Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need Bike that hold 350 pounds.

    Hello everyone,

    My husband is buying 4 bikes for the family for our new spending time together as a family and to support him to loose weight. We found out that he needs a bike from a bike shop wish are more than what he was planing to spend.

    He wanted to spend around $400 in the 4 bikes at toyrus or walmart but with his weight of 350 we had to go to a bike shop. I knew they are spensive(at least for us) but I know they are worth it.

    The problem is that he still want to buy the bike at walmart or toysrus and I'm very afraid of him getting hurt. He said that he could by a bike for $100 and buy the extra wheels in a bike shop and only spend $200 for everything. My feeling is that he is risking his life for saving $200. Am I right or will he be save with his idea?

    Thank you very much everyone.

  2. #2
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas
    Posts
    10,495
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Visit the Clydesdale subforum, which is the "large" people forum.

    I think he'd be ahead to pick up a better bike in the first place. I don't know that he's risking his life so much as asking for a headache.

    I started out with a $100 mountain bike from Academy. I had it about a year. I had continuing problems trying to get the derailleurs adjusted right, and the brakes got steadily worse over a year's time. I did have to replace the rear wheel twice, both times when I took it offroad. But all in all, the bike was a source of frustration, and there was several months in there when I just didn't ride at all. I gather from my experience and that of others, that the basic frames of cheap bikes aren't all that weak, it is the wheels, as you indicated. But it's the overall performance that is aggravating.

    A bike may seem expensive. If you pay $400 and then ride it an hour every day, that's a little over a dollar an hour over a year's time. That's a lot cheaper than eating out or going to the movies, even cheaper per hour than driving a car. The key is using the bike. If you buy a Walmart bike for $100, ride it two hours, then throw it in the garage, you've spent $50 an hour to ride it.

    Something else, if I may suggest it. Forget the idea of family time together with the bike. To lose weight, you need to put some effort into riding. For a large person new to riding, this may still be fairly slow. But the point is, if you tootle around the neighborhood at 5 mph with the kids, you're going to be burning fewer calories than you would just walking. If he wants to lose weight, with biking being a part of that, he just needs to get out for an hour or so in the evenings and ride at what seems to him a good clip, and get a good workout. That may be slower or may be faster than what you and the kids ride. Then have a time to tootle around with the family before or after that.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you very much StephenH for the extra advice too.

  4. #4
    I STILL miss East Hill :) Rollfast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Where my bike's at
    My Bikes
    a lot
    Posts
    2,561
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I buy all my groceries at once then there is 350 lbs on the bike. So far a Western Flyer is holding all 280 of me but my grocery getter is trying to TACO the rear wheel. Stronger wheels can be found but the BEARINGS on some of those Wally World Specials stink. Take your time and fit your needs. Remember that tricycles usually don't turn BOTH wheels and do not provide an advantage for carrying cargo or for traction. I about had to go to the hospital ON 'Hospital Hill" when I took a Tri-star up without a head start...

  5. #5
    Senior? Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    My Bikes
    GMC Topkick mountain bike, Schwinn World Traveler, GMC Denali road bike
    Posts
    271
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seriously, tell your husband to spend $300 or so on a bike at a bike shop. I currently ride a GMC Denali road bike, and, while it's ok, if I had more money, I would have bought better quality. You see, when you buy a cheaper bike, it's not just the rims that are cheaper, it's everything. As for my Denali, I recently had to replace a spoke and have the rim trued. It cost me about 15 bucks to have it done. To have the rim replace with something stronger would be about $100. So logically, why spend $300 or so on a cheap bike, and upgrades, when a better bike could be purchased for $300-$400? BTW, you will get MUCH better repair service on the bike purchased at the LBS, rather than Wal-Mart(service? What service?).

    Don't get me wrong-I like my Denali. But I also realize it's the bottom of the barrel when it comes to road bikes, so I don't expect great things from it. BTW, it needs to have the gears adjusted. Common on all bikes. But since I didn't buy from an LBS, ALL repairs are to be done by me, or me paying someone to do them. Most bike shops throw in one or two gear adjustments with the purchase. A bike shop will also help fit your husband to a bike. I don't know if you noticed, but most people, when buying a bike a Walmart or wherever, just stand over the bike and go, "Yep, this one will work!". I wonder how many of those people continue to ride after purchase.
    As someone pointed out, tell your husband to look in the Clydesdale forum. He will find lots of information there.

  6. #6
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas
    Posts
    10,495
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On the gear adjustments, you'll see a lot of Walmart-type bicycles for sale that "needs tuneup". The reason is you can adjust these things, go ride them, and they need more adjustment. That's why I switched to a single-speed.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Sin City, Nevada
    My Bikes
    Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, Wizwheelz 3.4 trike, Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB
    Posts
    721
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I first took up cycling as an adult many years ago, I went out looking for a used bike and came across two that were nearby and within my limited budget. One was a Schwinn 10 speed probably weighing 40+ pounds and the other was a French Fiorelli road bike weighing 29 pounds and with the low end Campi components on it. Luckily I chose the Fiorelli. I'm pretty sure I would soon have given up on the Schwinn. It taught me that a quality bike is a pleasure to ride, not just a chore. No matter what you do with a mass-merchandiser bike, it will never work as good as even the lesser quality bike store bike. You can often pick up an older road bike off of places like Craigslist. Just make sure the frame is the right size for your height and the tires aren't real narrow as your weight will limit how light a wheel you can get by with.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    127
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
    When I first took up cycling as an adult many years ago, I went out looking for a used bike and came across two that were nearby and within my limited budget. One was a Schwinn 10 speed probably weighing 40+ pounds and the other was a French Fiorelli road bike weighing 29 pounds and with the low end Campi components on it. Luckily I chose the Fiorelli. I'm pretty sure I would soon have given up on the Schwinn. It taught me that a quality bike is a pleasure to ride, not just a chore. No matter what you do with a mass-merchandiser bike, it will never work as good as even the lesser quality bike store bike. You can often pick up an older road bike off of places like Craigslist. Just make sure the frame is the right size for your height and the tires aren't real narrow as your weight will limit how light a wheel you can get by with.
    fiorelli is italian...not french.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA
    My Bikes
    riders:Schwinn Continental ('80), Specialized Crossroads Sport ('07), Schwinn Super Sport (73), Schwinn Superior (76), Projects: Schwinn Sprint ('74), Trek 800 & Schwinn Continental ('71)
    Posts
    524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Vickyniki View Post
    My husband is buying 4 bikes for the family for our new spending time together as a family and to support him to loose weight. We found out that he needs a bike from a bike shop wish are more than what he was planing to spend.

    He wanted to spend around $400 in the 4 bikes at toyrus or walmart but with his weight of 350 we had to go to a bike shop.
    Welcome and it is great that your husband is wanting to spend family time and has selected biking as part of this time.

    He will loose weight biking, as he will walking, and many other fashions of movement, and it will come quicker if he combines activities.

    You have received great advise already.

    A option regarding a bike option that has been touched on, is following up on the used option via CVraig's List in your area, or even local bike shops (LBS) in your area that are aware of your needs and price range.

    You did not share your hubbies height(?), as this will effect the frame size of a bike you will want to search.

    I would not suggest searching out a road bike at this point, or for family rides. A more upright position will be comfortable and allow for you to work a little bit harder, and allow him and you to work up to goals and more speed later.

    A mountain type bike should be considered, maybe one without suspension frames. These are referred to as hardtails.

    The advantage is these are fitted from the factory with 26" wheels, with shorter spokes, and sometimes a sturdier thickness will enhance total load capacity. The rims are wider and will often be fitted with 2" or wider tires. It is normal for these rims to be mounted with knobby tires, yet smooth tread patterns are available (slicks).

    Treks, Specialized, Giant and others all made MTB that will hearty enough for the load you need, from the mid 80s to today. And via Craig's List and LBS you may just find a bike in that sub $150 range that will be a good starter. Do not befraid to ask your LBS about the older models, if they show no interest aware of reasons, then find a shop that shares your concern. The good shops today I have found are also interested in fitness, and establishing relationships with the customers.

    Have your husband read some of the threads in the Clyde's forum. There are several that started in his range, others heavier. Their stories are shared, brick walls encountered, spokes broken, miles completed, trips completed, and enjoyment with love ones and new perspective to their value. And even more knowledge about bikes and types he want to search for.

    Your kids are growing, (I will assume), and maybe a big box rider will work for them, as well as for you. Yet I would suggest you consider a better quality ride as I am sure (by your post) you will want to ride with him and may be the driving force to get out and about, so you should enjoy your 2 wheels and be proud of bike as well.

    Where are you located? Knowing this, we could help point out some CL ads observed, or even suggest a LBS that will be assistance.

    Wishing your the best...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •