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Recumbent What IS that thing?! Recumbents may be odd looking, but they have many advantages over a "wedgie" bicycle. Discuss the in's and out's recumbent lifestyle in the recumbent forum.

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Old 01-23-04, 08:31 AM   #1
keith-pam
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high or low bottom bracket

I was deciding between a Rans V2 and a TourEasy . Does the lower bottom bracket of the Tour Easy put less strain on the knees. Does the higher bottom bracket of the Rans V2 give a better leverage for speed. There are even higher bottom brackets on bikes from Bacheeta like the Strata. Following the same reasoning I guess the people that ride these very high BB end up needing knee surgery. What is the streight and skinny on this . --Keith--
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Old 01-23-04, 02:21 PM   #2
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High Low bottom bracket

I can't say anything about high bottom brackets, but, I have an EZ-1 all I could afford, and I like it, with know pain in the knees. I worked in industry for 29 years walking on hard cement floors. I can ride 15-20 miles with no problem. I tried a mountain bike, but knees, wrist and back hurt. With the EZ-1 no pain in the knees, or any other place Roger
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Old 01-26-04, 11:34 AM   #3
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I have experience with low, midrange and high bottom brackets, I feel you are more prone to knee problems with low bottom bracket. That's not to say the midrange and high BB's are better, the jury is still out on that. I find that I'm most proficient with a midrange BB bike (BB at or 2 inches below seat level). The higher the BB the more it works your glut's, calves and hamstring and can be prone to numb toes (for some). Higher the BB, the higher the learning curve also. It's all a matter of taste, try them all for an extended period of time (if you can).
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Old 01-27-04, 09:48 AM   #4
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I was thinking of modifying a bent frame that I have from a midrange to a high BB. The existing setup is a midrange and by changing the rear wheel mount I can rotate the whole seating positon to a low seat/high BB setup. The reason is better aerodynamics...smaller cross-sectional area.

The relation between the seat and peddles will be the same so I can't see that there should be any difference in peddling dynamics.
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Old 01-31-04, 11:58 PM   #5
John C. Ratliff
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What about a Rans Stratus?

In November, I picked up a Rans Status, and I really love this bike. It has a low BB, and I have found it benificial in traffic (I commute to and from work). I found the high BB did not allow me to stop and start the way I needed to in traffic, especially on a slight hill. I rode the Stratus for many test rides, and finally decided to get it when I realized I had never had a bad ride from it. I decided on a recumbant for safety reasons, after several accidents on diamond frames.

Today, on a ride with a friend who rides an EZ-1, we saw the reason for a recumbant. Some other riders in a group had suffered a series of falls. One rider, who was leading the pack, hit a pot hole in the road, and went down. Two other riders hit him and went down, one hard. The result, they were waiting for a ride from their team mate back so one (possibly two) could get to the hospital. He had suffered what appeared to be a serious muscle injury to the shoulder. They had three broken helmets, by the way, which shows the value of helmets--no head injuries at all.

John
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Old 02-01-04, 09:50 AM   #6
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High BB--is it less safe.

.




Your point is clear , John. There is more to chosing a bike than speed, especially if you want to ride for many years. The new Stratus is a good bike especially since they made the frame stiffer. Longer frames are more stable than shorter ones and bigger wheels are safer around pot holes .I guess the best possible balance of frame length and stiffness with wheel size and BB height are needed.Then I guess it also depends on if you are 20 or 60. Some young men here in Oklahoma like to ride 2000 lb Bulls for --FUN.
Keith

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Old 02-03-04, 06:00 PM   #7
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High or low bottom bracket

[LEFT]I was deciding between a Rans V2 and a TourEasy . Does the lower bottom bracket of the Tour Easy put less strain on the knees. Does the higher bottom bracket of the Rans V2 give a better leverage for speed. There are even higher bottom brackets on bikes from Bacheeta like the Strata. Following the same reasoning I guess the people that ride these very high BB end up needing knee surgery. What is the streight and skinny on this . --Keith--

The bottom bracket height has absolutely nothing to do whatsoever with stress on the knees. Stress on the knees has more to do with trying to push too big a gear. "Spinning" is the key to protecting your knees, at least 85 rpms.To me a RANS V2 bracket height is just about perfect. High enough to get some aerodynamic benefit from it, easy to place feet on ground or back on the pedals during stop and go and yes I think it may give a little more leverage for climbing. In less than a week of riding you won't miss the lower BB of the Tour Easy. In particular, the newer (2003) V2, has redesigned steering so no tiller effect is present. Other advantages of the V2.....Less costly...you can get a V2 (or a used V2 in good condition with quality components) for a lot less than a Tour Easy. V2 will be a little bit lighter than a Tour easy. Wheel availability and selection (even off road knobbies)will be better with the V2 559rear/406front versus the 700/451 for the Tour Easy. Seat COMFORT and adjustability or removal for transporting is a lot better and easier with the V2. Those are some of the advantages I see. Don't misunderstand me, the Tour Easy is still a nice bike and it's been around for a while. Try to go clipless and remember...don't try to push too big a gear, spin, spin, spin............good luck.....and if you decide on a V2, you won't regret it.......
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Old 02-07-04, 01:19 PM   #8
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I took your advice . I took off the silly plastic pedals on my Trek 2200 exercise recumbent and put on some clipless pedals . By spining with these my knees don't bother me like they used to. --Thanks---
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Old 02-07-04, 02:08 PM   #9
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Whichever bike you choose, trade out the Primo Comet if it is speced with that tire. I just suffered my fifth flat on this tire set since November, and will be going to something different this weekend.

John
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Old 02-08-04, 09:34 AM   #10
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Flats on factory original tires

I agree with you on that Primo Comet tire. After rideing in rough country like Oklahoma (goathead stickers) and especially New Orleans (broken glass) I have found the best thing is puting a "toughy" strip between the tire and the tube. A space to protect the tube is worth more than the Kevlar liners that are put in tires. If you really want to get serious use the strip, use high thread count tires and thick tubes. In the real world I had rather have a wheel that is a second slower per mile than have a flat 10 miles from home, in the middle of nowhere with the sun going down.
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Old 02-08-04, 08:43 PM   #11
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A note of thanks

Keith-Pam,

Thanks for your suggestions above. I decided that instead of spending half the afternoon chasing tires, I'd price them at the LBS, then go to the recumbant shop maybe next weekend. In the meantime, I did put a tough strip in the rear, and will complete it with another one in the front either tonight or tomorrow night. Thanks,

John
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