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Recumbent What IS that thing?! Recumbents may be odd looking, but they have many advantages over a "wedgie" bicycle. Discuss the in's and out's recumbent lifestyle in the recumbent forum.

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Old 03-17-07, 07:34 AM   #1
dty
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what r the pros/cons of recumbent bikes

it says there r some pros on the forum link.

how hard r they to ride up hills?
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Old 03-17-07, 08:37 AM   #2
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I originally got into recumbents for the comfort factor. Lying in a recliner is incomparably more comfortable than perching on a saddle and resting a considerable % of your body weight on your hands, which are placed on a 7/8" metal tube. It was only a few years later that I discovered how fast recumbents could be. Whereas I used to ride my upright with the 'B' group in my club, now I ride with the 'A' group - and drop them like stones when I get bored with their pace.

Rather than saying that bents are at a disadvantage climbing, I prefer to think of it as uprights being disadvantaged everywhere else: flat ground, downhills, tailwinds, headwinds - heck they're even disadvantaged on a lot of hills. At the end of the day, no matter how hilly the route, my overall average speed is much higher on my bents than it ever was on my uprights.
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Old 03-17-07, 09:00 AM   #3
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what about if you have to stop suddenly and put your feet down, how hard is that to do?

what about on the bumps?

Last edited by dty; 03-17-07 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 03-17-07, 09:36 AM   #4
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Many bents are lower to the ground and it's so easy just to drop your feet. The thing with a bent is that I've had to stop suddenly less often on a bent cause I'm looking forward not down so I can see things coming up.
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Old 03-17-07, 12:50 PM   #5
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Recumbents are not "hard" to climb hill, they are different then regular bicycles, require less options in muscles to use to get yourself up the hills.. no option to get "off the saddle" or "use your whole body" to climb. It may seems that you are spending more time climbing than a regular bicycle, that's why most people think recumbent are "harder" to climb.
Just like anything else, once you're used to it and get your recumbent legs and lungs built up, it makes little difference.
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Old 03-17-07, 01:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dty
what about if you have to stop suddenly and put your feet down, how hard is that to do?

what about on the bumps?
It's easier than a DF really. You have to dismount a DF and try to get one foot down at the same time. You just put your feet down on a recumbent. Even on a highracer you just sit up and put both feet down. Plan on 500 to 2,000 miles to get used to the differences. You have to learn to relax and trust the bike. I'm surprised at how maneuverable I've become.

Bumps? Just go over them like any other bicycle. You can't bunny hop of course, so what? Bents are more maneuverable that you may think.

Bents are different. That's all. If you had started on a recumbent when you were eight years old, you'd be asking the same question about the DF.
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Old 03-17-07, 04:57 PM   #7
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I ride a trike and ther eis nothing easier riding uphill than a trike. I put it in super-granny and spin. Follow a nice straight line and never fall over
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Old 03-17-07, 05:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dty
what about if you have to stop suddenly and put your feet down, how hard is that to do?
I never put my feet down while riding (leg suck hurts on a tadpole trike, but that is another subject for another thread). Darn tourists today walked right in front of me- so I locked all 3 wheels with disc brakes. No problem. Annoying, but I just faked a smile. I hate having to shift back down after a stop from high!

And when I got to the kayak event; just pulled up, gripped the rear brake firmly - pushed the emergency brake pin in, had my own front row chaise lounge, stereo, umbrella.

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Old 03-18-07, 06:36 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by funbun
Bents are different. That's all. If you had started on a recumbent when you were eight years old, you'd be asking the same question about the DF.
Well put.
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Old 03-18-07, 08:25 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaman
I ride a trike and ther eis nothing easier riding uphill than a trike. I put it in super-granny and spin. Follow a nice straight line and never fall over
I can definitely see the allure of trikes - they sound like a lot of fun and hopefully I'll get my first trike test ride soon now that I know someone with a Catrike. However, I gotta say I am not sure they are easier to ride uphill than a 2 wheel bent and on my SWB dual 26 bent I have never come close to falling over. Going to fast uphill I guess....
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Old 03-18-07, 01:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by vik
I can definitely see the allure of trikes - they sound like a lot of fun and hopefully I'll get my first trike test ride soon now that I know someone with a Catrike. However, I gotta say I am not sure they are easier to ride uphill than a 2 wheel bent and on my SWB dual 26 bent I have never come close to falling over. Going to fast uphill I guess....
You must not have a problem with leg cramps... I was at the end of a ride yesterday and several muscles were at the verge of locking up. The last stretch included a pretty steep climb... not long, but long enough that had I not had 14 gear-inches available, I would have pulled something. No, you can't ride a two wheeler that slow without falling over. The effort was no more than level ground (just took a lot longer). It's the climbs that set off my cramps. Need lots more training
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Old 03-18-07, 03:17 PM   #12
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For the LWB's, it's waaaay more comfort in exchange for some of the speed. You sit up straight, with some lumbar support, the neck and shoulders are straight and relaxed. The wrists don't carry any weight. Less speed because of fatter tires and heavier bike. On the uphills, you won't be passing your df friends when you ride a LWB.
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Old 03-18-07, 03:30 PM   #13
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Not to play devils advocate here but may I ask why are you asking dtv? Are you looking at getting a recumbent? Did you get into a debate with a recumbent rider & you ride a diamond frame bike? Are you doing research for a article or school assignment?

We don't mind answering your questions but perhaps if you give us some clarification as to why you are asking it may make it easire for us to answer you & guide you in the right direction.
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Old 03-18-07, 07:47 PM   #14
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reason: just curious.

i would probably never buy 1 because they cost more and less available 2nd hand i imagine.
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Old 03-18-07, 07:52 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dty
reason: just curious.

i would probably never buy 1 because they cost more and less available 2nd hand i imagine.
I don't know what you mean by less available. But they do not cost anymore then a good road bike. I spent $1,100 on mine when I bought it. I could have easily spent that much or more on a good road bike. they cost about the same as a road bike in comparison. So your thinking of they cost more is a myth.

Are there anymore myths about recumbents you'd like to have cleared up?
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Old 03-18-07, 08:46 PM   #16
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It's true at the low end they'll cost more. You won't find a 20 year old, $100 recumbent on ebay. The comparison is much more equal if you're comparing new $1500 or $2000 bents vs uprights of equal value.
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Old 03-18-07, 09:22 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkaapcke
Less speed because of fatter tires and heavier bike. On the uphills, you won't be passing your df friends when you ride a LWB.
I have a TE and I pass people all the time on up hills on df's. As far as speed they are following me on club rides, and I dont mean drafting either. They always tell me I give them a good work out.
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Old 03-18-07, 09:29 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dty
reason: just curious.

i would probably never buy 1 because they cost more and less available 2nd hand i imagine.
Don't say that until you ride one. Take a day off work and go to a recumbent shop and test ride everything they've got. Ride it around town even, then you'll have a better idea if you want to buy one.

Trust me you'll find ways to get one. I had Bentech build me a frame, and I just transfered components from my Trek 800 MTB.

Don't let cost stop you. Compare a $1,500 DF touring bike to a $1,500 Stratus or something.

Plus, check out Bentrider's For sale section. There is a Rans Strauts for sale for $750: http://www.bentrideronline.com/messa...splay.php?f=10

Last edited by funbun; 03-18-07 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 03-18-07, 09:43 PM   #19
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I'm sending my payment tomorrow for my "FIRST" bent, my excitement level is way off the chart. I have been sold on them for about a year now and it is finally coming to be.
Steven
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Old 03-19-07, 08:19 AM   #20
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I'm sending my payment tomorrow for my "FIRST" bent, my excitement level is way off the chart. I have been sold on them for about a year now and it is finally coming to be.
Steven
That's how is was for me. I sold on them a long time before I got one. Waiting just made the moment I got one all the better.
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Old 03-19-07, 09:15 AM   #21
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I've written all about it: http://www.rebel-cycles.com/newride.html
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Old 03-19-07, 11:33 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by BlazingPedals
It's true at the low end they'll cost more. You won't find a 20 year old, $100 recumbent on ebay. The comparison is much more equal if you're comparing new $1500 or $2000 bents vs uprights of equal value.
true. i dont think ill be able to walk into a pawn shop and buy 1 for $20.
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Old 03-19-07, 11:38 AM   #23
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Wikipedia has a good summary of the pros/cons. Scroll down, the article is a little long:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recumbent_bicycle
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Old 03-19-07, 03:43 PM   #24
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One CON I can think of that can be looked at as a PRO is the amount of time recumbent riding can consume. The more a regular bike hurt, the less riding I did as I got older. The recumbents are so much more comfortable and fun to ride that it is a very time consuming hobby.

If you are looking for a sub $100 used recumbent then you really are dreaming. I regularly ride with several other recumbent riders. Among us we have 12 recumbents, 11 bought used. Our four trikes were all well over $1K but most of the two wheelers were well below $1,000 and several were in the $400 to $500 range. None are entry level bikes or worn out junkers. I did come across one fellow who told me he had found his Tour Easy recumbent in a second hand store for $100 but I bet the likelyhood of that is about as good as getting struck by lightning.
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Old 03-19-07, 04:02 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dty
reason: just curious.
i would probably never buy 1 because they cost more and less available 2nd hand i imagine.
Pro #1: They are much more comfortable than upright bikes are. People who have only had uprights and insist that "they're perfectly comfortable" don't know what they're talking about. You could probably comfortably ride a recumbent at least 2 or 3 times farther than you could on an upright bike, and padded shorts and gloves aren't required--many high-mileage recumbent riders don't even own any padded shorts at all. There's no hand pressure or neck strain, and little or no seat pain at all (most recumbent models are only available with one seat, unlike upright bikes, where the shop has a wall-of-seats for you to choose from in the hopes that you'll buy a bike).
Pro #2: They can be faster than an upright bike, for the same pedaling effort. Most of the faster recumbents are not the cheaper ones however (but not the most expensive ones either).
--------
Con #1: they generally do weigh more, and don't have the "lively" feel an upright bike does.
Con #2: they can be more hassle to transport; many recumbents won't fit on standard car-mount bike carriers.
Con #3: (semi-related to #2) if you use your bike with public transportation, then be aware that recumbents may not fit on public-transportation bike racks either (this is a limiting factor for many people who bike/train or bike/bus to work).
~
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