Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    My Bikes
    Trek 1000c, Giant Rincon
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Appropriate tire size for towing a trailer?

    I have a Trek 1000c with the stock 700cm 28c tires. I just took my 1 year old son out for his first ride in the trailer this weekend. It went well, and he had a blast, so I'm looking forward to riding with him a lot more.

    One thing I noticed though, even though I had the rear tire aired up to the recommended PSI, once I hooked up the trailer and got rolling, I noticed that the tire was squashing under the added load.

    My question is: is 28c too thin? What size should I consider? I'm not even sure what the max size my rims/brakes will support, but i'm afraid that I'll wear the tire out or risk flats if I keep riding with it.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Between Crystal River and Hernando, Florida, 6 miles west of the Withlacoochee Trail
    My Bikes
    I've had several since 1999 but have settled on my beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and my latest, a 2015 Cannondale Supersix EVO 105
    Posts
    13,787
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a friend who pulls his daughter in a trailer. He has 700x23 tires on the bike. I never noticed "squashing under the added load" when I was riding next to him.
    Fatter tires often look squashed with extra weight. They're wider so they spread out more, giving the appearance of being squashed.
    My bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2015 Cannondale Supersix EVO carbon 105

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  3. #3
    Certifiable Bike "Expert"
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    5,631
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dunno, on my Burley (Encore), the tongue load is almost zero. I can't imagine any extra squishing; I usually pulled it with a road bike with 23mm tires.
    I don't even use the offensive term "Fred." -- Sheldon "All Cyclists Are My Friends" Brown (1944-2008)

  4. #4
    GATC
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    south Puget Sound
    Posts
    6,609
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes the trailer shouldn't be any extra load at all. I've been riding a new bike w/ 32s and find I need to pump the tires up a lot more, at least weekly if not more often, than the 2.0 inch tires on my regular commuter.

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    My Bikes
    Trek 1000c, Giant Rincon
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm beginning to think that perhaps I didn't have that tire aired up correctly. I'll try another run and see if I still notice anything strange.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    SE Kansas
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Our trailer adds very little weight to the bike (5 pounds?). I usually run 28's on my bike pulling the trailer and riding on packed stone rail trails. When we moved our son to a burley Piccolo tag along I had to move up (running 35's now).

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bay Area, Calif.
    Posts
    4,881
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wideheavyload View Post
    I'm beginning to think that perhaps I didn't have that tire aired up correctly. I'll try another run and see if I still notice anything strange.
    Also check the "tongue weight" of the trailer when it's loaded with your son and whatever else you take along. I.e. about how much force do you need to exert to lift the end that attaches to the back of your bike? As others have indicated, this is usually only a small fraction of the overall trailer plus cargo weight and therefore not much additional load is placed on the rear wheel. But it might be the case that your trailer has the load farther forward and therefore has a much larger than typical tongue weight.

    For best handling it's usually recommended that the tongue weight be around 5 - 10% of the overall weight and you can usually make some adjustments in where you place the child and other gear if needed. Check with the trailer manufacturer for their recommendation if the tongue weight seems too high.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
    My Bikes
    Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
    Posts
    8,522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    All rear tire will deflect under load. You can't chane the laws of chemistry and gravity.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •