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  1. #1
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    Question about Specialized Expedition low entry

    I recently wrote about my interest on a bike that lets me put the feet on the floor while sitting on the saddle. The obvious choice are the Electras. I tried a Townie and was a bit too big for me (I'm 5') and then I was shown an Electra with 24" tires but it felt off, the handling was completely different.

    So after a bit of research I came across with a bike called Specialized Expedition, which is described as having "ground control geometry". What does this mean? Is this the same as the "flat foo technology" from the Electra? Is this Trek Shift the same? (IT looks identical to the Specialized Expedition). Both the Trek and the Specialized have the advantage that they come in 3 size frames. And I personally prefer their look.

    I already have a bike that I like but I have become fearful of falling so, if I change bikes, it will only be to one with this feature. Thank you.

    Diana
    Last edited by ocelotito; 04-29-14 at 05:48 PM.

  2. #2
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    I have to do this from the point of view of an older male who is 5' 4" so I know the challenge of finding a bike that will fit a short person. I looked at the specifications for the Specialized Expedition Sport Low Entry bike and it is the typical frame we used to call a mixte frame in the old days. Who the heck knows what they mean by "ground control technology" and "flat footed technology". Seems like a bunch of buzz words dreamed up by their advertising staff to impress the potential buyer. If the frame fits you properly, you should always be able to reach the ground with your feet firmly planted there. The frame design doesn't look out of the ordinary.

    Is your current bike too large for you? Is your fear caused by not being able to reach the ground easily when you come to a stop? That can be a valid concern for a short person. If that is not the case and you are just fearful of falling off and getting hurt, I'd suggest you consider a trike. You might experience the same fear no matter which regular bike you choose. However, the typical inexpensive one or three-speed "granny trike" is really awful and the cost of a decent recumbent trike (which is a lot more fun to ride) will knock your socks off.

  3. #3
    Senior Member FLJeepGuy's Avatar
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    My wife has the Specialized Expedition Low Entry and loves it. She tried numerous bikes from several of the major manufacturers and kept coming back to this one. My wife had the same issues as you with wanting to have stability at very low speeds and while stopped, and she's very comfortable on this bike.

    The following is from the Specialized "Tech and Design" tab for the bike in question:

    GROUND CONTROL GEOMETRY PLUS LOW-ENTRY MODEL
    WHAT Comfortable frame geometry that allows riders to touch their forefoot to the ground when stopped. Low-entry model available.
    WHY Provides maximum comfort with minimal back and neck strain, and gives the rider more confidence due to easy access to the ground.
    HOW Longer chainstays and a slacker seat tube angle bring the saddle lower to the ground without shortening leg reach, so pedaling remains efficient. Low-entry model features swooping design and is the most accessible in our line, ensuring maximum confidence and stability plus easiest mount/dismount.


    Note the use of the word "forefoot". With the seat adjusted properly, you can get the balls of your feet on the ground while seated on the saddle. Of course, with the low-entry frame, you can also slide forward off the seat without fear of coming down on a bar.

  4. #4
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    Thank you FLJeepGuy for the information. It's not like I am terrified of riding and stop usually with no problems as long as it is not sudden. I'd feel safer if I could put my foot on the ground, even if it's just the ball. There is a bike from Trek that looks very similar (Trek shift). I will check out both.

    Diana

    Quote Originally Posted by FLJeepGuy View Post
    My wife has the Specialized Expedition Low Entry and loves it. She tried numerous bikes from several of the major manufacturers and kept coming back to this one. My wife had the same issues as you with wanting to have stability at very low speeds and while stopped, and she's very comfortable on this bike.

    The following is from the Specialized "Tech and Design" tab for the bike in question:

    GROUND CONTROL GEOMETRY PLUS LOW-ENTRY MODEL
    WHAT Comfortable frame geometry that allows riders to touch their forefoot to the ground when stopped. Low-entry model available.
    WHY Provides maximum comfort with minimal back and neck strain, and gives the rider more confidence due to easy access to the ground.
    HOW Longer chainstays and a slacker seat tube angle bring the saddle lower to the ground without shortening leg reach, so pedaling remains efficient. Low-entry model features swooping design and is the most accessible in our line, ensuring maximum confidence and stability plus easiest mount/dismount.


    Note the use of the word "forefoot". With the seat adjusted properly, you can get the balls of your feet on the ground while seated on the saddle. Of course, with the low-entry frame, you can also slide forward off the seat without fear of coming down on a bar.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Thanks for your reply. Actually, what I've been told is that, in a normal bike (with the typical geometry), there is no way to reach the ground from the saddle AND do the optimal leg extension. I've had several bikes that fit me well and I do have to do the "mounting the saddle" by putting my foot on the pedal first. And I am not terrified of falling while riding, it's just that the mount/dismount from the saddle to stop makes me a bit nervous while riding on traffic or on a street.


    Quote Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
    I have to do this from the point of view of an older male who is 5' 4" so I know the challenge of finding a bike that will fit a short person. I looked at the specifications for the Specialized Expedition Sport Low Entry bike and it is the typical frame we used to call a mixte frame in the old days. Who the heck knows what they mean by "ground control technology" and "flat footed technology". Seems like a bunch of buzz words dreamed up by their advertising staff to impress the potential buyer. If the frame fits you properly, you should always be able to reach the ground with your feet firmly planted there. The frame design doesn't look out of the ordinary.

    Is your current bike too large for you? Is your fear caused by not being able to reach the ground easily when you come to a stop? That can be a valid concern for a short person. If that is not the case and you are just fearful of falling off and getting hurt, I'd suggest you consider a trike. You might experience the same fear no matter which regular bike you choose. However, the typical inexpensive one or three-speed "granny trike" is really awful and the cost of a decent recumbent trike (which is a lot more fun to ride) will knock your socks off.

  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Specialized Bicycle Components
    Shift 2 WSD - Trek Bicycle
    looks like they are aiming at the same Market niche .

    not quite , but almost a crank forward type Trek Pure is more so , a stop flat footed design , approaching a recumbent .

    the seat further back from the pedals for the leg extension , but closer to the ground to put your feet down


    Pure Lowstep - Trek Bicycle

    that may be more what you wish for ..

    The Design wont accept a front derailleur, But a good bike shop can replace the rear wheel with a Sram Dual Drive

    which uses an internal gear 3 speed and the 8 speed cassette. so the triple crank is in the hub.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 04-30-14 at 10:30 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Thanks. I haven't tried the Trek Pure but I tried the Electra and they are very similar. Even at it's lowest seat position, I could hardly reach the ground. They only have it in one size frame. Also, I've been having trouble finding them at the Trek LBS. They wanted me to pay a bit just to bring it to test it, because they didn't have it in the store (and this store is huge). Given that they bought Electra, maybe they are getting rid of that model.

    Tomorrow I'm taking my Myka to a tune up and I'll check out the Expedition. I may even have time to test the Trek Shift too. It will be best to test them on the same day.

    Diana

    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Specialized Bicycle Components
    Shift 2 WSD - Trek Bicycle
    looks like they are aiming at the same Market niche .

    not quite , but almost a crank forward type Trek Pure is more so , a stop flat footed design , approaching a recumbent .

    the seat further back from the pedals for the leg extension , but closer to the ground to put your feet down


    Pure Lowstep - Trek Bicycle

    that may be more what you wish for ..

    The Design wont accept a front derailleur, But a good bike shop can replace the rear wheel with a Sram Dual Drive

    which uses an internal gear 3 speed and the 8 speed cassette. so the triple crank is in the hub.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    UPDATE. I tried the expedition. It comes in three sizes. Even in the smallest one I could not reach the ground, just barely with the tips of my foot. It felt huge. I liked the super low step, that makes getting off the saddle much easier and I liked the upright position. And the seat, oh, the seat. The seat could have been lowered a bit more, maybe an inch, but don't think it would have been enough for me to reach the ground.

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    here is a very low step over bike Sun Bicycles - Product


    but it sounds like you want a flat footed stop, and That is offered by the Pure crank forward type from Trek.

    There are a few others . different brands , just no one sells them where I live. so I have not touched them..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-11-14 at 02:28 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Thanks. I tried an electra townie (very similar to the Pure) and it was too big. I read that these expeditions have a relaxed position so that part of the foot touches the ground from the saddle. I had hopes because they come in three sizes but even the smallest one felt bigger than the townie. I tried a Townie with smaller tires but it didn't handle great, like the other townie. My local Trek refuses to bring a Pure for me to test unless I pay for it.

    About the lowstep, the expedition was OK, I really don't need that part to be lower.

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