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  1. #1
    Senior Member bboseley's Avatar
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    Quick Release Wheels - Check me Out!

    You may recognize the name. I have posted a couple of questions and have received invaluable assistance. Perhaps one day I can be a “helper”. In my last post I mentioned that I was picking up my new bike today (Saturday) and I have done that. The salesman was very helpful, giving me a full walkthrough. During the ride (bike in car) home, I began to wonder if I truly understand the removal and replacement of the quick release wheels.

    For what it’s worth, the bike is a Trek 1000.

    Please check me out. Following is the way I understand it.

    Front wheel: Release brake. Loosen the quick release adjustment nut. Release the quick release lever. Remove wheel. Replacement: Drop wheel securely into slot. Tighten nut - or secure it might be more correct. Close lever. (Some resistance should be felt). Reengage brake release.

    Rear wheel. Same, but make sure to place chain on smallest sprocket. My terminology is still suspect.

    Sound OK? Anything else I should know or look out for? The real wheel particularly concerns me.

    Thanks again. I’m getting there.

  2. #2
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    Minor corrections...

    Quote Originally Posted by bboseley
    Following is the way I understand it.

    Front wheel: Release brake. Loosen the quick release adjustment nut. Release the quick release lever. Remove wheel.
    If what you're stating is in order then you should release the quick release lever first before loosening the nut. You may not even have to loosen the nut. Many forks do come with "lawyer lips" so oftentimes a little twisting of the nut to get it clear of the little tabs is required.


    Quote Originally Posted by bboseley
    Replacement: Drop wheel securely into slot. Tighten nut - or secure it might be more correct. Close lever. (Some resistance should be felt). Reengage brake release.
    When tightening the nut, my rule of thumb is to also play with the QR lever. You don't want to fully tighten the nut before closing the lever since that may result in too much tension once the QR lever is fully closed. My rule of thumb for the correct "setting" of the nut is that you begin to feel resistance in the lever when it's parallel to the axle. Closing it with your thumb should produce enough resistance that it leaves a slight mark in your skin as it's being closed. I also try and line up the QR so that the lever is pointing to the rear or is parallel to the fork legs on the front and usually point in between the seatstay and chainstay in the rear.


    Quote Originally Posted by bboseley
    Rear wheel. Same, but make sure to place chain on smallest sprocket. My terminology is still suspect.

    Sound OK? Anything else I should know or look out for? The real wheel particularly concerns me.

    Thanks again. I’m getting there.
    For the rear wheel, you have the right idea. It can be a little tricky getting the wheel centered in the dropouts so one trick is to flip the bike over, grab the rear derailleur and swing it back and down. This should give you enough clearance and position things in a way as to allow you drop the wheel in easier. Also, it will center itself which much less effort.
    1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte OCP Club Member
    "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send." -- Jon Postel, RFC1122

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    I align the chain by droping the bike onto the rear wheel, with the cogs just ahead of the rear derailleur. As you press down, the derailleur will pivot into the correct position.
    For riding on trails, point the levers towards the rear.
    In any event, ensure that when closed, the levers are not touching the frame or the fork. If they are, then open and rotate the whole QR/nut a smidgeon within the axle, then close.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tom Pedale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboseley
    You may recognize the name. I have posted a couple of questions and have received invaluable assistance. Perhaps one day I can be a “helper”. In my last post I mentioned that I was picking up my new bike today (Saturday) and I have done that. The salesman was very helpful, giving me a full walkthrough. During the ride (bike in car) home, I began to wonder if I truly understand the removal and replacement of the quick release wheels.

    For what it’s worth, the bike is a Trek 1000.

    Please check me out. Following is the way I understand it.

    Front wheel: Release brake. Loosen the quick release adjustment nut. Release the quick release lever. Remove wheel. Replacement: Drop wheel securely into slot. Tighten nut - or secure it might be more correct. Close lever. (Some resistance should be felt). Reengage brake release.

    Rear wheel. Same, but make sure to place chain on smallest sprocket. My terminology is still suspect.

    Sound OK? Anything else I should know or look out for? The real wheel particularly concerns me.

    Thanks again. I’m getting there.
    It's really important to understand how your quick releases work. Since you just bought your bike, call the shop and ask them when you can come in to get a good visual tutoring on the whole process, especially the rear wheel. When I owned my store, we tried to make sure every bike purchaser had an under-standing of the quick releases. While I can put the whole thing into words, sometimes visual "hands on" instruction is more effective.
    "Learn how to handle hot things. Keep your knives sharp. And above all, have a good time" - Julia Child

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