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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    SWB -vs- LWB; USS -vs- OSS

    What are the advantages / disadvantages of SWB -vs- LWB? And for SWBs: the advantages / disadvantages of USS -vs- OSS?

    A friend with an older Vision SWB converted it from USS to OSS. I have only ridden an SWB with USS. It felt very confortable and natural.

    For USS: the slack span of the chain has to go over the bars & cables. Does this create problems?

  2. #2
    Ride more, eat less cat0020's Avatar
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    Just what I could think of:

    SWB pro: Weight less, more compact, easier to transport, take up less room in the garage/house, more nimble in city traffic.

    SWB con: Less stable, quick/sensitive steering, danger of the front wheel rub against feet during tight turns.

    USS pro: Less likely to have arm fatigue for long distance riding, weight less than OSS (less cable/housing length).

    USS con: wider profile, less capable in tight traffic situation.
    Master your environment, and you will survive just fine.
    Chances favor the prepared mind.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Thanks -

    Also, I notice that I feel more vulnerable (wider) along the shoulder of the road with the USS than I do on a DF bike. Is this something you get used to?

  4. #4
    Ride more, eat less cat0020's Avatar
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    That's rather personal.. I much rather be narrower on a OSS and able to sneak between tightly parked cars at a traffic light. If I hit anything on my recumbent, it will be hit by my chainrings, preferably... not with my knuckles.
    Master your environment, and you will survive just fine.
    Chances favor the prepared mind.

  5. #5
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    SWB pro: the front wheel is protected by the boom so that you cannot touch it to someone's rear wheel in a crowded situation. Hitting your front wheel can put you down on the pavement right now; in fact it's probably the most common reason for pacelines going down. I've touched my foot to someone's rear wheel twice this year, with no bad results (both their fault.)

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