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  1. #1
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    Who owns a Sun EZ3 trike?

    if you have one, can you tell me what kinds of problems you've had with this trike? and how the problems were solved. thankx

  2. #2
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    I've got an EZ3 USX (the new USS one). Admittedly, I've only had it for a couple of weeks (it's my first recumbent), and the only problem, per se, was that the front derailleur needed adjustment (wasn't quite making the big chainring) but that was most likely just cable stretch. The Wellgo pedals it comes with are crap, so I swapped over the Sakae pedals from my GT Karakoram K2 (which is now for sale, and I'll knock off a few bucks for the cheap pedals (-. Still getting my recumbent legs, so it doesn't have a whole lot of miles on it yet, but for a low end (at least as far as 'bents go) bike, it seems pretty well put together.

  3. #3
    EZ3 USX USX Sid's Avatar
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    Got a EZ3 USX(same as above) for my fiance and, with just over 40 miles on it, the only real problem is that it seems no one tightened down the bolts. We've lost one of the bolts that hold the seat-adjust 'rods' on the seat and the screw that holds the wire that the chain's plastic tube are connected to(that got confusing, huh), and I got to a few other bolts before they jiggled anough to come all the way out.

    Other than that, the trike has been astounding.

    I would just suggest buying it from a GREAT LBS and check all the nuts and bolts before every other ride.

  4. #4
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    I have ~50 miles on mine. The biggest concern I have is in mid-gears the rear derailure swings within 1/2 of the ground. I've checked the settings, and they look right. So I wouldn't consider this an "off-road" or even "rough-road" bike unless the rear wheels are oversized, or you stay at the high/low end of the spectrum.

    The dealer that built mine said it came to him minus a few screws. So I have random bolts that don't match the rest of the bike, but it's functional! Certainly turns heads, and has made a good commuter so far.

    Oh, one last think, the "foldable" option doesn't seem very useful. there's no quick release to fold, the chain guide looks like it will get in the way, and once it's folded it's in an even more awkward config for storing/transporting.

    Still, for the price tag I had no other real options with the most desireable feature on a communter, under-seat steering.

  5. #5
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    The rear derailer is correct...the only way that you can get it higher up would be to change the front wheel to a 20 inch to match the other two....that's what I'm going to do with my EZ3SX.

  6. #6
    EZ3 USX USX Sid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beatle bailey
    The rear derailer is correct...the only way that you can get it higher up would be to change the front wheel to a 20 inch to match the other two

    The USX model(the one owned by Mr Kermit, GeorgeVW and myself) is 20x3, the thing is STILL silly close to the ground.

  7. #7
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    I've come to the conclusion that the EZ3SX is a pile of junk. Chinese crap.

  8. #8
    Chuck
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    Quote Originally Posted by beatle bailey
    if you have one, can you tell me what kinds of problems you've had with this trike? and how the problems were solved. thankx
    Hi.... I just got an EZ3 UBX and love it. I am a terrible bike rider and wanted to still ride. This does the trick. My main problem is the top chain protector tube moves forward and will stick in the derailer's chain channel. Causing the front derailer to stop functioning. I have tied the chain protector spring to the frame to stop the forward movement. I agree with everyone's comment on the bottom derailer being so low to the ground and have yet to find a solution. Being a large guy, I am constantly wondering if it will hit the ground one day.

    Regards,
    Chuck Watson

  9. #9
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    I too, am a big guy. Just being big isn't going to cause the derailer to hit bottom. I figure the only way you're going to hit the rear derailer on the road is if you drop a wheel into a deep hole....that's why I'm very careful to stay out of deep holes.

  10. #10
    Senior Member jawnn's Avatar
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    knee pain

    SHORT CRANKS.. 130MM creates a deficiency in the ‘swipe threw pull back’ factor. u could save a lot of money by drilling and tapping the cranks at 150mm.
    I had some pain relief because my knees are not bent as much as when pushing threw the dead zone that pushes up the kneecaps, but still hurt my self by pushing too hard. It’s a bit harder to climb hills with because there is less leverage and uses slightly different muscle sets. It’s like cranking in a higher gear, so you need lower gearing for hill climbing.
    I am sure that elliptical chain rings can help also, as they help get your feet threw the dead zones. But I hear that Biopace should be rotated for them to work. The use of shorter cranks would be possible with out the swipe threw pull back problem and may not need a lower gear to compensate for the lack of leverage, don’t count on it. Also climbing with a faster cadence is easier because it helps you threw the dead zone at the top of the crank circle.


    GEAR INCH FORMULAS. Obviously every one is different, even at different times. So you can use this only to for estimation with 170mm cranks. If an average healthy man can sustain a power output of about 0.33 hp, or 10890 ft-lbs per minute, up to 45 minutes. Or .2hp = 6600ft.-lbs/min. for 1.5 to 2 hours for climbing those long mountain roads. If you're trying to climb a 14% grade with a combined weight of 390 pounds with a power output of 10890 ft-lbs/min, divide by (.14 grade x 390 lbs) = 199.4505 feet per minute. Now, if your cadence is 80 rpm at the crank, and you're moving at 199.4505 ft/min x 12”= 2393.406 inches per minute, divide by (80rpm x pi)= 9.52gi. [70rpm= 10.88gi and 60rpm= 12.69gi]. It is best to calculate at 80rpm cadence to give yourself room for error in your strength level. If you’re forced to slow down to 60rpm you’re pushing too hard. Over 80rpm your wasting too much energy just heating your legs. An approximate 14% grade is the maximum that I can pedal aprox. 390lb at 12.5gi. (slower than 60rpm) resting my legs every 20ft or so. Don’t worry most hills are never more than 9%. To move a quarter ton up a 10% grade 10.4 gear inches would be needed.
    The best way to measure the road grade is to hold a level, one end to the road surface and measure the other ends height when level. The grade is the vertical distance divided by the horizontal.
    Gear inch: driving sprockets divided by driven gear sprockets, multiplied by measured diameter of drive wheel and tire. A set of gears equaling a 20” is like pedaling a 20” wheel with out gears. See bikeatwork.com for more info.
    POWER ASSISTANCE. The most efficient motor for an HPV is a hub motor. The only place to put one is at eh end of the left side axle, and you would need a new axle made at a machine shop. I don’t know if they make one that fits. It maybe better to strap a motor on the side of the axle and connect it to a single freewheel with a BMX chain.
    Last edited by jawnn; 06-01-05 at 02:04 PM.

  11. #11
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    I took a trial ride on a USX and found it strange compared to the LWB I own. Cycle seemed to be a bit tippy and the thrill of leaning into a turn was gone. I am guessing that lifting wheels becomes part of the learning curve on a Delta and slowing down a bit on the curves becomes a must. I do plan on giving it another try at my LBS in the near future. I am interested in some of the advantages of the trikes. (stopping while climbing grade without having to get off- Visibility and balance) I would like to get a look at the tadpole when Sun can get them in the shops.
    Last edited by Aceman13; 08-16-04 at 05:29 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member jawnn's Avatar
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    CLANDESTINE CONSPIRACY.

    How many years has it been that you haven’t seen the word ‘sprocket’ used correctly? Some where along the line some one got tired of calling the geared discs of a free wheel ”sprocket wheels” and called them sprockets. This led to more illiterate confusion and people called them cogs. Cogs are the toothed gears that fit into other gears of the same configuration. Unfortunately people are not going to use it correctly until they see it in print, and the editors refuse to use it correctly because they are afraid that people won’t recognize it. Ubiquitous illiteracy propagates its self.

    sprock·et P Pronunciation Key (spr k t) n. 1. Any of various toothlike projections arranged on a wheel rim to engage the links of a chain. 2. A cylinder with a toothed rim that engages in the perforations of photographic or movie film to pull it through a camera or projector.

    cog1 P Pronunciation Key (k g, kôg) n. 1. One of a series of teeth, as on the rim of a wheel or gear, whose engagement transmits successive motive force to a corresponding wheel or gear. 2. A cogwheel. 3. A subordinate member of an organization who performs necessary but usually minor or routine functions.

    sprocket wheel n. A wheel rimmed with toothlike projections, used to engage the links of a chain in a pulley or drive system.
    Last edited by jawnn; 06-04-05 at 02:49 PM.

  13. #13
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    Ya, I had trouble with the seat back hinge too, for one thing, the bolt is in crooked, one of the holes is lower than the other....just another problem of the bike being built by idiots in China. But as far as heavier tires for heavy riders are concerned, I haven't found that I needed them. I was about 275 lbs, when I started riding my trike and after 300 miles changed to Primo Comets, for the low rolling resistance and because one of the Kenda quest brand tires had a side wall malfunction....about 4 inches of the sidewall on one of the 20 inchers blew out when I was going quite fast down a long hill....gee what a surprise that was.
    "Oh Yeah?"

  14. #14
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    The EZ3 trike is good for what we use it for. My wife is 65 and has balance problems attempting to ride a diamond frame, so she gets out in the fresh air on the EZ3. The rides she takes are very short, no more than a mile. Her speed is about 5 miles per hour. The cost of the tryke was not that much and it sure beats a stationary bicycle machine that is too boaring to use and never gets used.

  15. #15
    ez3 usx
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    i have a ez3usx and have put about 250 miles on it.the only problem so far is the pivot below the shock has come loose ands i put it back together with lock-tite,,,end of problem so far.

    my woife had the ez3 sx and the secondary chain that drives the wheels sprocket kept comming loose,even tho i lock-tited it.i returned her bike and they were kind enough to let me trade hers in on a usx.

    i ordered electric motor kits for both bikes from www.wildnernessenergy.com.one motor is a brushed and one is a brushless design.i didn't have a problem mounting the front wheel hub motor on either bike.i've had the bikes for about 2 months.when i first got the motor kits neither of them worked and i had to order new controllers and throttles.thgey made me pay for them which i wasnt happy about but they did send me a refund.i am happy with the motor kits i got.in my opinion if i had it to do again i'd order the brushed kit for both bikes

  16. #16
    ez3 usx
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    my wife had a ez3sx and after about 150 miles of the chain comming loose we traded it on a usx.the chain that connects to the pedqals was ok,it was the final drive chain sprocket that hooked on the axel that kept comming loose.even after i used blue locktite on it

  17. #17
    ez3 usx
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    WOW
    sorry about the typos,,,guess it shows why i ride a 3wheeler.you wont believe this.i was hit by a car,flew over the top,had a few bad accidents where they tend to tow my car away on flat beds,and survived a bone marrow transplant for leukemia...so not to bore you but somehow i made it thru that to now try and not get squished on my new bike.just kidding,but i do have some braion damage and am a bit creeky in thew morning.that was creeky not cranky that doesnt help.excuse me,,,while i crunch a few bones in place.and yes i am for real just bare with,,,and not r bottom
    thanks and
    undestand why i have a a few typos and a electric motor on my bike
    happy trails and dodge those squirells

  18. #18
    Senior Member jawnn's Avatar
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    EZ3 USX


    The seat back henge is the worst problem its is loose and now way to fix it. all the steel frame seats they make wobble. The aluminum frame seats may not.


    FRAME. The frame hinge bolt kept working loose making a horrible creaking sound. I finally replaced the post bolt with a solid bolt and lock nuts, obviously it doesn’t look as good. New ‘lock tight’ may work , but this hinge moves a lot. Becarful not to seperate the henge when changing bolts, there are fiber washers that can't easly be put back in. The midsection suspension is mostly for looks and ease of folding the frame. Which is beefy enough to last for 20 years, even if its not made of aircraft grade chromium molybdenum alloy steel. However Sun Bicycles are not very clear about the limit on the ‘life time’ warranty. But they do hint at not warranting the steel if it looks like its been flexed too much, don’t bother asking for a new frame. I have added approximately 370lbs with no ill effects except that the tires look like they could use more air. If you have long legs there is a longer front section you can order.

    After 10 months one of the seat support arm tabs ripped off the frame because I was letting too much weight be on it. I will have to reinforce all the tabs with tubing cut in half with slot to fit over the tabs and brazed on. Using a two wheeled trailer is the only way to get the weight off.

    BRAKES. The disc brakes are both on the same right hand lever. The bolts on these brakes are rusting, and should be replaced with stainless steel. These cheep ‘Aerozip’ brakes use Shimano pads. Bike Nashbar has affordable versions for half the price. A ‘T’ handled 5mm hex wrench is needed to adjust the disc brakes, but it’s easyer than V brakes.

    I think all trikes would benefit from self-equalizing hydraulic duel reservoir brakes on the same lever. The front V brake helps keep it centered while braking hard, but it won’t stop the trike.

    CABLES. The cable to the front brake caught under the under-seat steering stem, the cable tubing should be long enough to go over the steering head set stem.

    STEERING. The steering bars are adjustable for arm length and width. The first winter the handlebars rusted, but the 14ft-turning diameter feels good. Unlike over seat steerng, the underseat steering relieves all the pressure from my carpel tunnel syndrome.

    GEAR SHIFTERS. In cold wet weather the grip shifters are difficult to operate. With gloves even worse. I used bar end thumb shifters. Then I had to use a side mount mirror, see calhouncycle.com

    PEDALS. Cheap but not the worst. the ‘swipe threw pull back’ action works well with out cleats or straps if you place the arch of your shoe on the pedal rather than the ball of your foot.

    REAR SPROCKETS. There are no cogs on this machine (see your dictionary). The old fashioned free wheel is located on a machined plug set on the right side axle of this model. Kelvin at angle tech says that the freewheel assembly can be pried off the axle with a large screwdriver. I could not get it loose. This is what I did: remove the left side left side axle assembly and throw out the rusty bolts. Then use a 3” gear puller form a car parts store with a 6” diameter reach. To remove the assembly I had to put a nut on the point of the gear puller, grind it round to keep from damaging the end cap threads.

    I drilled recess hole for the setscrews into the plug that hold the free wheel, to keep the puller from pulling the disc off with out the whole thing. Longer setscrews were needed.

    After grinding flat for the vice to grip I placed it face up in the vice, used a shimano freewheel removal tool with a large wrench and a breaker bar. Chain whips are for the new cassettes only.

    To put the freewheel assembly back on the axle with an 11-34, I had to grind off some of the bolt plate, I’m not sure why it wouldn’t fit. Place the key bar in the slot and slip the plug on, then tap the whole thing into place with a hammer. Don’t forget to grease the threads.

    AXLES. Sun Bicycles ignored my attempts to get info about what kind of metal the axles are made of. Fearing the possibility of rust I tried to pull out the axels to lube them, and discovered that they are press fitted to the bearings. This will make it difficult to change the bearings. And there is already rust on the external part of the axle. But the folks at Angle lake cyclery say they will tap out. I cu the bottom tube to a 12” because the chain was having alignment problems. Feeding the chain threw the tubes on a cold day is a bugger; carry hand cleaner and a towel and rubber gloves. My mechanic says that Shimano Hyperglide chain is the best, not sram.

    CHAIN MANAGEMENT. The rear derailleur clears the road by only one inch in the lowest gear. The ABS chain tube is starting to fray after only 6 months. The wire that holds the tubes broke and coat hanger wire was not a good replacement, but will work if the wire to the bottom tube is stretched to the rear.

    BEARINGS. The 21mm rear axles (cambered as on the aluminum Ez3) are supported by cartridge bearings. A large square key bar is used to lock the hubs on the axles. There are no bearings in the rear hubs. This is good because I hate to throw out good wheels just because bearing races wear out. The front hub has shielded bearings. (rubber cap with metal shield inside)

    The head set bearings must be the cheapest also, and will need replacing with a sealed cartridge unit rather than lubing.

    The bottom bracket’s crank bearing assembly lock ring kept working loose. I replaced it with a new sealed bearing shimano “krank box” as some one would say. 68x127mm spindle. Remember to grease your threads. The old loose balls went in the trash where they belong.

    TIRES AND WHEELS. The 65psi tires that came with it are worthless. After I had blowouts on both rear tires just above the beads on the disc brake sides, where the lateral forces are the worst on a delta trike. I replaced the rear tires with 110psi 2.1” primo comet extra thick puncture resistant tires sold under the blurb of having Kevlar belts, but do not say Kevlar on the tire. I think they are the pre Kevlar models. [‘Hostel Shoppe’ has 2.5” Greenspeed mudguard fenders]. And a 1.5” primo comet Kevlar tire on the front, I hate getting flats, so I added thorn resistant tubes as well. Then the non-drive side wheel broke a spoke after having the wheels trued on the warranty. I believe it was mostly due to a spoke being left loose by the wheel-building machine. But there are strong lateral forces that loosen the spokes.

    I had custom hand built wheels done for only $133@ on the cheap hubs with heavy-duty BMX box wall BFR rims, triple crossed spokes, (we couldn’t find swaged spokes to fit). I think regular duty wheels may be ok for light duty people, if you don’t carry groceries. I load them with a combined weight of 450lbs. Anglelakecyclery.com can get extra hubs, and make there own spokes. I intend to use Greenspeed s new puncture proof tires.

    The out side spokes tension on (the longer side) works them self's loose every few weeks so I am going to have the wheels made with symmetric tension and length. They will be strong like front wheels. I think it must be a myth that the disc brake side of a wheel needs a steeper angle of spoke.

    TRUING STAND. To mount the rear wheels on a truing stand you need 24mm x 9mm(8.97MM TO BE EXACT) sealed bearings mounted on a bicycle axle made for sealed cartridge hubs: with a 72.5mm shoulder width. Call Angle lake cyclery near seattle at 206-878-7457. The 'Enduro 609 RS' bearings are so small that I had to wrap them with tape to make them snug. The 709 bearings have an O ring but may fit too tightly. I got a 3/8th inch axle and it did not fit, with 6000RSL bearings and a nylon plastic bushing and tree large washers I was able to hold the wheel on the stand, but the axle turns with the wheel. I recomend having a machine shop make an axle make and axle for the 609 bearings, out of mild steel.

    It's hell trying to get parts for this trike. The only way to get hubs for the rear wheels is to buy one of their cheap wheels and scrap the rim and spokes.

    The out side spokes tension on (the longer side) works them self's loose every few weeks so I was going to have the wheels made with symmetric tension and length, but the average high quality shop truing stand can not fit an off center wheel. So I will have to use my cheap Manura stand that wobbles a bit, but is more flexible in the fitting. Actually a good ridged truing stand could be altered to hold the wheels. They will be strong like front wheels. It is a myth that the disc brake side of a wheel needs a steeper angle of spoke on trike. Hase delta trikes are made with rims centered between the flanges, and their trikes are virtually the same as this cheap nock-off.

    The reason the wheels were made like bike wheels is simply that they were made on wheel building machines, and they couldn’t possibly afford to make a new machine to tension the spokes symmetrically

    GEARS. The gear ratio is too high for steep hills even with my large leg muscles 76 to 20.3 (80 to 21.4 w/2” tires) gear inches, 170mm pedal arms x 52/42/30-sprocket chain rings with a 13-28-7speed free wheel. If you use a 11-34 mega range freewheel on the rear the front sprockets could be changed to a 48/36/26 for a gear range of 87.2 to 15.2gi and they will fee higher still with short cranks. If using a 44/32/22 crankset your gi will be 80 to 12.9 and you can’t use a fourth chain ring.

    The best way to get low enough gears for a really steep hill is to install a 4th chain ring on to the crank. I used a Mountain Tamer triple adapter (I had to use their special flat head 12mm bolts to make space for the chain, be careful not to strip the aluminum threads in the crank.) [mountaintamer@abundantadventures.com] With an 18-sprocket chain ring for 12.8gi, which enables me to climb a 14% grade with almost 400lbs-combined weight. After I changed to shorter cranks I changed the free wheel to an 11-34 shimano ‘megarange’ that gave me a 17.6 inch gear and 10.5 with the 18-sprocket chain ring (on 2” tires).

    A quad adaptor won’t fit this crank with out grinding off the bosses accurately. To bring the crank back over enough to shift up to the largest chain ring, I had to grind about 1/32 inch off the tapered flats of the spindle.

    To shift down to the 4th ring I must stop and move the chain by pushing the chain tube over while cranking backwards by hand. I moved the chain tube up a bit to keep the chain off the bottom of the derailleur cage.


    More info? funnyfarmart.com/ez.htm
    Last edited by jawnn; 06-11-05 at 02:17 PM.

  19. #19
    Honorable Member beowoulfe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jawnn
    <snip> also added a 4th cahin ring to climb 14% grade with 390lbs combined. ,<unsnip>
    14% grade!!! I've done 15% grades and it was TOUGH! I can't imagine a 14% on an EZ3.
    Greenspeed GTO 1027

  20. #20
    Senior Member geeklpc1985's Avatar
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    I had the EZ-3 USX, for 5 or 6 months put over 4000 miles on it during the summer, work great, BUT during the school year I broke the frame 2 times. It's not for high miles, the tires go fast, and you kill the derailure. I bike store gave up and give me a new bike, a touring bike. On the other hand, I loved that bike, and might get one for a weekend ride when I get old. Also my mother has the EZ-3 trike, only thing with that is the baring go fast, if your a fast rider, or if your the kind of person who takes it on two wheels.
    Super Geek
    2004 Martin Novato: 10613 miles, Ride in Peace (DOD: 12/05/06)
    Max Speed: 40 mph

  21. #21
    Senior Member jawnn's Avatar
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    UNDERSTANDING DELTA TRIKE WHEELS

    PIPPA GARNER (builder of quadrocycles): Well, yeah. I retightened the spokes on my canted wheels twice and finally got rid of the pinging noises, but I had the problem on 2 different cycles with canted wheels, one built by Varna in Canada, so the spokes must be tighter than what is considered conventional in wheel building. Certainly the application has something to do with it. There's no question that asymmetrically tensioned spokes are subject to more stress than wheels with the rims centered between the flanges.

    HASE DELTA TRIKES: *yes, all spokes have the same length (172 mm) and so they also have the same tension. A symmetric bike wheel is the strongest solution, even with disc brakes. Both flanges on our wheels are the same size. The Ez3-usx is a cheap copy of our trike. Best regards Rüdiger Knopp Diese, hase-bikes.com

    LIGHT FOOTCYCLES: Smaller wheels are much stronger in almost all respects. They would suffer less distortion from braking, as well, because of the steeper angulations and shorter spokes with less give. Rod Miner Lightfoot Cycles Inc. 179 Leavens Road, Darby, MT 59829 USA , lightfootcycles.com

    GERD SHRANER (the art of wheel building): for years I worked with out a tensiometer, being under the false impression that instinct and experience were enough. When I finally started using one I discovered that even my mood on any given day gave me different result. To adjust your rim off center on the axle, just visually determine the spoke length. Then open the rim calipers on the truing stand and let only one side touch the rim. You may need some new nipples because they could disintegrate during adjustment.

    BROX QUADROCYCLES: On wheels with low spoke tension on one side you may experience the disc brake pulling the tight spokes before the loose side. Centering the rim between the flanges will eliminate this action, but you still need higher tension on the spokes because of the compression factor from lateral forces. We use symmetrically dished wheels with disc brakes, and box wall rims. Brox.co.uk

    BOB BRYANT (RCN magazine): In a hard turn most of the weight goes to the out side spokes so they should be at least as tight as the inside spokes, because after all the axle does stand on the spokes. The reason that Sun bicycles built the wheels like bike wheels is simply that they couldn’t afford to build a new wheel-building machine and still keep the price down. If you paid $265 for your wheels they should be willing to build them correctly.
    Last edited by jawnn; 06-22-05 at 12:58 PM. Reason: human powered vehicles

  22. #22
    Greetings Earthlings! bcspain's Avatar
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    My wife took on of these on a test ride today. She liked it, but I am concerned not so much with the quality of the bike, it seemed adequate, but more with the rear derailleur.

    Is there another trike in the same price range?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcspain
    My wife took on of these on a test ride today. She liked it, but I am concerned not so much with the quality of the bike, it seemed adequate, but more with the rear derailleur.

    Is there another trike in the same price range?

    The rear derailer is one thing that I've not had a problem with, and I have about 1000 miles on the EZ3. Unless you drop into a hole deep enough for the rear derailer to hit the road, I doubt that you'll have any problems with it either.
    The bike shop replaced all the bearings in this trike, and now the only problem that I still have is a knocking sound that comes and goes......it's a mystery, but no one seems to have an answer as to where this sound comes from.
    When I'm riding it, it sounds like it's in the left rear part of the rear axle. Of course when you take it in to the mechanics, then I can't get the trike to make the sound. And the mechanics look at you like you're a nut.
    My wife just bought a red EZ3 too, so far she's not had any problems, but then she's only got about 12 miles on it......time will tell!!!!!
    "Oh Yeah?"

  24. #24
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    I am in the market for a Recumbent Trike. I have a budget of under 1000 dollars so the only bike I can look at is the EZ3. I am about 360 pounds and roughly 6 ft tall. I guess my question is will this bike be ok for a first bike? And what should I do to make sure I can make the bike last a long time?

  25. #25
    Senior Member EZ-SportAX Curt's Avatar
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    Sidster, heres one on E-Bay someone is trying to sell for a good price. My wife rides one just like this and I ride it sometimes myself and I weigh 280 poundes, we had ours for two months now and it seems this thing will last for ever.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...148458765&rd=1

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