles a few years back for recumbents however, and the Fusion is not as comfortable to ride as a recumbent is. Recumbents take a bit of practice to get used to however. I bought the Fusion partly as a "guest bike", because people who wanted to go riding with me (but who had no bicycles of their own) could not simply hop onto a recumbent and ride around in traffic. With the Fusion, they have no problems getting on it and going, and it's comfortable enough that they will still willingly ride for a couple hours at a casual pace of 10 mph or so.

    Two lower-priced recumbents to consider are the Sun EZ-1 and the Cycle Genius Starling, both cost around $600. Recumbents are a bit more hassle to transport, but the comfort differences are simply HUGE. Recumbent riders for one example do not wear padded shorts, because they don't need them. The reason I don't think the Townie is a good deal is because for what a Townie costs, for a bit more you can get a low-end recumbent--and most of the discomfort you get on an upright bike doesn't ever happen on a recumbent.
    ~
    Last edited by Doug5150; 11-25-06 at 06:56 PM.

  17. #317
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    3,398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From http://crankforward.blogspot.com/

    Crank-Forward Manufacturers

    RANS
    Sun (Hybrid Sport)
    Electra (Townie & Cruisers)
    Trek Bicycles (Pure line)
    Cannondale (Daytripper)
    K2 Big Easy (sold at REI & LL Bean)
    Del Sol (Lowboy)
    Giant (Suede 2006)
    DeVinci (Lifestyle)
    Phat Cycles (Chopper)
    Schlick Cycles (Chopper)


    My experience reflects some of what the above post said. I had a Trek Sole Ride (like a Townie) but now have a Rans Fusion which is much more comfortable.

  18. #318
    Seņor Mambo
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fremont, CA
    My Bikes
    Bike Friday, Bridgestone MB-6 700c, Ti-frame Xtracycle, RANS, Brompton, Dahon, Downtube IXFS, ex-Birdy & a recumbent pedicab.
    Posts
    1,343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug5150
    ... they have no problems getting on it and going, and it's comfortable enough that they will still willingly ride for a couple hours at a casual pace of 10 mph or so.
    At only 10 mph, it would seem almost any upright - with a cushy seat - would do.[1] To test this theory, you'd need a regular upright though - a beach cruiser, for instance.

    While I am definitely a RANS fan, $1000 for an occasional use "guest bike" is too rich for me. But I bet your friends are better than mine, too.


    [1] Of course this also assumes a handlebar height which is higher than the seat as opposed to one adjusted for racing.

  19. #319
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    They are beach town cruisers that are comfortable in that context. Personally, I prefer Sun's EZ Sport. But that's just me, ornery as they come.

  20. #320
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    3,398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lightfoot Surefoot crank forward
    http://www.lightfootcycles.com/surefoot.htm
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #321
    Glider Rider
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Cologne, Germany and Palm Beach, Florida
    My Bikes
    Personally Designed
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Townie Designer

    Didn't I read somewhere, ELECTRA unabashedly admits that the Townie was created by an Italian clothing and fashion designer?!? That would give my knees pause!

  22. #322
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To help people learn about crank forward bikes (Townies etc.), I have started this blog: http://crankforward.blogspot.com/

  23. #323
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    3,398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CruiserBob
    To help people learn about crank forward bikes (Townies etc.), I have started this blog: http://crankforward.blogspot.com/
    The above site is a good one. It has good information for someone considering a purchase of a crank forward type bicycle.

    This blog has been discontinued in 2007.
    Last edited by scottogo; 01-05-07 at 05:49 PM.

  24. #324
    Roadie onespeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Granbury, Texas
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Gran Sport, Trek, Schwinn, Fuji
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cranky Bearings

    At about 300 miles my Townie 7 crank bearings gave out. The dealer was quick to fix it at no charge. He claimed that he replaced the sealed Electra bottom with an upgraded unit. All is well now and I am still really enjoying the bike. However, I went though this forum and have noticed that several members had bottom bracket problems. Does anyone know what Electra is using as the stock bottom crank bearings? Who makes this so called sealed unit?

  25. #325
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Paoli, Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
    Posts
    9,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by scottogo
    Lightfoot Surefoot crank forward
    http://www.lightfootcycles.com/surefoot.htm
    Must admit that I was shocked at the pricing on the Lightfoot. The cheaper 750 model that uses very average components is $750. The bike is very much like the Raleigh Gruv 1, which lists at $305. Or which did list at $305 in 2006. It's not in their 2007 lineup.

    Those custom, low-volume frame prices are killers though.

Page 13 of 16 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •