Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    America's Hometown
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    little help with seat position

    hello,

    just looking for a little advice.

    just recently started riding again and did my firs "longer" ride the other day (about 15 mi, fairly flat).

    the ride was fantastic, but by the end my "end" was completely done for!

    i have a trek 7000 with a stock seat. now my legs are kinda short so jacking up the seat post (as someone at the local trail suggested) is not an option.

    i guess my question is are there other adjustment i should try, or just go for a new saddle (perhaps a woman specific one)?

    also, my bike is a hybrid, so it comes with the suspension seat post, ive heard some not great tings regarding the suspension posts, should I consider replacing the post as well?

    thanks in advance for any suggestions.

    -jellen

  2. #2
    GATC
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    south Puget Sound
    Posts
    6,620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a pretty useful checklist to run down:

    http://www.bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm

    (I think just riding more is generally the best solution though)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Silverexpress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Berkley, Michigan
    My Bikes
    Commuter(s), MTB(s), bent(s), folder(s) and a road.
    Posts
    593
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whatever saddle you get make sure of 3 things...

    1. Make sure your "SIT" bones are supported. Take a measurement of the distance between these two bones, and make sure that whatever saddle you get is wide enough to support them. Don't go to wide or else you'll restrict your movement or induce chafing in your inner thighs.

    2. Make surethe seat is adjusted properly
    There are three more things to look for in detail.

    A. Height: adjust it so that you have a slight bend in the knees when your
    foot is parallel to the floor. Also take note that it is the ball of your foot that
    should contact your pedals. You do this by placing the crankarms directly
    vertical of the floor. With a foot on the lowest pedal take note of the bend in
    the knee. Again, it should be a slight bend; in fact, you should start with the
    seat too high and then work your way done about 1/8 of an inch each time.
    You'll know it's too high when your butt moves side to side as you try and
    reach for the pedals. Also you'll hyperextend your legs. You don't want your
    butt moving side to side. Lower the seat in increments until you have just a
    slight and comfortable bend in both knees, and when you pedal your butt
    stays firmly seated.


    B. Fore & Aft - after doing the above make sure a knee is directly above your
    pedal when the crankarms are placed horizontal to the ground. If it falls
    behind the pedal, then you need to move the seat forward. If it falls
    forward the pedal, you have to move it backwards.

    C. The seat is level. Once you've got the above mastered, ride the bike
    around and see if your either sliding back or forward on the seat. Adjust
    the tilt accordingly so this does not happen. This may affect the above so
    you might need to go back and readjust...

    3. The third thing to make sure of is the type of seat: There are many. From my own experience; the cushier, the worst. If it's gel, the fluid often times gets squished out from where it should be over time. If it's padding, it wears out overtime and your sit bones will be resting on the hard unforgiving plastic shell. Get rid of that comfort seat.
    Last edited by Silverexpress; 08-07-08 at 07:50 AM.
    Regards,
    Jose

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    America's Hometown
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the info, I'm playing with the seat position now!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Silverexpress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Berkley, Michigan
    My Bikes
    Commuter(s), MTB(s), bent(s), folder(s) and a road.
    Posts
    593
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry for the typos, and wierd logic. I typed the reply out on my dinky treo smartphone. Anyhow, I've edited it.
    Regards,
    Jose

  6. #6
    Recreational Commuter
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Central Ohio
    My Bikes
    Two brand-less build-ups.
    Posts
    1,002
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is a really good post. However, there is a lot of differing opinion about bike fit, and everyone has a favorite saddle. (One or more. I have two, one for commuting, and another for riding fast and far. The "fast and far" one has less padding.)

    My thoughts/clarifications/commentary inserted...

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverexpress View Post
    Whatever saddle you get make sure of 3 things...

    1. Make sure your "SIT" bones are supported. Take a measurement of the distance between these two bones, and make sure that whatever saddle you get is wide enough to support them. Don't go to wide or else you'll restrict your movement or induce chafing in your inner thighs.
    Absolutely critical. You may be OK right now on this score, depending on where it hurts. If you have two distinct points of pain, one on each posterior cheek, that hurt more when you sit on a hard flat surface, and the pain is deep you may be OK for the saddle design and fit (or pretty close), you just need to get accustomed to longer rides.

    If it hurts more "in the middle", you've got a problem, but the solution may still lie in seat adjustment, so read on.

    2. Make surethe seat is adjusted properly
    There are three more things to look for in detail.

    A. Height: adjust it so that you have a slight bend in the knees when your
    foot is parallel to the floor Also take note that it is the ball of your foot that
    should contact your pedals. You do this by placing the crankarms directly
    vertical of the floor. With a foot on the lowest pedal take note of the bend in
    the knee. Again, it should be a slight bend; in fact, you should start with the
    seat too high and then work your way done about 1/8 of an inch each time.
    You'll know it's too high when your butt moves side to side as you try and
    reach for the pedals. Also you'll hyperextend your legs. You don't want your
    butt moving side to side.
    You also don't want to have to point your toes, your ankle should be in a comfortable neutral position.

    Lower the seat in increments until you have just a
    slight and comfortable bend in both knees, and when you pedal your butt
    stays firmly seated.
    You can get pretty quickly into the ballpark by doing as above, but putting your heel on the pedal. Then adjust up or down from there. It's just another "rule of thumb" way of getting close to start with.

    B. Fore & Aft - after doing the above make sure a knee is directly above your
    pedal when the crankarms are placed horizontal to the ground. If it falls
    behind the pedal, then you need to move the seat forward. If it falls
    forward the pedal, you have to move it backwards.
    The "knee above pedal" thing (sometimes called KOPS or "Knee Over Pedal Spindle") is another "rule of thumb" that will get you in the ballpark, it is not an absolute truth. If you find yourself sitting forward toward the "nose" of the seat (so that your sit bones miss the wide part of the seat), move the seat forward. If you feel "crowded", move it rearward. Not much, 1/4 to 1/8" at a time.

    C. The seat is level. Once you've got the above mastered, ride the bike
    around and see if your either sliding back or forward on the seat. Adjust
    the tilt accordingly so this does not happen. This may affect the above so
    you might need to go back and readjust...
    Or just measure it with a level. The idea is that it has to be horizontal in order for you to sit on it. Nose-up, and you'll put pressure where it doesn't belong. Nose-down, and you'll be sliding forward, missing your sit-bones, and putting pressure where it doesn't belong. I would get the seat level before worrying about fore-aft.

    3. The third thing to make sure of is the type of seat: There are many. From my own experience; the cushier, the worst. If it's gel, the fluid often times gets squished out from where it should be over time. If it's padding, it wears out overtime and your sit bones will be resting on the hard unforgiving plastic shell. Get rid of that comfort seat.
    Actually, the worst thing about "cushy" seats is that the padding tends to wad or push up between the "sit bones", putting pressure where it doesn't belong.

    Also remember that the fore/aft adjustments effect the seat height as well (since the pedals stay in the same place, moving the seat forward makes the distance from the pedal to the seat a little shorter.) Measure the height that works with a tape measure, and use that measurement, rather than a mark on the seatpost.

    The final thought from this quarter is that, as you ride more, and get better at riding, the adjustments may change. You body musculature will change, perhaps only a litttle, and you find that a seat position that was fine at the beginning of the year is now not comfortable anymore. Listen to your body and adjust accordingly.
    Riding the Ohio MS Central Ohio Challenge tour, July 12th.

  7. #7
    Recreational Commuter
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Central Ohio
    My Bikes
    Two brand-less build-ups.
    Posts
    1,002
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Silverexpress View Post
    Sorry for the typos, and wierd logic. I typed the reply out on my dinky treo smartphone. Anyhow, I've edited it.
    You wrote all that on a Treo!?! Good man! (How do your thumbs feel?) ;-)
    Riding the Ohio MS Central Ohio Challenge tour, July 12th.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Silverexpress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Berkley, Michigan
    My Bikes
    Commuter(s), MTB(s), bent(s), folder(s) and a road.
    Posts
    593
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've built up the muscles on my thumbs. They don't hurt anymore...hehehe. What gets me is the size of the screen. I often loose track of what I've typed, and especially when I get interrupted.

    Here is more info on saddles...

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html

    He....lives on.....
    Last edited by Silverexpress; 08-07-08 at 08:54 AM.
    Regards,
    Jose

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    America's Hometown
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I still cant get over that all being typed on a treo!

    impressive

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •