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-   -   will a smaller bike saddle help me loose on the bum and waist? (http://www.bikeforums.net/recreational-family/878281-will-smaller-bike-saddle-help-me-loose-bum-waist.html)

wamdue_castle 03-16-13 03:49 PM

will a smaller bike saddle help me loose on the bum and waist?
 
so part of my weight loss (about 6.5 stone in 11 months) has been due to bike riding, whilst I continue to slim in and out of tops like no body business, trousers are proving a pain, in that im not loosing as much on the waist, and my bum is larger than it should be.

I currently ride on this type of saddle, and when I first started cycling, I needed it. I do wonder however if im not loosing on the waist (bum) because of it.

Should I got back to my more regular sized saddle? would it help me loose more on the waist/bum?

something more like this

cyclist2000 03-17-13 03:40 PM

I think that just continue to ride, losing weight from your waist and below will start happening. I don't think a saddle change will localize weight loss.

congratulations on the impressive weight loss.

wamdue_castle 03-17-13 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyclist2000 (Post 15397770)
I think that just continue to ride, losing weight from your waist and below will start happening. I don't think a saddle change will localize weight loss.

congratulations on the impressive weight loss.

thanks for the advice.

Hoping to get to 7 stone, in 1 year mark.

VegasTriker 03-17-13 07:09 PM

6.5 stone. That's more than half my approximately 11 stone weight. It's an intriguing measuring system for someone not familiar with it (me). I agree that the pattern of weight loss has nothing to do with the type of saddle you use but my problem with wide saddles was chafing of the thighs on a long ride. The trade-off is less area to support your weight. Not a problem at all for me now that I ride a recumbent.

wamdue_castle 03-18-13 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VegasTriker (Post 15398500)
6.5 stone. That's more than half my approximately 11 stone weight. It's an intriguing measuring system for someone not familiar with it (me). I agree that the pattern of weight loss has nothing to do with the type of saddle you use but my problem with wide saddles was chafing of the thighs on a long ride. The trade-off is less area to support your weight. Not a problem at all for me now that I ride a recumbent.

well I was 22 stone, im thinking of stopping at 11 stone, certainly going to stop, take a good long look at my body, and see if I should or not.

Im quite short for a bloke, so 11 stone, may still be on the high side.

The 22 stone, is why I used the XL saddle, but im thinking its time I switched back down to a more normal size. Looked at recumbents, fear I may see it as a novelty thing, than a serious bike.

Meausing my weight in stone, is the only way I know how to do it, Pounds and Kg, is just as confusing to me, as stone is to you, however I think both are a bit small, as if you track on either, you may end up noting more weight increses than you would looking at stone, as they are small weights. I have been looking at my weight loss every 1/2 stone, and that has worked well for me. Obviously as I get down into the teens, I may look at something slighty differnt.

cyclist2000 03-27-13 06:33 AM

Recumbents are not a passing fad or novelty. I don't own one but from what I understand, recumbents seats are an alternative for riders that cannot find comfortable saddle and tend to be more aerodynamic, the only drawback is the hill climbing.

cplager 03-27-13 07:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyclist2000 (Post 15436658)
Recumbents are not a passing fad or novelty. I don't own one but from what I understand, recumbents seats are an alternative for riders that cannot find comfortable saddle and tend to be more aerodynamic, the only drawback is the hill climbing.

And with the right recumbent, hills aren't really any worse. I have a monster of a bike and climb hills poorly, but actually better on my recumbent than on my DF (diamond frame) because I'm much more practiced on my recumbent.


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