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  1. #1
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Any opinions on the Day6 Dream?

    http://day6bicycles.com/

    Just curious as to whether this was a legit 'bent...

  2. #2
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    Technically, the seat is mounted to a seatpost, and the seat back is pretty much unnecessary; so it's not a recumbent, it's a crank forward. 7-speed rear marks it as most likely low quality stuff. Beyond that, there's not much info. It'd make a good competitor to the Electra Townie, if the price was right - but we don't know the price! Or the weight, or the componentry...

  3. #3
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    Its actually a semi-recumbent so its somewhere between a full 'bent and a crank forward. There are a number of semi designs out now for those who can't or don't want a bent yet still want the comfort and speed it offers.

  4. #4
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    My Giant Revive rides fabulous. The Day 6 ergonomic looks the same. I ride full bents too, so I can compare. The crank-forward with back bolster IMHO is the most "posture neutral" of all designs. There's not that "recumbutt" effect from compressing the glutes. I have no doubt the Day 6 feels like a lighterweight version of my now-discontinued 41lb Revive. Look it up on the Google "IMAGE" tab to notice how similar the two bikes are.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    http://day6bicycles.com/

    Just curious as to whether this was a legit 'bent...
    Who cares if it's "legit"? If you like it, ride it. Unless you're doing sanctioned racing, there are no rules.

    ------

    That said, there's a couple things about it I would be wary of.

    On a bike that has the pedals shifted far forward--in order to pedal very hard at all, you either need a VERY solid seat-back to push against, or you need VERY solid handlebars to pull on. True recumbnts all use a solid seat-back to push against but with the Day6, the seatback does not look to be built very sturdy; my suspicion is that it's simply not a bike intended to ever be pedaled hard at all (especially considering the lack of full-range gearing). Additionally, the handlebars are tall and mounted on a low stem and if you pulled on them very hard, they would very likely slip in the stem and rotate backwards (so they're no good for pulling on to pedal hard, either).

    Another issue is the saddle. The main reason these bikes have the pedals shifted forwards is to try to relieve saddle pain. If the pedals are not under the seat location, you can use a noseless saddle, and avoid the various physiology problems caused by the saddle nose totally.... so why then are two of the three Day6 seat choices conventional bicycle saddles? If you're redesigning a bicycle frame to try to avoid the pain caused by a normal bicycle seat, then it really doesn't make sense to keep using the same type of seat. .....There are other noseless seats that might fit the Day6, so you may have other options there.

    I've never rode or even seen a Day6 (or rode a Revive, for that matter) but I would guess that it's only good for very casual (moderate-effort, moderate-distance) riding. Certainly there are people who only want that, and I understand this..... but there's other choices that could do everything this bike does well, and without its limitations.

    -----

    As an alternative, I would strongly suggest you look into the RANS crank-forward bikes. The RANs bikes are done better overall, and use a better type of noseless seat. They do start at around twice as much, but then, a bicycle that hurts too much to ride is no bargain at any price.
    ~

  6. #6
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    They can be ridden a considerable distance and the bent-inspired seating helps with the comfort. To ride them, you either pull down on the handlebar or you push against the seat back for leverage. And they can be quite fast so not as fast as a true bent. The difference is there's no learning curve because they act and feel like a standard DF bike. You just get on and ride.

  7. #7
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    I'm doing some spring cleaning ( in August ) and came across the Aug/ Oct 2007 issue of Recumbent Cyclist News. It is now defunct, but "back in the day" it was considered "the" recumbent information source. Mailing and printing costs forced them to cease publishing in early 2008 I believe.

    Anyway the had a nice full page review of the Day 6. They sum up it as such.

    High Points: Comfortable, Unique, Affordable, Surprisingly good quality & very rider friendly

    Low Points: Only 21 gears, Seat back flex, wide seat base may be uncomfortable for some, performance / climbing not quite up to par.

    He calls it a decent semi recumbent for the casual cyclist who wants to ride local trails, around the neighborhood and causal fun and fitness riding. For more serious cycling ambitions, he recommends looking towards more performance oriented full recumbents.

    Hope this helps.

  8. #8
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    I think that's an entirely fair verdict Recumbent Forum posters would agree with. A nice write up on the pro and cons of semi-recumbents in that magazine. Thanks for bringing it to our attention!

  9. #9
    Senior Member edwong3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffh129 View Post
    Low Points: Only 21 gears...
    Having "only 21 gears" is a low point? That one remark alone put a huge dent in that review's credibility, but whom am I to say? Then the other remark about the "wide seat seat base may be uncomfortable for some" is also redundant. Seats, and saddles will feel different to different people, so counting that as a "low point" was unnecessary.

    More on topic: I have seen several of these Day 6 bikes being ridden on the local MUP and in my neighborhood. On one occasion, I have a chance to look at one pretty close. It was the 7 speed model and the build quality looked excellent. The rider, a woman who appeared to be in her 30's, seemed most happy, and comfortable on her Day 6.

    Years ago, I used to own a similar bike, a Giant Revive, and to this day, I feel that bicycle had the most logical ergonomics. It was a bliss to ride. The Day 6 might be very close.

    So is it a "legit" bike? Absolutely yes.

    Edward Wong III
    "Bentless in Orlando, FL"

  10. #10
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    Direct quote from the review ..." The 17 inch wide seat base is comfier than the cruiser base ( the standard seat base ) when you sit on it.However once you start riding, you'll find that the 17 inch wide base causes your hips to pivot up and down. It also seemed to make me ride higher on the bike. The 17 inch base also came into contact with the backs of my thighs, which seemed to suck the power out of my stroke on climbs. Designer Hutson said that people either liked the 17 inch base or they didn't. But the people who liked it, liked it a lot."

    As the large seat is one of it's major selling points it is important for people to know that it might not be right for them.

    By the way... Wheel and Sprocket in Wisconsin told me the exact same thing when they carried this bike. They liked it, but said the wide seat was a love it or hate it kind of thing.
    Last edited by jeffh129; 09-04-09 at 07:32 PM.

  11. #11
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    I just saw one of these for sale on Ebay this morning. Someone bought the 21 speed model but never assembled it. If you want to give one a try, it's probably a good deal. :-)

  12. #12
    brad3104
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    How is 21 speeds not enough? are u kidding me? I'm actually stripping the front der/shifters off my Vision R50 tonight and selling them because ive never shifted out of the middle cog since ive owned the bike and never plan to. Nice simple 9 speed

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