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  1. #26
    'Bent Brian
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    Now let's see.... Would that make you famous or infamous... Probably both! He, He.

    'bent Brian

  2. #27
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    I also broke my left leg on my new Linear recumbent. The left leg went under the recumbent at about five miles per hour while i was doing a u turn. The bike started to go over because my speed was down to 5 mph. . When i extended the left foot , and during the u turn, ,to hold the bike from falling, it twisted under the frame and i heard the fibula snap.

    Then i was laying in the road, and it happened so quick at a very low speed. Years for riding since 1948, and falling off motorcycles and bicycles and never a broken bone. It appears that a complete stop on a recumbent before putting a leg down would have prevented a broken leg.

    When the cast comes off i guess it will be back to my road bike, or beach bike. They do not suck your leg under the frame during a turn!
    Last edited by John Ben; 08-28-04 at 07:09 PM. Reason: spelling of fibula

  3. #28
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    My wife and I ride trikes--WW. One of the real pleasures is the freedom from the concerns that are specific to two-wheelers. Balance, ruts, debris, sand, water, ice, sudden flats, and so on are all non-issues. You don't even unclip when you stop--unless you feel like it. You can literally follow people at a walking, make that strolling, pace while sipping your lemonade if you want. Pretty much the only way to end up on the pavement is to turn it over sideways and that will be the result of careless highspeed cornering.

    Try one--you'll like it!

    CS

  4. #29
    Newbie Izzy's Avatar
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    I've been the victim of hatred for an alternative approach to surfing waves. I use surf specific kayaks and let me tell you, I've got some real good stories. However, that hasn't stopped me from doing it and I'm quite good at it. I've been riding a hybrid bike and I'm in the market for a used recumbent. If you're no longer comfortable with yours and want to part with it, send me an email. igodoy@sjm.com.

  5. #30
    Senior Member
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    As far as I am concerned I left my my upright bike, a suspended mountainbike for reasons of health. My health has improved and my physical condition as well as a result of my daily training on a recumbent. I used to have a bad back, but now I feel strong as a horse. So if you want to gain health get yourself a recumbent and stop torturing yourself with an upright bike.

  6. #31
    Senior Member
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    Hello Orbit,
    I recognize the reactions of people in your description. All those endless stupid questions and so forth. When I started riding a recumbent two years ago, the frequency of silly questions hostile reactions was very high. I was hit by a plastic bag filled with water and urine and I met laughing idiots everywhere. Now two years later I can see a clear change in attitude: Nowadays the most frequent question is where to buy. People greet me instead of laughing at me. I think this change in attitude is due to increasing knowledge.

  7. #32
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    The main health problem that I have encountered thus far is addiction to recumbent riding...oh well, could be worse I guess!

  8. #33
    Riding a '04 Rans V-Rex Ken_in_Michigan's Avatar
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    The health risks riding a bent are certainly less than on a DF. If you have an accident on a DF you are likely to take a header over the handle bars. That can result in a concussion, double vision [which my wife had after being hit by a car on a DF) or worse yet, a broken neck and possible paralysis. In addition you usually have carpal tunnel problems, back problems, and circulation problems in the pubic regions from extended use of the DF bikes. The real laugh is that DFs are also called "safety bikes" since they were a safer bike than the "penny-farthing" high wheelers that they replaced. If the only major health problem or injury that has been reported with bents is "leg suck" and the resulting broken bones.

    I have had only one accident with a bent since I went bent 3 years ago. I was riding a BikeE AT and while riding at around 8-9 mph my front tire caught between a manhole cover and the sidewalk. The bike imediately stopped and I slid forward onto the frame between the seat and the tiller bar. Other than a broken spoke that showed up later neither I nor my bike were injured.

    Even with the risk of "leg suck" the true safety bikes are bents!
    Ken the Troll
    [One who lives below the Mighty Mac Bridge]
    Riding an 04 V-Rex
    In Western Michigan

  9. #34
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    GO BENT!!!! My leg is healing and I ready to ride again on the recumbent in a few weeks, but I will be more careful!

  10. #35
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    I am also buying a recumbent tryke for the wife's birthday!! Like I bought the Linear recumbent for her birthday, that she never rode!! Can't have too many bikes!

  11. #36
    'Bent Brian
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    That's the spirit! Those tadpole trikes really rock. There is a guy in our riding club that has a Catrike Road. It weighs in less than my Tailwind and he flys on that thing. Awesome Machine. Has it equipped with a quad chainring. Now finish healing so you can ride!

    'bent Brian

  12. #37
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    i suppose that if you were on a trike that would nothave happened eh?

    odie(***

  13. #38
    Senior Member
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    Safety and Health on a Recumbent.

    It took me some time to really get familiar with the different balancing technique on a recumbent. I should say that when my son (14) took over my Rans Stratus, he adjusted much more quickly. I had more frequent and more damaging accidents on an DF than a recumbent, bike and trike.

    Healthwise, the only additional health problem (if you can call it so) on a recumbent is that I can ride more often and farther. Things like the normal arthritis in my 59 yr old knees are more likely to make themselves felt. All the the pressure point issues (wrists, shoulders, crotch) are much better on a recumbent. I developed some carpal tunnel issues before started to ride recumbents and my hands would go dead in 5 miles on my Rockhopper.

    Now, I ride a Greenspeed trike. It gives me the low-speed-balance and stay-clipped-in advantages that make it a pleasure to ride into the mountains or around town. I just have to be careful about coming out from behind parked cars.

    Regards,

    Gary

  14. #39
    Doomsled funbun's Avatar
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    Clipless pedals are needed. Downhill at 45 mph and you foot slips off the pedals... Well, I hope you're not planning on having kids.
    Check it out:

    Blog The Travelogue

  15. #40
    Cruzer johntolhurst's Avatar
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    Does the chance of leg suck decrease with a hard shell seat instead of a mesh seat? I was thinking, maybe if the leg can slide around to the side, its less likely to break. Any thoughts on that?
    John

  16. #41
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    Clip into the pedals and you will have no leg suck.
    My only problem has been recumbutt. I am over it.
    Lightning Phantom

  17. #42
    Doomsled funbun's Avatar
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    The biggest health problem with recumbents is not having one!
    Check it out:

    Blog The Travelogue

  18. #43
    Dominatrikes sbhikes's Avatar
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    I think if I had an accident it would really hurt and I could get really messed up. But somehow I don't think the chances of massive head injuries are quite as great as on a DF.

    As for leg suck, I've ridden my bike to work since December. It has platform pedals and I wear regular shoes and I have no trouble keeping my feet on the pedals. Even had some squirrelly moments in patches of sand, but the feet stayed put.

    The only long-term health problems I can see is that I guess I use my stomach muscles a little while riding my recumbent. I had abdominal surgery back in October. I still get all swollen in my stomach when I ride.

    Other long term health problem: Riding a recumbent is so easy you might not lose very much weight, if any, if that's your goal. Unless you're really fat already, you might find that it's not enough exercise to reduce or even maintain your weight.
    ~Diane
    Recumbents: Lightning Thunderbolt, '06 Catrike Pocket. Upright: Trek Mountain Bike.
    8.5 mile commute. I like bike lanes.

  19. #44
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    I've fallen over twice when I couldn't unclip on time on my Action Bent RR. My seat hight is 22 inches. I looked stupid trying to unclip with the bike on top of me, but no ouch. I know two DF riders who also fell recently due to being clipped in while stopped. One cracked a bone in his elbow, the other broke her wrist.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by everitreed
    Hi,
    I am consideing getting a recumbent. Since I am young, 22, I am worried about any long term health problems associated. Does anyone know of any?
    Everit
    The short answer: I do not know of any long term untreatable health problems, having only the internet search and two + years experience upon which to rely. All info is anecdotal. Common problems I have found in both knowledge bases: leg suck, recumbutt, and crotch rash from clothing and perspiration, problems with knee joints, foot pain or "hot foot", and tendon problems. All treatable/preventable to a level of tolerance for most riders including me. These seem to be treatable with proper fit of equipment including frame size, seat position, etc., and shoes, cranks and pedals. Untreated, the problems could become essentially chronic, eg injured tendons in the legs or feet. DF riders have a similar set of problems and solutions (in addition to others).


    Following is a little off the thread topic, but may provide additional food for thought from the perspective of a new recumbent rider.

    Well, I have been away from this forum for several months. Much of that time, I have been riding my homebuilt Marko Lounger (a modified version of a Tour Easy clone). I had never sat my butt on a two wheeled recumbent prior to this. Built it Nov/Dec 2004. I went directly from many years on a road bike to a tadpole trike approx. two years ago. Recumbents of any kind are rare in my area. I had considered recumbent bikes over the years, but heard mostly disparaging remarks and was convinced that they were an esoteric product that was supported by a cult following. With the aid of the internet, I have become more knowledgeable. It is of benefit that the "recumbent community" is enthusiastic without being bombastic. I read informed opinion and facts and learned that there were several kinds of recumbent bikes and that the lwb probably was the easiest and safest for new recumbent riders.

    So, being the DIY kind, (and cheap too), I searched for ideas and info and built my bike just to verify who was correct about the desireability, dangers and benefits. The most enlightening piece of advice came (IIRC) from the Tour Easy www site or was it from the site that has the plans for the clone? It explained the required technique for learning to ride the recumbent for the first time. This advice made all the difference for my first effort. Basically it stated the technique of starting on level surface, in a straight line, with one pedal high, giving a strong push on that pedal, and concentrating one's focus in the far distance as opposed to the near distance area near the bike. I wobbled a bit in the first ten yards distance, but was off on a good start. Problem is this grin. It collects bugs when at speed (possible allergic reaction health hazzard).

    So far, I have layed it down once when I hit a patch of mud near a gutter and over corrected to get out of it; leg suck, minor road rash, no serious injury, lesson learned. Recently, made a fast turn at a T junction with a RR crossing at the turn. Should have slowed. Front tire hit the tracks in mid turn and slid, then found traction and repeated the sequence until finally gaining the tarmac. The sudden traction stood me up from the lean and I wobbled to a stop. The front tire was flat from the impact with the RR ties spike heads. No wonder I had difficulty to control the bike. All's well........

    This is a long winded way of saying that there is a learning curve when changing from a DF to a recumbent bike. I tend to steer and correct from difficulties as though I was riding a DF bike. Do not do that. Seek to know the technique, do not assume that you know how to ride a bike. I hope you find, as I have, that the reward is worth the effort.

    Jim

  21. #46
    Senior Member John C. Ratliff's Avatar
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    I have been riding a Rans Stratus for about a year and a half. I currently have 1957 miles on it (plus some not recorded). My impressions are that recumbants, especially long wheelbase (LWB) recumbants, are the safest bicycle on the road. It is stable, has a very ergonomic body and hand position, and provides for very good amounts of exercise. My weight is down from about 220 to about 192 right now (headed further down, I hope). My blood pressure is sitting at 102/68 at my last doctor's visit, and I'm 59 years old.

    I have had three spills on my Stratus, and each was at low speed. One was crossing a crosswalk on the light, and hitting the curb slightly off the handicapped ramp; result--a bruised side and ego. The second time was on a bike pathway on a boardwalk, when wet. It was slippery, and I was trying to make a turn; result, dirty pants and bruised ego (I now walk it when wet, and the above seat steering (ASS) give the bike very good handling when being walked). the third time was going around a paved path too fast, and being dumped on the asphalt (~8 mph); result--bruised hip/buttocks and ego. So falling has not been a problem for me.

    Right now I have a slight strain of my left, lower, out calf muscle. I went to short pants too soon, while the weather was still cool. I expect that to be gone in another day or so.

    Concerning the leg suck, I've heard this from several Linear recumbant riders, and have commented elsewhere here that this may be more specific to the bicycle design (for Linear and maybe a few others) than other designs. But it only occurs when you put your foot down while still moving forward (something that is difficult to impossible to do when on a diamond frame). I've not had this problem on the Rans Stratus, and at one time when John Ben discussed his problem, I tried to get into that position on my Rans Stratus. I found that my frame did not trap my leg well, and it could pass under the seat (but I have pretty flexible knee and ankle joints too, from swimming and diving).

    I have prevented several accidents by being able to see the driver at eye height, and determine that the driver had not seen me when turning in front of me.

    So overall, I feel that the LWB recumbant is a much, much safer bicycle than the various various diamond frame bicycles. I switched after three accidents that I feel could have been prevented by riding a recumbant. Two were car accidents where I could not monitor the traffic well enough to prevent the accident, and one was a stuck wheel where I went over the handlebars on my Trek 1440 road bike at slow speed. So I would encourage anyone thinking about a recumbant to try them out.

    John
    John Ratliff

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