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  1. #26
    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassKnees View Post
    My view is that if a motorist can't see me without a flag, they're not going to see me with one.
    The main advantage a flag gives me is when there are cars around, people know there's something behind that car with a flag on it.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Number400's Avatar
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    I am way more aggressive about taking the lane now. I put it to good use the other day on a twisty downhill that has no shoulders and bad asphalt on the right side.

    An SUV was coming up behind (thanks helmet mirror) and I could see three approaching cars way before the SUV could. I took the lane, put my left hand out behind and when it was safe to pass, I waved them by. They actually waited longer until they could see it was clear and I was very pleased about that.

    I did recently add rear blinkies to all my bikes, run a headlight and do believe in them even if only to show motorists that I am attentive to safety. I feel more at ease and even more "official" when taking the lane when I am running lighting.
    Barbossa: I'm disinclined to acquiesce to your request. Means "no".

    http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a...zzgjij&z=a.gif

  3. #28
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    GlassKnees, I posted a comment on the video page, but the other side is that by riding on the shoulder, you invited that pass. Legally, being on the shoulder is the same as being off the road. (The white fog line is treated as a curb.) So technically, he wasn't required to move over because you weren't in his lane, or even on the road.

  4. #29
    Junior Member
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    Sun Ciy - Georgetown, Texa
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    Custome Wateford, ICE Vortex recumbent trike
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    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    The main advantage a flag gives me is when there are cars around, people know there's something behind that car with a flag on it.
    I used to think like that as well. But I'm convinced that a motorist is not going to notice a flag that is in front or to the side f a car in front of him. The vast majority of motorists focus strictly on the vehicle in front of them and rarely take in the bigger picture.

    There is a common perception held by many that simply because a recumbent is lower to the ground, it is harder to see. To some extent this is true if your view is blocked, say, by bushes or other obstructions. But I maintain that a flag on a skinny pole is not going to help. It is incumbent for trike pilots to be aware of such potential hazard and take appropriate action.
    Glass Knees

  5. #30
    Senior Member osco53's Avatar
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    Be a Truck, Be a Bicycle

    Mack Truck drivers "Bull" through traffic while the bicycle rider "sneaks". The trucker demands the right of way, but bicycle rider concedes it quickly. The truck driver assumes everyone sees him, the bicycle rider assumes she's Invisible.
    To be a safe and successful inner city motorcyclist/bicylist you must combine these elements,
    both these contrasting approaches must be practiced at all times.

    We've all been told to "Ride defensively" but If you do only that you will get pushed around, ignored and possibly run over. The aggressive rider is in equal danger for different reasons, he doesn't realize that car drivers constantly make mistakes.

    You must find a balance, Occupy your space like the truck driver, but concede like the bicyclist.
    THE TRUCK:
    Making yourself visible as a truck is a fascinating objective, involving mirrors, lane position, vehicle type, driver type, blind spots, road conditions, following distances, clothing, head light, mental outlook and even the time of day.
    BE CONSPICUOUS while believing nobody sees you-ever. You must learn to make yourself seen.
    THE BYCYCLE:
    You can pretend your a truck but your really a bicyclist. Act like the truck but never insist on your right of way,
    Always give way when your challenged,,, ALWAYS.

    When someone cuts you off don't get pissed and take action against them, be calm and move on. Use your skill and move away, other people will not see a near miss, only a pissed off cyclist. Better yet let them see a skilled, calm, cool, expert Biker. You want respect on the Mean streets,,, Earn it.



    Odd, I just don't have close calls, really I swear.
    I have moments where I'm challenged, when I get real busy on the bike, In traffic..

    Just sayin,,,,
    Scott Spark 760, Tour Easy LE, Sun EZ-3 sx, Walmart Thruster :P

  6. #31
    Senior Member rtool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by osco53 View Post
    Mack Truck drivers "Bull" through traffic while the bicycle rider "sneaks". The trucker demands the right of way, but bicycle rider concedes it quickly. The truck driver assumes everyone sees him, the bicycle rider assumes she's Invisible.
    To be a safe and successful inner city motorcyclist/bicylist you must combine these elements,
    both these contrasting approaches must be practiced at all times.

    We've all been told to "Ride defensively" but If you do only that you will get pushed around, ignored and possibly run over. The aggressive rider is in equal danger for different reasons, he doesn't realize that car drivers constantly make mistakes.

    You must find a balance, Occupy your space like the truck driver, but concede like the bicyclist.
    THE TRUCK:
    Making yourself visible as a truck is a fascinating objective, involving mirrors, lane position, vehicle type, driver type, blind spots, road conditions, following distances, clothing, head light, mental outlook and even the time of day.
    BE CONSPICUOUS while believing nobody sees you-ever. You must learn to make yourself seen.
    THE BYCYCLE:
    You can pretend your a truck but your really a bicyclist. Act like the truck but never insist on your right of way,
    Always give way when your challenged,,, ALWAYS.

    When someone cuts you off don't get pissed and take action against them, be calm and move on. Use your skill and move away, other people will not see a near miss, only a pissed off cyclist. Better yet let them see a skilled, calm, cool, expert Biker. You want respect on the Mean streets,,, Earn it.



    Odd, I just don't have close calls, really I swear.
    I have moments where I'm challenged, when I get real busy on the bike, In traffic..

    Just sayin,,,,
    Excellent words. I have tried to live by them for over 60 years and so far have only been hit once, and it was very minor. As is taught by The League of American Bicyclists: Follow the law, be Predictable, conspicuous, think ahead, ride ready. LCI #3541 .

  7. #32
    Coffee Powered commuter markus_mudd's Avatar
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    I don't know if you get used to this kind of thing but you may have to grit your teeth and try because you said it was a car illegally passing you on a blind hill. Getting into the lane of oncoming traffic in that situation is just silly and that driver is not too bright. I used to live in Eastern Kentucky and there are tons of blind hills/curves. Sometimes people seem to focus on you so much that they just pop into the other lane (to go around) at stupid times. It's almost like they forget other people might be coming towards them. Of course, they would blame you for that issue but it's the driver who entered the other lane in a blind spot so they're completely at fault. Don't worry about "taking the lane" or "hugging the guardrail" because stupid drivers are gonna' do stupid things no matter what you do. It looks like mirrors, good reflexes, and guts will serve you well.

  8. #33
    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    This issue becomes even more poignant to me as spring approaches. I have been considering cycle-commuting as better weather comes around. It is unfortunate that the only way to get where I want to go is down two different heavily traveled interstate routes. If I don't start commuting I won't be able to get any ride time in at all.
    One Foot Less

  9. #34
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
    This issue becomes even more poignant to me as spring approaches. I have been considering cycle-commuting as better weather comes around. It is unfortunate that the only way to get where I want to go is down two different heavily traveled interstate routes. If I don't start commuting I won't be able to get any ride time in at all.
    Can you consider a multi modal commute where you drive somewhere and ride the rest of the way? Maybe drive somewhere that is not along the shortest route, but let's you have a nicer ride?
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  10. #35
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
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    One of my bikes is a trike which I ride in heavy traffic. My experience is that if you ride like what you're doing the vast majority of people will treat you with respect. And then there's a bunch who won't be able to see you even with a flag so you need to be ready for that at all times. Ride like everyone is trying to kill you but don't take it personally, and you'll be fine. I've been doing that for decades.

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