Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Recreational & Family (http://www.bikeforums.net/recreational-family/)
-   -   Riding on the Street with Children (http://www.bikeforums.net/recreational-family/891317-riding-street-children.html)

1987cp 07-16-13 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DX-MAN (Post 15670792)
I taught my daughter the turning technique of heavily weighting the outside pedal to rail a turn ....

What is meant by the phrase, "Rail a turn"?


Quote:

Originally Posted by digibud (Post 15830965)
we rode the sidewalks and stopped at every street crossing and walked until our girls were old enough to hold a line and cautious enough to actually ride safely. At that point it was MORE of a problem. I'm a step-dad. Their father forbid them from riding in the street. We forbid them from riding on the sidewalk once they were old enough to ride in the street safely. They simply had to learn to follow these different rules when at different homes. We did spend a good deal of time talking about the issue. It was quite interesting. Now they are grown with children of their own. They ride in the street and so do their children.

Not the same situation, but my dad is from the rear-brake-is-primary school, and I've adopted the front-brake-is-primary approach and have had my son get comfortable the front hand brake I added to his coaster-brake bike (especially important to me since he was a bit slow to learn to use the coaster brake). This made Grandpa pretty nervous while watching him ride recently!

Give 09-17-13 01:42 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Combine it, put your younger kid in a cargo bikes so she sees what good biking is about and learns from the older child.
I love this Dutch design bike and take my daughters everywhere in this bike, so they learn about rules and how to behave.

chaadster 09-19-13 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1987cp (Post 15856213)
What is meant by the phrase, "Rail a turn"?

It means to carry good speed smoothly through a turn, which as DXMan was saying, requires proper-- advanced, even-- technique. One has to know how to handle the pick, how to pick the best line, and put it all together to make 'railing' happen. It's awesome to see young kids so dialed-in to what's going on that they're hitting turns like that!

delcrossv 09-23-13 10:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chaadster (Post 16082180)
It means to carry good speed smoothly through a turn, which as DXMan was saying, requires proper-- advanced, even-- technique. One has to know how to handle the pick, how to pick the best line, and put it all together to make 'railing' happen. It's awesome to see young kids so dialed-in to what's going on that they're hitting turns like that!

Time at the velodrome really helps develop this.

1987cp 09-23-13 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chaadster (Post 16082180)
One has to know how to handle the pick ....

I mostly understood your response (thanks!), but here I must be misunderstanding again ... this sounds like you mean a rock pick, which seems an unusual item to bring on a bike ride (for me, books and diaper bags are far more usual).

mestizoracer310 10-24-13 03:00 PM

my daughter is 10, and as smart as she is...i don't allow her to ride on the street. ONLY street riding she gets to do is w/in our neighborhood. i live on a somewhat highly used road and she's relegated to sidewalks there as well. i'm not putting the life of my daughter in the hands of these a$$hole$ that i share the road with. i'm just not. you can say we're in more danger on sidewalks but we ride slow...

J.Oxley 10-24-13 10:01 PM

My seven y/o daughter rides middle position when the whole family is out for a ride, and we occasionally have ridden some pretty busy streets. Lots of chatter, lots of instruction. When it's just my daughter and I, the positioning varies.

On the MUP, which crosses more than a few regular streets, I give her the lead which allows her to practice approaching an intersection and/or stop sign as well as proper passing etiquette. She loves the "On your left!" routine.

On regular roads I take the lead and she follows my line unless we're forced to stop at a light. At that point I put her ahead of me, cueing her on where her attention should be at any given moment. On the green, she leads us through the intersection and holds the front until I can safely resume our regular positioning. This allows her to develop a sense of what's going on at intersections while I can clearly see her while making eyeballs at nearby drivers. Most important, I believe, is constant communication, and a thorough post-ride review of any challenging or unusual situations that arose.

We do have the advantage of riding in Portland, which for the most part is a very bike/pedestrian friendly city. We lived in Tucson AZ until early this year, and there is no way I'd have her on anything but residential streets down there. Everybody's little variables are different; working with them is the key.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:30 AM.