Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    Member peterabelard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Lansing MI USA
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    From bent back to wedgie....

    In the thread 'Debate on Road Cycling' Orbit makes the observation that most bent riders don't return to their wedgies.......but that a few of us do and wonders if their are others out there who have made the switch BACK from comfort to the 'upright' way.

    I would be interested if and why others have made the switch. I switched because I couldn't see over cars from the lower position of my bent and like to ride primarily in the city.....where their are lots of cars. I also like that uprights require more work....one of the reasons I ride is to improve my overall fitness -- and my bent was too easy, especially on my upper body.

    Any other heretics around? Why did you backslide to your wedgie?

    Peter
    The Prime Directive: Ride When You Can.

  2. #2
    Senior Member fofa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting, I don't find my 'Bent any easier, it seems to take as much effert to pedal my fat behind around as it did on my old wedgie (may she RIP). But I can ride further because my wrists and back don't hurt as much (ok by behind also), so I get more exercise because the discomfort is not there. But that is why I bought a 'Bent in the first place. I have never been bothered by not "seeing over the cars" myself, so I will stick to a 'Bent. it is just right for me.

  3. #3
    Honorable Member beowoulfe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Clearwater Florida, USA
    Posts
    279
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm on a trike now (Greenspeed GTO-NT) and sit even lower. When I get back
    on my Vision, I feel as high as a big rig driver. If I can't see over a car, I just wait.
    I did put a "Hypno-twister" on my flag pole for when I'm out in the traffic.
    Greenspeed GTO 1027

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    The Woodlands, TX
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a BikeE that I bought after having surgery (my doc ruled out mountain biking... he didn't say anything about 'bents ;-). I commuted on myine for a while, had a lot of fun. Even started MTBing after a while.

    Moved to Texas, MTBed a bit, then got talked into the MS150. Orgiginally was going to ride the BikeE, but I struggled to keep up with the uprights I was riding with, and bought my first road bike (LeMond Buenos Aires). Ride it most of the time now, using the BikeE to ride around town.

    I saw a faster 'bent (a Challenge Hurricane). May decide to try 'bents again, but I probably will ride the LeMond more...

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ill have to admit that i seem to work harder on my upright than i do my swb recumbent ,and under certain conditions the wedgie can feel quite sluggish compared to the recumbent.
    However recumbents are so comfortable that sometimes you dont even worry about speed your just to relaxed and you quite happy to sit back and watch the world go by.
    However this thread is about people that have tryed recumbents
    and changed back to uprights and the reasons why.
    Peter has stated a couple ,ie, being able to see over tops of cars,and,feeling that he gets a better work out ona upright.
    This is very interesting has i read about a fitness club that starts their new clients on a stationary recumbent,has it has less strain on the heart and does not move them to the upright postion until
    fitness has improved.

  6. #6
    Member peterabelard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Lansing MI USA
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Orbit's observation about the fitness club starting members on a stationary recumbent is relevent to this discussion. I fully intend to purchase a stationary recumbent exercise 'bicycle'for the winter....and use it with my Nordic Track ski machine and Pilates performer for 'cold weather' exercise. When the weather gets warm, cycling (and a little yard work....as little as possible) are my exercise......so I want the cycling to work as many parts of my aging body as it can.

    Love the stationary work last winter on the bent.....could read....watch a movie....

    Peter

    (BTW......I got to spend most of yesterday and all of today with my new Airborne Zeppelin.....adjusting.....tweaking....swapping a few components.....it seems to be wonderful. Last year I was doing the same with my RANS Velocity Squared......and I am sorry to say......this year is a LOT more fun. I am glad there are bikes for us all....)
    The Prime Directive: Ride When You Can.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,249
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When Im touring on my standard wedgie touring bike I usually take tracks and trails when I see them. Ive also ported my bike over stretches of bog and moor when the trail runs out, and carried it over fences and styles. I dont ride a special expedition bike just a standard tourer.
    Can you do that kind of riding on a 'bent

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Went out Friday on my upright for 2 hours,and went out today on my recumbent,and it felt like I was definatly working harder on the upright.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I ride as hard as I did on my DF I get as much exercise except for upper body. I take care of that with a handcycle. Karl
    Ride to eat, eat to ride

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At the moment it just feels like im not working as hard ,but I really beleive that for some reason I dont work as hard on my bent as i do my DF.
    How ever this post is about bent rider that convert back to wedgies and there reasons.
    For instance,although this will not stop me from riding my bent,I have nearly been attacked twice on my recumbent,just for riding it.
    For this reason though my wife hates me riding it because it attracts too much attention from the idiots that live where i do,and i have to say theres a lot of them.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Have done the same ride a number of times the ride contains hills and flats etc.I really am working harder on the upright.
    The recumbent is faster for less effort on the flat.On the hills i can stand onthe peddles ,and this pushes up my heart rate on he upright,the recumbent i am forced to spin but am not much slower than the upright .I cover the ride in about the same time ,but find I am much moe breathless on the upright.

  12. #12
    Member peterabelard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Lansing MI USA
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Orbit.....

    Thanks for your detailed description......I found the same sort of things to be true....when I still had my bent. Have sold both of them now and working a LOT harder on my new, very spiffy Airborne Zeppelin....it's light and naturally fast and responsive, but takes a LOT of work, cornering, climbing fast, taking advantage of all its speedy advantages.

    I know...I know.....I can hear my bent friends saying things like 'it's not about going fast'.....or......'I can probably go faster, overall, on my bent'..........but a lot of the pleasure of riding, for me anyway, is that it takes effort and challenges me.

    And....well....can't help being seduced by a sexy Ti bike like my Airborne.......am a sucker for a pretty girl....especially the fast ones.

    Peter
    The Prime Directive: Ride When You Can.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love my recumbent and it is very fast,but as you say i think that if i need a really goodwork out i need to use my upright.
    Do you know that Sam Whitingham that broke the 80mph speed
    record on a recumbent,rides a upright to give him a better work out ,then does some training on a recumbent a few months before the attempt on the record.
    I have to ask the question though,and recumbent riders will hate me for this,but,do you become less fit when riding a recumbent
    full time?

  14. #14
    Senior Member Nobby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Gramde Prairie, Alberta
    My Bikes
    Vision R-44, TerraTrike 3.6
    Posts
    108
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by ORBIT

    I have to ask the question though,and recumbent riders will hate me for this,but,do you become less fit when riding a recumbent
    full time?
    Quite the opposite for me. I ride my bent more than I did my upright and therefore I am more fit for the extra exercise. I get plenty of exercise on it and I don't much care how fast I go. While I got serious about riding for health reasons, I now ride for the pure pleasure. The fitness is a bonus.

    I don't at all dislike uprights, I just find bents to be miles ahead in coolness. Ain't nuttin cooler! And what a joy to ride. Onliest problem is...I don't have enough of em! Just as well, I suppose, otherwise I'd get stressed in trying to decide which to ride.

    Feet first and forward!
    Bill (Nobby) Clark
    Edson, Alberta
    Vision R-44

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I ride as hard as I did on my DF I get as much exercise except for upper body. I take care of that with a handcycle. Karl
    Ride to eat, eat to ride

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thats my trouble,having a upright and a bent,i have to have a excuse to ride both.
    But this thread is about people that convert back to uprights.
    Has any one else got any other reason why they went back to a upright?
    Ill have to say if i rode my recumbent full time I would find it very hard to go back to a upright,the upright works you so hard.

  17. #17
    Senior Member ChiliDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Clermont County, Ohio
    My Bikes
    RANS Cruz, Fuji Saratoga 1.0
    Posts
    734
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a bent and a road bike at the same time. The road bike was super light, fast, and just a joy to ride. Eventually, I sold my bent more or less because I needed the money. I continued to ride my road bike and considered myself a "roadie", but the pain in the butt, hands, arms were just getting worse and worse. I went out for a FAST, "fun" ride and would go 30 miles and then not be able to walk for a week. It just became a burden. I tried all the saddles, gloves, handlebar tape, suggestions-you name it. Finally I said "to heck with it". I sold the roadbike and went out the same day and bought my Rans Rocket.

    It is FAST, fun, comfortable, and most of all, no pain. I will ride it further, faster, and more often than the road bike 'cause it is FUN and PAINLESS. I work as hard or harder on it 'cause I WANT to go fast and far on it. Don't have to keep stopping because of numb butt, hands, and shoulders/neck.

    I have a wedgie "comfort bike" that I keep on hand for guests or for hauling places where the bent might not be such a good idea. It has fat 26"x2" tires and suspension seatpost. It's the most I can tolerate and then I am longing for the comfort, speed, and peppiness of my Rocket. No turning back for me....
    Last edited by ChiliDog; 08-03-02 at 10:18 PM.
    The bike for you is the one you will ride!

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As I said this sounds like the normal events when a person
    rides a recumbent they find it very hard to change back to a upright.
    Interesting point about having a upright bike for general duties,
    you have probably hit on one of the big reasons that people do change back to a upright,to do short trips around town in traffic.,
    when comfort is not going to be a big problem.
    With this in mind i findit very strange that most audax riders dont
    ride recumbents.

  19. #19
    Senior Member ChiliDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Clermont County, Ohio
    My Bikes
    RANS Cruz, Fuji Saratoga 1.0
    Posts
    734
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Orbit-I am very sorry to read that you cannot ride your bent without fear of being attacked! What is it, do you think? Do you just live in a very bad part of town or are people so depraved that they are jealous of someone who is enjoying life or trying to get fit? What?

    We have some of this behavior over here-largely obnoxious teenagers or ignorant "red necks" (as they are termed). I chalk it up to envy or anger at themselves. Used to get this behavior while running sometimes too. I've only been screamed at from moving vehicles or had pop cans thrown at me. And thankfully only a few times.

    Be careful and stay safe!
    The bike for you is the one you will ride!

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it is something to do where I live.From what I hear most big cities are like this.The attitude around where I live is bad,so much so it has effected the wife when i ride my recumbent.
    Last time I rode it when I came home there were people shoutng
    aggressive comments from down the road,the wife opened the door and dragged me in quick.What was that all about?i asked.
    I dont want people to know that the person that rides that bike lives hear,they might think your a bit strange,and start causing
    trouble around the house.I will continue to ride my recumbent
    but i do pick my times when to ride it,chucking out time at the pub is a definate no no.

  21. #21
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    616
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm one of the few the left a 'bent behind to ride an upright.

    I had a BikeE, and then a Rans Rocket. I sold them both. They were fine bikes, and fun in their way, but I never did like them as much as my road bikes. Here's a brief list of the reasons:

    (1) I preferred the view from the higher position of an upright.

    (2) My uprights were much more maneuverable, and hopping over tracks, curbs, etc., is a fun and welcome convenience.

    (3) Accelerating and climbing are actually fun when you can stand and hammer.

    (4) The recumbents don't permit climbing as efficiently as the uprights. I know, a fit rider can climb reasonably well on a recumbent. But the position simply doesn't facilitate climbing as well as the upright, even when one stays seated. Yes, this is a controversial view. That's the way I sees it, though, and I'm convinced.

    (5) It's easier to carry and store an upright bike.

    (6) I could get my heart rate higher on my upright road bike, and get a better workout. I'm not sure exactly what made the difference, but that's the way it was.

    (7) Did I mention climbing? I was living in a very hilly area.

    (8) I liked pack riding that the enhanced control of the upright made possible.

    (9) I just liked the look better.

    (10) Carrying things, adding racks and heavy bags, is much easier on upright bikes.

    (11) My upright road bike was significantly faster than any recumbent near its price.

    (12) Being able to change positions on the uprights is a welcome, and for me essential, feature on long rides.

    (13) Rough offroad riding on my uprights, even my touring bike. Try that on a recumbent.

    (14) I could use the pockets on my back on the upright.

    The recumbents were a nice change of pace. They were fun. They were comfortable on short rides. But I liked my touring bike better for around-town riding, and I liked my road bike better for getting out and cruising along the roads.

    A couple guys we rode with had recumbents, one had a Rans something or other, a lower, performance model. On hilly terrain with some stops at major roads road bikes would outperform his rig. He just couldn't climb nearly as hard as we could on uprights, and he didn't really fly up to catch us easily on the flats afterward. This is just an observation of one guy, but he was pretty fit. It made an impression on me.

    I'm happy to ride with 'bent riders. I just prefer a classical ride.

    Cheers.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can climb very well on my recumbent,its a case of spinning fast
    instead.But I do find i get a harder work out on my upright,in fact
    i tried my recumbent up a steep hill and my upright up the same hill.I was not much faster on the upright,and yet my lungs where
    bursting and heart racing compared to what it was on the recumbent.Ive tryed a ride on the recumbent and the same ride
    on the upright,the times where much the same,but i can feel i have to work harder on the upright.
    I really do believe that you work the body much harder on a upright for the same overall average speed.
    I also find however that it is easier to spin the pedals on a recumbent than it is on a upright,on the recumbent i find it very easy to spin the pedals fast,but for some reason on a upright my candace slows down,infact it is quite uncomfortable to try and spin as fast as i can on the recumbent.
    Its strange after riding my recumbent,and then riding my upright
    the upright feels like riding through glue,my legs feels strong,dont
    get me wrong,but i can actually feel a greater resistance to forward motion.

  23. #23
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    616
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Orbit writes:

    But I do find i get a harder work out on my upright,in fact
    i tried my recumbent up a steep hill and my upright up the same hill.I was not much faster on the upright,and yet my lungs where
    bursting and heart racing compared to what it was on the recumbent.Ive tryed a ride on the recumbent and the same ride
    on the upright,the times where much the same,but i can feel i have to work harder on the upright.
    I really do believe that you work the body much harder on a upright for the same overall average speed.

    I also find however that it is easier to spin the pedals on a recumbent than it is on a upright,on the recumbent i find it very easy to spin the pedals fast,but for some reason on a upright my candace slows down,infact it is quite uncomfortable to try and spin as fast as i can on the recumbent.


    I always found it much easier to climb with the upright. On shorter climbs, I could just hammer to the top without slowing down. I couldn't do that on either recumbent. On longer climbs, the bikes were closer-- but I could still get up the hill faster on an upright even if I stayed seated the whole while. Like you, though, I had a higher heartrate on the upright.

    It's interesting you say that the pedals are easier to spin on the recumbent. I found that too-- but I also found that the pedals are easier to push on an upright. I could always manage higher gears without as much strain on the upright bike.

    My hypothesis about all this is that an upright road bike position allows one to generate greater force on the pedals, and therefore greater power, than one can do on a recumbent. This is made possible, I thought, because one's upper body is involved adding weight to the legs, and the muscles of the upper body help move the upper body into position. While you can push against a seat back on the recumbent, you can't push as hard without straining your knees. I couldn't, anyway. So, the upright allows muscles other than the leg muscles to do work, and to do it without putting excess strain on the knees.

    I'm not sure about this explanation. At least, though, I was pretty confident I could generate more power on an upright because I could always climb faster on the upright. The difference, I thought, wasn't just the weight of the bikes.

    When recumbents have a speed advantage on the flat, my guess they have it because of improved aerodynamics. That's a significant advantage, and one that would compensate for a less productive riding position.

    The above is just speculation on my part. I don't have any serious evidence for my explanation of the difference between the bikes. I do, though, have the observation that I could climb faster, and use higher gears, on the upright than the recumbent. I also could feel my upper body during and after the ride more than on a recumbent. This may be less comfortable sometimes, but it's conducive to more power. Or so I think.

    At any rate, I'd like to ride high end recumbent someday.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bimingham England
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Believe it or not i may have found a health reason to ride a upright.It wont effect most people but it may effect me.
    I have a condition known as glaucoma.Iv made a number of enquires to which position may be better for me to ride in with this condition.The result is that im getting some specialists in glaucoma telling me that it would be best for me to ride a upright bike.Its complicated but the recumbent position may be increasing
    my iops which can cause damage to my optic nerve.Untill i get more info im going to be riding my upright.This wont effect most people,but any one with glaucoma its worth thinking about.

  25. #25
    Slow and unsteady
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    St Louis, MO
    My Bikes
    Bacchetta Agio, Bacchetta Giro 20, Trek 520
    Posts
    473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used a variety of upright bikes (road, hybrid, MTB) for several years. I had problems with numbness, pain and weakness in all the contact areas.

    I got a BikeE. Aside from stiffness and discomfort in the lower back, most of the problems went away.

    But I hated riding it. It was slow to acclerate. And even slower uphill. Handled like an 18 wheeler. And hauling it anywhere to start a ride was very difficult.

    So I got rid of it and got back into uprights. I studied my position more, lowered my saddle and found a fore/aft setting that reduced pressure on the sensitive areas. I raised my handlebars.

    And it doesn't hurt anymore, aside from occassional numbness in my hands.

    The Bike E would have been nice, but it was too slow and clumsy and immensely impractical (for me - I don't deny that others prefer and enjoy recumbents.)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •