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  1. #1
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    Any tire on a rim or does it matter?

    Hello. I currently have 26x1.5" tires on my wife and my bike. The max PSI is 60psi but I think we'd be better off going with something a bit wider and with a higher psi rating.

    Can I just go and get some 26x2 or something like that that holds more air? Do the inner tubes need to be changed or do I keep those and just air them up more?

    Sorry I'm new to the whole bike thing and I don't ride that often.

  2. #2
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    A 26x2 will fit on the rim. You will need the correct size tubes.
    Wider tires will have the same or slightly lower pressure.
    Example:
    fat tires ~ 45-60psi
    skinny tires (road bike tires) ~ 100-130 psi
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

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  3. #3
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    I see. So will putting a wider tire on the rim help with weight distribution? I'm just scared that we're going to wear out our tires/tubes Doesn't putting a wider tire also smooth the ride out some?

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    Senior Member deraltekluge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    Hello. I currently have 26x1.5" tires on my wife and my bike. The max PSI is 60psi but I think we'd be better off going with something a bit wider and with a higher psi rating.
    What are you hoping to accomplish by the change? What do you mean by "better off"?

  5. #5
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    I see. So will putting a wider tire on the rim help with weight distribution? I'm just scared that we're going to wear out our tires/tubes Doesn't putting a wider tire also smooth the ride out some?
    All tires wear out eventually. Do car tires last forever?
    Get quality tires and watch when riding through glass and debris on the road and they'll last a little longer.
    Please DON'T ROTATE TIRES like car tires. YOU WANT TO BETTER TIRE ON THE FRONT.
    When you replace the rear tire, which will wear out first (most of the weight is on the rear tire), discard the rear tire, put the front tire on the rear, and put the new tire on the front.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

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    I didn't say I thought tires would last forever. I'm well aware of how tires wear because I've been fixing up cars for almost a decade. Bikes are new to me.

    What I'm trying to say without just coming out and saying it my wife and I are 200+ and I don't want to ruin my tires because of that.

  7. #7
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Read through the Clydes & Athenas forum. Those folks are all over 200#. Tires are not nearly as important to them as wheel strength.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

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    Those people have tons of money in their bikes. They have more money in their wheels/tires than I have in my whole bike! I was just asking if I could go bigger on the tires without having to buy wheels.

    I swear every answer on this forum is "Visit your LBS" or "Buy this $500 tire!"

    I posted in the "recreational" forum because some of us just want to ride a bike on the weekends with our kids without spending a small fortune on something we're going to use maybe 20 times a year.

    If we were talking about my car that I use to get back and forth to work everyday, then yeah, I'd get higher end stuff. The tires on my truck are $800 for the set not including mounting and balancing.

  9. #9
    dbc
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    Generally speaking, with a heavier load, you'll want to use a wider tire.

    When on the bike, the tires should deform a bit (for comfort), but not so much that the tire bottoms out.

    As noted before, the wider tires tend to have a lower psi rating. But this doesn't necessarily mean that they will deform more (be softer) - the larger volume of the tire takes care of this. After all car tires are only about 30 psi or so.

    Have someone check out your tire deformation while you are on the bike. If it seems excessive, consider bumping up to 1.7" or 1.9".

  10. #10
    Senior Member grayloon's Avatar
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    The 1.5's are more than sufficient for your weight. At 250, a 1.5 Tioga City Slicker did quiet well. I run 1.25's on my 27" wheel touring bike with not flat or weight problems and would not hesitate to put another 40 lbs on the rear. The larger a tire, the lower the pressure. If you wanted faster, higher pressure tires, you could probably do just as well with 1.25 tires if your use is on paved surfaces.

  11. #11
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    I swear every answer on this forum is "Visit your LBS" or "Buy this $500 tire!"

    I posted in the "recreational" forum because some of us just want to ride a bike on the weekends with our kids without spending a small fortune on something we're going to use maybe 20 times a year.
    I thought sure I said that the 26x2 tire will fit on the wheel you have. You just need to get the appropriate size tubes.
    Tubes are $5 each at the shop I work at. Not exactly a "small fortune".
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  12. #12
    Senior Member grayloon's Avatar
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    You are really something. No one said go to your LBS. One said that the Clydes are more concerned about wheel strength than tire size...a very good response, BTW. I mentioned a particular bit of rubber I put on my bike, cost about $20, same size as your current tires and said it worked fine at my then weight of 250 lbs. It seems you want a particular answer and haven't stated clearly the question. Ask for advice and you will get it, but don't go slamming people for what was not posted. It may also help if you go buy a good book on bicycles and bicycle maintenance as it appears you don't want answers that don't fit your particular little world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grayloon View Post
    You are really something. No one said go to your LBS. One said that the Clydes are more concerned about wheel strength than tire size...a very good response, BTW. I mentioned a particular bit of rubber I put on my bike, cost about $20, same size as your current tires and said it worked fine at my then weight of 250 lbs. It seems you want a particular answer and haven't stated clearly the question. Ask for advice and you will get it, but don't go slamming people for what was not posted. It may also help if you go buy a good book on bicycles and bicycle maintenance as it appears you don't want answers that don't fit your particular little world.
    Your answer came after I posted up. I didn't post up after you posted so I don't know why you're saying I didn't like your answer. Your answer actually answered my question in that you said:

    The 1.5's are more than sufficient for your weight. At 250, a 1.5 Tioga City Slicker did quiet well. I run 1.25's on my 27" wheel touring bike with not flat or weight problems and would not hesitate to put another 40 lbs on the rear.
    This DID answer my question. However, this came after my last post in the forum so I don't understand why the second post by you.

    I was referring to the fact that in searching the forum BEFORE I posted it seems that every question asked on here is either "Don't buy this because it's junk and not a high end product" or "Visit your LBS and have them help you".

    My LBS is full of jerks who like to make snide comments to people who might want an entry level bike instead of a $2,000 Trek so I can't just go to my LBS.

    I understand wheel strength is important. My wheels probably in the future will need replacing but then again maybe not since I stick to paths and roadways.

    The second post in the thread answered a question I had that I didn't ask and didn't think was important. It makes since that a wider tire can do more with less pressure due to higher surface area.

    I'm sorry if I came off as rude or uncalled for but I guess it was frustration with the bike community as a whole.

    I'll see if I can find a beginner's bike book or something at Books A Million when I go there in the next couple of days.

    Thanks for the input!

  14. #14
    Senior Member grayloon's Avatar
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    If I misread your post, I apologize. You are right that there are many on the B.F. that don't have much consideration for those who just want to enjoy their bikes, not invest a fortune. That's one reason I hang more in the Classics and Vintage forum, like to look at the Utility forum, and enjoy the rec one from time to time. I reserve Advocacy for expressing myself usually.

    As for a good bike maintenance book, that does come in handy. Mine are all old, like my bikes...my youngest bike is a 96, the two I prefer to ride are an '83 and an '87. Other's may point you to a newer book that will help, not only with repairs, but understanding both terminology and how bikes work. The latter two things are almost, if not more important than knowing how to do repairs. It allows you to visit that local shop from a position of understanding the lingo.

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    Try to sum it up =]

    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    Hello. I currently have 26x1.5" tires on my wife and my bike. The max PSI is 60psi but I think we'd be better off going with something a bit wider and with a higher psi rating.
    It is all a trade off. In general wider tires will ride smoother (softer ride), and go over rough terrain better, while lighter skinnier tires take less effort and tend to roll better faster on smooth firm terrain.

    I noticed in a lower post you were worried about your weight. There are plenty of heavy people (some overweight, others just tall and built) on skinny road tires. I personally wouldn't change tires based on your weight, change only if you want something either to roll faster (skinnier), or more cushy to ride (wider).

    Normally the wider the tire the lower the max PSI it will hold.

    The tire will deflect to a patch size based on PSI. Obviously PSI refers to Pounds per Square Inch. Therefore the tire deflects down until the patch size area equals the weight on the wheel divided by the tire pressure. For example if a wheel has 100 pounds of weight on it, and it has 100 PSI of pressure, the tire patch will equal 1 square inch.

    Can I just go and get some 26x2 or something like that that holds more air? Do the inner tubes need to be changed or do I keep those and just air them up more?
    2" will hold the same or less air, take ever so slightly more effort to ride (in general, there are exceptions), but be more comfy. Be sure to get the correct tube for the tire width. Most rims that will hold a 1.5" will hold a 2", but I'd take one to the store to make sure. Also make sure it will fit in your frame.

    Sorry I'm new to the whole bike thing and I don't ride that often.
    We all start somewhere...

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    There are some limits on how wide (or narrow) a tire will safely fit on how wide (or narrow) inner width of the wheel rim.

    A standard chart is at LINK. Scroll down to nearly the bottom of the page for the tire size range vs rim width table.

    For more about tires, tubes, wheels or most anything else about bicycles, a visit to the late Sheldon Brown's site is in order. For most everything you need to know about tires and tubes, go to LINK.

  17. #17
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
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    Yes, Sheldon Brown: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html

    My wife and I are 260lb and 215lb. On our exotic tandem her weight is carried by a single 20"x1.5" tire in the front and most of my weight is carried by the 26x1.5" rear tire. A pair of 26"x2" tires at 60 psi on a single bikeare almost overkill in my humble opinion. For correct tire pressure see the numbers on the sidewalls of the tire. I suggest that if you get pinch flats when you are inflated to the correct pressure and are on a smooth road then go to fatter tires.
    Last edited by ken cummings; 07-26-08 at 10:33 PM.
    This space open

  18. #18
    Senior Member grayloon's Avatar
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    The type of tire makes a difference too. Mountain bike tires with aggressive tread are not going to be as comfortable on paved surfaces as a road slick. If riding paved surfaces, stick with a road type tire for comfort.

  19. #19
    Hey guyz? Guyz? Wait up!! Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    Hello. I currently have 26x1.5" tires on my wife and my bike. The max PSI is 60psi but I think we'd be better off going with something a bit wider and with a higher psi rating.

    Can I just go and get some 26x2 or something like that that holds more air? Do the inner tubes need to be changed or do I keep those and just air them up more?

    Sorry I'm new to the whole bike thing and I don't ride that often.
    Oooo you better take them tires off of your wife!! (Kidding)

    I started out with a comfort bike as my first bike and I'm considered an Athena (Clydes/Athenas). This bike has pretty durable wheels (higher spoke count than some road bikes) and wider tires (with less air pressure). This bike was $439 new.





    The tires on it are what is called "semi-slick" where the tread is not as knobby as a mtb tire but just a tad more knobby on the sides. I can use this for paved roads and a little bit of non paved trail riding. Nothing TOO rough, though - there isn't enough knobs on it for full dirt use.

    Perhaps something like this would be to your liking. Bontrager comfort hardcase tires. 26x1.95

    Last edited by Siu Blue Wind; 07-27-08 at 01:13 AM.
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  20. #20
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    Forget about it and go and ride in peace. It will make no difference whatsoever. Wider will only slow you down. Heavy people ride on narrow road bike tires just fine, so a tire as wide as yours is not a problem. If you want smoother, put on a seat that has springs.

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    Awesome input guys! I think we're going to ride on these a bit more and see if we have problems. We rode about an hour and a half yesterday with no problems so I might have been jumping the gun to change out the combination I have now.

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    If you really wanted to make a tire change, I suggest going with the same size, 26x1.5 and just get ones that can handle higher pressure. 26.x1.5 are a really good sweet spot in my opinion. These Specialized Nimbus tires will give you flat protection and 80 PSI max pressure.

    Good luck and more importantly ride your bike!

    As a frugal purchaser myself, I generally wear out what I have first, then replace it with a part I have done research on. Unless of course the part isn't worn out but is not functioning properly, then it should be replaced anyhow.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Siu Blue Wind View Post
    The tires on it are what is called "semi-slick" where the tread is not as knobby as a mtb tire but just a tad more knobby on the sides. I can use this for paved roads and a little bit of non paved trail riding. Nothing TOO rough, though - there isn't enough knobs on it for full dirt use.

    Perhaps something like this would be to your liking. Bontrager comfort hardcase tires. 26x1.95
    Those are very similar to the tires on our bikes now. Road style in the middle with small knobs on the side.

  24. #24
    Senior Member grayloon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdub01 View Post
    Those are very similar to the tires on our bikes now. Road style in the middle with small knobs on the side.
    Those tires are not the best of either world. They don't help on loose surfaces much and can invite disaster in sharp turns. If you only ride paved surfaces or hard packed dirt, slicks work well.

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