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Recumbent What IS that thing?! Recumbents may be odd looking, but they have many advantages over a "wedgie" bicycle. Discuss the in's and out's recumbent lifestyle in the recumbent forum.

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Old 10-09-08, 04:00 PM   #1
kenja
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Best Trike for Logging Roads?

I've got the idea I would like to recumbent trike the dormant logging roads found in western Washington state. These would be gravel and some dirt with typically big potholes, the occasional minor washout, and a branch (or tree) laying across the road.
I'm wondering if any recumbent trike could handle being slowly driven over a four-inch diameter branch.

Right now, I'm leaning towards the Catrike Villager. http://www.catrike.com/villager.htm
Compared to the Catrike Expedition (http://www.catrike.com/expedition.htm), it's more maneuverable and has more ground clearance.
Obviously, the published 5.5" clearance of the Villager is frame clearance. Looks like the low-hanging chain would be inviting damage to the rear derailleur. I'm thinking a Rohloff internally geared hub would minimize the problem (no derailleur cage). In that case, I might be better off with a custom-built Greenspeed. Also, there is no front derailleur post on the Villager (a Schlumpf could be installed, I suppose).

I don't think I'll be camping, so luggage capacity is of secondary importance. However, I do like the idea of being able to tow a BOB or Burley trailer.

Edit: The ICE Trice T looks pretty cool--7 inches of ground clearance. http://www.ice.hpv.co.uk/trikes/t.htm
A Rohloff will mount to it but the site goes into some reasons why they don't offer it. One thing I hadn't considered: the twist grip shifter needs to be mounted at the end of the handlebar, sending the cables up into the air. I guess the twisting torque is more than the little fingers can handle.

Rigid Trice T with 26" rear wheel: http://www.ice.hpv.co.uk/trikes/t26.htm
ICE doesn't seem to have a strong marketing presence in the US.

Last edited by kenja; 10-09-08 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 10-09-08, 05:41 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenja View Post
I've got the idea I would like to recumbent trike the dormant logging roads ... I might be better off with a custom-built Greenspeed. ...(a Schlumpf could be installed, I suppose).
A good friend of mine has a GTO with both the Rohloff & the Schlumph SpeeDrive

He gives two big thumbs-up for fireroads!

Although there are no deraileurs, there is a chain tensioner that looks like a rear deraileur cage, so it is still possible to throw the chain once in a while. I suppose that the chain length could be adjusted so that the tensioner could be eliminated.
Another note, he says that he should have gotten the MountainDrive instead of the SpeeDrive.

I have a MtnDrive on a GTX and low gear is sooo looow that if I had the ground clearance, I could easily walk over logs.

Of course my favorite fireroad trick is powerslides!!!!
Greenspeeds inspire riding on the edge of traction and are definately an E ticket ride!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kenja View Post
I don't think I'll be camping, however, I do like the idea of being able to tow a BOB or Burley trailer.
I haul my 5 yr old twins in a Burley behind either Greenspeed.
In this case, the GTT (named Tigger).
Greenspeed/Burley...GREAT combination!

I use a B-O-B behind my Hurricane and it works really well!

Here's my oldests blog with video. All the above bents are in it....somewhere.

http://oliverbunten-blog.blogspot.co...ay-parade.html
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Old 10-10-08, 04:27 AM   #3
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Might be worth looking at a KMX kart there is a video of one being ridden UP a short set of stairs, they just road straight into the bottom step and the oversized tyres did the rest.
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Old 10-10-08, 06:09 AM   #4
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+1 on KMX Karts. They are built like 3-wheeled BMX bikes. A bit heavy, but perfect for something like fire roads.
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Old 10-10-08, 11:58 AM   #5
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Thanks for the replies. Dr., I saw your comments in another thread that Schlumpf + Rohloff + FireRoads = GoodThing. Is that "button" on the Schlumpf hard to hit when wearing SPD cleats (men's size US 13 shoe)?

The KMX website has gorgeous profile shots. I didn't find the video but I haven't seen any steps near the logging roads I'm thinking about. It's the "up and over" maneuver I wonder about. I think it's Greenspeed that offers optional hand grips to assist getting in and out of the trike; I don't know if they would be useful for hefting the machine over obstacles.

I have an X-seam of 46" and the KMX's go to 44"

Edit: http://www.kmxkarts.co.uk/community/videos/
US site: http://www.kmxus.com/

Last edited by kenja; 10-10-08 at 12:23 PM.
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Old 10-11-08, 12:49 AM   #6
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Picking up a trike is pretty easy, plenty of frame to grab at least on the GS's.
Just a matter of a quick test pick up.
My GT3 tended to like hanging sideways, but you won't need extra handles from my experience.
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Old 10-11-08, 04:23 AM   #7
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This is a kmx going up stairs with an electric assist.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irO27SNTDyI

I find the easiest way is to grab the back wheel and pull. That should get over a log with out too much effort?
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Old 10-11-08, 10:54 AM   #8
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I had the chance to ride a Catrike Trail yesterday (thanks Jim!). It "hefts" much easier than I would have suspected.

Is anyone making quads besides Utah Trikes? http://www.utahtrikes.com/
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