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Old 03-24-08, 06:42 PM   #1
rhong
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Which Trek Bike Navigator 200, 7200, or 7.2FX?

Just getting started in recreational riding and want to get a headstart getting in shape to keep up with my grandsons. From a points incentive promo I have the choice between the Trek Navigator 200, the 7200 or the 7.2 FX. I want a good all around bike. Predominently I will ride on paved roads, but there will be occasions when I would be going off road on some woodland trails (not Mtn biking) and then I will also be riding on the beach.

I like that the 7200 has a front suspension but I'm concerned about the thinner tires of the hybrids. Are the 700 x 35c tires too thin for comfortable beach and off road trail riding?

I feel like the Navigator would be a great all around bike but I've read that it would be a much slower street bike with the stock tires and rims. I've also read that it could be refitted with thinner tires making it faster on the road.

I'm definetly want to start riding for fitness so I will be doing more street riding than anything. It seems to be logical and reasonable low cost option to buy another set of wheels for the navigator and have the best of both worlds (within reason). Comments?
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Old 03-25-08, 10:14 AM   #2
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I started off with a Trek 7.2 FX and even used it in a 10-mile duathlon last year (trail riding and road riding). Tires do fine on reasonable bike trails and even gravel as long as you don't beat on the bike. I don't think I'd be brave enough to try sand, however...
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Old 03-25-08, 10:27 AM   #3
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Is any bike "good" on sand?
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Old 03-25-08, 10:40 AM   #4
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Is any bike "good" on sand?
Not really. It's like riding in thick snow or non-sticky mud. Alot of wasted energy and very poor steering control. Of course, the harder the sand the better. Bigger tires help but in the end, you want to stay out of it.
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Old 03-25-08, 11:00 AM   #5
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Let's break this down for you.
A trek with the 700 x 35, can go both larger and smaller based on your needs.
What is he tlking about?

When you may want to ride faster you may put a 28 on the wheel or travel on gravel or hard pack a 38-40 may make you feel softer.

The front shocks on the bike do help, but add lots of weight to the bike. Climb a hill and you will wish that you didn't have one.

These bikes are NOT meant for
The beach, wheels too small and the sand will crap up the bike, chain, gears. Besides some beaches ban bikes.
Do not use these bikes for mountain biking. You will eventually crack the frame, damage the crank or derailers.
You can ride them on grass, gravel, dirt, but be careful, the tires are NOT mountain bike tires, so gripping is an issue.

What can you do on these bikes.
Commute
Centuries
Touring
Shopping
Meeting Girls.

I owned one and use it somedays when my road bike is in the shop or rainy.
I did many centuries, climbed many mountains and commuted with it.

If you want to go fast, then these are not the right bikes. But speed is relative.

I hope this helped
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Old 03-25-08, 08:49 PM   #6
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Is any bike "good" on sand?

I fully agree with you about riding in the sand but when you have grandkids it's hard to avoid and most beaches along the Atlantic coast have extremly hard sand. Riding on these is not much different than ride on pavement.
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Old 04-02-08, 03:32 PM   #7
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Riding on sand is the fastet way to ruin a bike that I know. It quickly gets into everything and you cannot get it all out. I took my recumbent for a ride once in Santa Cruz and had a good ride. Unfortunately, sand is everywhere in a beach town, so I have never done that again. Avoid this except for cheap bikes that you don't mind watching deteriorate quickly. bk
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Old 04-06-08, 01:59 PM   #8
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I'd get the FX bike. My wife had a hybrid but it was holding her back. The heavy front suspension was worthless, so was the suspension seatpost. Her 7.5FX is fast, can climb anything, and has 700 x 32c tires which can go off-road if needed. I added barends to give her another hand position.

Heck, I take my singlespeed with 700 x 25's on dirt roads and trails all the time. A bit rough but if the bike can take it, so can I.
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Old 04-07-08, 05:58 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by rhong View Post
Just getting started in recreational riding and want to get a headstart getting in shape to keep up with my grandsons. From a points incentive promo I have the choice between the Trek Navigator 200, the 7200 or the 7.2 FX. I want a good all around bike. Predominently I will ride on paved roads, but there will be occasions when I would be going off road on some woodland trails (not Mtn biking) and then I will also be riding on the beach.

I like that the 7200 has a front suspension but I'm concerned about the thinner tires of the hybrids. Are the 700 x 35c tires too thin for comfortable beach and off road trail riding?

I feel like the Navigator would be a great all around bike but I've read that it would be a much slower street bike with the stock tires and rims. I've also read that it could be refitted with thinner tires making it faster on the road.

I'm definetly want to start riding for fitness so I will be doing more street riding than anything. It seems to be logical and reasonable low cost option to buy another set of wheels for the navigator and have the best of both worlds (within reason). Comments?
I bought a 7.2 FX in February. I've put about 500 miles on it, and I like it very much. It rides nicely on smooth pavement, and it can handle rough pavement (there's a lot of that around here) and well-packed unpaved surfaces. It's a good all-around bike.

That said, I'm not sure that tire size and width make much difference in speed. My old bike, with 26x1.75 tires @ 50 psi, is about as fast as the 7.2 FX with 700x35 tires @ 80 psi. I don't want to turn this thread into another debate about which tires are fastest--but if you test ride all three bikes and decide you like the Navigator best, go with the Navigator. The speed of the bike will depend more on you than anything else.
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Old 04-07-08, 10:31 AM   #10
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Good thoughts on the maintenance issues with sand. Same will be true for wet conditions.

700cx35mm tires will be fine for sand, thinner would work also as others mentioned.

Suspension is nice but I don't think it is always appropriate. As other poster mentioned, they can be cheaply made and perform poorly. Although it sometimes takes experience to realize that. If you have not driven before and you get yourself a yugo, you can think it is one of the greatest cars in the world. After some experience and trying other things you may decide you want something a little more specific to your driving needs (racing, touring, family transport, work, etc). Same for bikes. My opinion is that shocks are not needed for the majority of folks riding at this level. Spend the money on a better frame, components, helmet, clothing, shoes, etc. Put wider low pressure tires on to give that little bit of shock absorbancy. The shock unfortunately is being pushed as a safety/comfort item and somewhat as a status item. It is unfortunate because they really are not necessary for around town light trail riding. Now if you were riding the cobblestones of europe on a daily basis, I'd say you would be well served with a shock.
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Old 04-07-08, 11:16 AM   #11
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Thanks for all the info, end up with a Trek Pure Sport

Thanks for all your helpful information. During my research I found a friend that had bought an Electra Townie last year. Due to back surgery he hasn't been able to ride a bike in 20 years without pain in his back and hips, until he rode a Townie. So I looked into the "flat foot" style crank forward biles.

Found out one of my catalog choices was the Trek Pure Sport. It had all the goodies the Townie had and then some. FedX delivered it Saturday.

I'm really impressed with Treks' quality. They say they assemble and test the bikes before the shipped them and based on my experience with reassembly that has to be true. It took me about an hour to put the seat, handle bars and front wheel back on and all the alignments seem to be perfect. I'm sure I'm going to need to tweak the seat and handle bar height and reach adjustment some from from my initial ride up and down the driveway (long driveway) I already know I'm going to like riding this bike.

From info I got from the forum I got concerned that the big tires on the Navigaotor would make it too slow on the road. The Pure Sport comes with smaller Bontrager Cruiser tires in 26 x 1.90" @ 60 psi, 21 speed with supposedly higher quality components than the Townie. It's a good looking bike. The wife's is suppose to be delivered this week. Thanks again for all your help.
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