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  1. #26
    Junior Member
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    Hand-built LWB recumbent, Cruzbike conversion on a SpeedOne 20" folding frame.
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    I purchased this frame after viewing hundreds of images of both assembled and converted Cruzbikes. The placement of the hinge, seat height and the interesting rear suspension all looked just right. The frame is from SpeedOne, of Taiwan. They offer the frame with front suspension but I didn't think I'd need it and saved a few bucks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shahmatt View Post
    @ cplager,

    Thanks for the link. This is indeed worth pondering about.

    @ chrisblessing,

    A really nice piece of work.

    Did you pick the bike for the job? Or did you have the bike on hand before deciding to convert it?

  2. #27
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisblessing View Post
    I purchased this frame after viewing hundreds of images of both assembled and converted Cruzbikes. The placement of the hinge, seat height and the interesting rear suspension all looked just right. The frame is from SpeedOne, of Taiwan. They offer the frame with front suspension but I didn't think I'd need it and saved a few bucks.
    Thanks for this. I'm looking at the Speedone website and don't see frames on offer. . Did you contact them specifically requesting for a frame?

    Secondly, I believe a faster fold may be possible if the cruzbike seat could be split into two parts, i.e. into the back rest and bottom seat. If the back rest can be attached to the seat post, and bottom rest on to the frame in front of the top tube hinge then removing the seat during folding may not be necessary. Would you agree?

  3. #28
    Junior Member
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    Hello Shahmatt,

    I purchased the frame on Ebay. I think SpeedOne primarily sells unbranded frames to assemblers; I've never actually seen a SpeedOne in the wild. *

    As for the seat, I'm inclined to agree with you, but, frankly, it only takes me a moment to remove the seat (I don't use clamps), and another to separate the two parts. I use a plastic-head bolt and wing nut, so it can be done by hand. Honestly, the seat is off and broken down in about 3 minutes.

    To fold this bike and get it into its carry bag takes about 4 minutes. To do some minor dis-assembly and get it into my Dahon Airporter Mini takes about 15 minutes. The only fly in the ointment is that I have to leave one wheel out. I'm still puzzling that last bit out.
    Last edited by chrisblessing; 08-05-13 at 06:37 AM. Reason: more information

  4. #29
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shahmatt View Post
    Secondly, I believe a faster fold may be possible if the cruzbike seat could be split into two parts, i.e. into the back rest and bottom seat. If the back rest can be attached to the seat post, and bottom rest on to the frame in front of the top tube hinge then removing the seat during folding may not be necessary. Would you agree?
    I use wing nuts to attach the bottom to the seat back on my Cruzbike folder for exactly that reason. Works fairly well.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  5. #30
    Senior Member osco53's Avatar
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    As I sit and ponder this type of drive train I think back to what the auto Industry learned from front wheel drive.

    A shorter drive line,, a smaller drive shaft is lighter, spins up faster,
    Pulling a thing is more efficient than pushing, Trains are proof of this.

    Routing the chain even with the super efficient T-Cycle Idlers is still more drag than direct chain lines,
    Re routing the chain on the power side is even less efficient than the slack side, doing both,

    It's not rocket science..

    Every pound of rotational mass removed has the same effect as loosing TWO pounds of static weight on a two wheeled vehicle.
    The Above would also apply to ounces I would think..

    I contemplated this on, 'The Tree Of Woe' for a fortnight.....
    Scott Aspect 940 29er, Tour Easy LE, Sun EZ-3 sx, Walmart Thruster :P

  6. #31
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by osco53 View Post
    Every pound of rotational mass removed has the same effect as loosing TWO pounds of static weight on a two wheeled vehicle.
    The Above would also apply to ounces I would think..
    This is only true for accelerating and not for climbing (AND chains rotate a lot more slowly than wheels). And as big of a fan of MBB bikes as I am, I would use saved chain weight as a big factor.

    No idlers is a big plus. And stiffer bottom bracket means less losses too.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  7. #32
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    I use wing nuts to attach the bottom to the seat back on my Cruzbike folder for exactly that reason. Works fairly well.
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisblessing View Post
    Hello Shahmatt,

    I purchased the frame on Ebay. I think SpeedOne primarily sells unbranded frames to assemblers; I've never actually seen a SpeedOne in the wild. *

    As for the seat, I'm inclined to agree with you, but, frankly, it only takes me a moment to remove the seat (I don't use clamps), and another to separate the two parts. I use a plastic-head bolt and wing nut, so it can be done by hand. Honestly, the seat is off and broken down in about 3 minutes.

    To fold this bike and get it into its carry bag takes about 4 minutes. To do some minor dis-assembly and get it into my Dahon Airporter Mini takes about 15 minutes. The only fly in the ointment is that I have to leave one wheel out. I'm still puzzling that last bit out.
    Thanks for the information.

    Did you have to engineer the wingnut clamp for the seat? Does the seat come with the necessary holes/grooves etc. in order for a wingnut clamp to go in? Would this require a workshop with specific tools?

    I notice that both of you have chosen aluminium frame donor bikes. Is there any specific reason for choosing this material? The reason I ask is that isn't aluminium more brittle than steel? If so, and since the frame is being loaded differently from what was intended at the design stage would not steel have been a safer frame material?

  8. #33
    Junior Member
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    Shahmatt, the wing nut I described was simply to bolt the back and bottom of the seat. The attachment of the seat to the top bar uses a mount provided by Cruzbike. It's attached to the seat bottom, and fits over the tube. Hose clamps are used to secure it. As I have a rectangular frame I couldn't really use it, so I did machine a part which worked well but was heavy. I've since done away with it altogether. I use only a small felt pad and some Velcro to secure the seat, and so far I've had no issues. So, when I remove the seat I just undo the seat post clamp, and pull the seat away. Then I separate the two parts. As I stated, it's fast and easy.

    As for aluminum, it's absolutely not too rigid for this application, and it's certainly lighter. And I don't believe my weight distribution is appreciably different than were this a conventional setup.

    Chris

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