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  1. #1
    Senior Member BikeArkansas's Avatar
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    Do not want to give up

    Last February I was driving my Miata when I had to stop for a red light. The four wheel drive truck behind me stopped, but then took off. He says he has no idea why he did, but that truck slammed my little car. The result has been a very bad whip lash. Steroid injections, were used after exercises etc. did not work. After a recent MRI I am being sent to a surgeon for more testing. My GP told me today that surgery was very possible.

    Enough of that, now to the bike. I am a 65 year old road cyclist. Most of my group rides are at 20 t0 22 MPH. I ride a Scott Addict, which is a very light racing bike. My doctor says those days may be over, with or without surgery. "Have you considered a recumbent?", he asked.

    The simple answer is "No", that is until today.

    If I need to make that change, I have no idea where to even start. I do not want to give up on cycling.
    I started riding my bike to get healthy. Now I try to stay healthy so I can ride my bike.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Notso_fastLane's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear about your accident, that sucks. A friend of a friend was killed a few years ago in similar type of accident (large truck > low, convertible) that all but decapitated the driver.

    There are a lot of bents out there, much more variety than roadbikes. Any recommendations would depend in the type of riding you do (commuting, centuries, racing) and whether you (or your doc) recommends a trike for potential balance issues. I hope you have a lawyer working this case, so you can get a new bent as part of the settlement (or money for it, at least).

    You might check the classified at bentrider and ask over there as well. Lots of knowledgeable folks on that forum.

  3. #3
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear about your accident, that really blows. But on the bright side, your doc has pointed you to some really great machines.

    Warning: a fast bent is like learning to ride all over again. That said, once you get used to one, they're very fast.On some you could do your 20-22 mph paceline speed solo, easily. They are also very comfortable- think contour recliner with headrest..

    for example: M5 Recumbents Models Carbon High Racer

    I have the steel version, which is not as light and average over 23 mph for 40k TT's- and I'm not in the best of shape. By next year I should be pulling over 25 for 40k. I'd be Cat 5 on a road bike.
    Last edited by delcrossv; 07-17-14 at 03:30 PM.
    Lightning P-38 / M5 M-Racer/Ryan Vanguard

  4. #4
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
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    Or maybe a trike.

  5. #5
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    Going to a fast recumbent isn't giving anything up, it's stepping up. Unlike some will say, it's not just 'getting your bent legs;' you also have to get your bent head. That is, you have to learn how to ride it properly and take advantage of a 'bent's unique speed characteristics.

    If you want to climb hills and hurt the big guys, then a carbon highracer is probably where you want to look. The new Schlitter bike is turning heads; mostly because of the performance to price ratio. It may lead to a price drop on the Bacchetta Corsa, which is only aluminum for about the same price. My M5 Carbon Highracer is no slouch; but costs a lot more. Ditto for the Bacchetta Carbon Aero and the Carbent.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
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    As Notso_fastLane mentions there's plenty of variety in the bent world. If you decide to go with two wheelers I would recommend the front-wheel drive Cruzbike.

    recumbent bikes | cruzbike.com

    I personally ride a Cruzbike conversion, which is a regular bike converted into a recumbent by using the conversion kit. This is a slightly cheaper option compared to ready made options available.

    Also, recumbents are fun to ride!

  7. #7
    Senior Member BikeArkansas's Avatar
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    Sounds like some good options.

    Balance may be a problem, or anyway it is rearing its ugly head. Hope to fight it off, for I like to ride two wheels. There is a "freedom" you get on two wheels. However, if it comes to it, a trike would be an option.
    I started riding my bike to get healthy. Now I try to stay healthy so I can ride my bike.

  8. #8
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    Definitely check out Bentrider, if you haven't already. It's a great group of people who will give you lots of (probably conflicting ) advice. Plenty of reviews, there, as well as discussions of various makes and models. As others have said, there is huge variety in the 'bent world -- both two-wheeled and three-wheeled. Much more than in the world of road and mountain bikes. No doubt you will be able to find something that you love. Although most 'bents don't climb as well as DF bikes, some do climb very well, and they are generally faster downhill and on flats. So, once you've adjusted, unless you ride in mountainous terrain, you'll probably see an improvement in performance. I'm sorry to hear of your accident and wish you a speedy recovery. Even if you can still ride your Scott Addict, you might try the world of 'bents, anyway. They are a blast. And so comfortable.
    Steve

  9. #9
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeArkansas View Post
    Sounds like some good options.

    Balance may be a problem, or anyway it is rearing its ugly head. Hope to fight it off, for I like to ride two wheels. There is a "freedom" you get on two wheels. However, if it comes to it, a trike would be an option.
    I ride two wheelers, but I bought my wife a trike. Damn, that thing is fun! Seriously, it's like a bike crossed with a go cart. I've heard they're going to make them illegal in some states because you shouldn't be allowed to have that much fun.

    The advice you're getting here is good: Check out BROL. Lots of good, go fast bikes. I'm also partial to Cruzbikes (the "blow the doors off of the roadies" Vendetta, or the "keepin' up and laughing because my ride is so *#$& comfortable" Silvios are two options that I'd recommend you look at). Lots of good RWD choices, too.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    I ride two wheelers, but I bought my wife a trike. Damn, that thing is fun! Seriously, it's like a bike crossed with a go cart. I've heard they're going to make them illegal in some states because you shouldn't be allowed to have that much fun.

    The advice you're getting here is good: Check out BROL. Lots of good, go fast bikes. I'm also partial to Cruzbikes (the "blow the doors off of the roadies" Vendetta, or the "keepin' up and laughing because my ride is so *#$& comfortable" Silvios are two options that I'd recommend you look at). Lots of good RWD choices, too.
    Additionally, if you like racing/going fast I'd also suggest checking out The Recumbent & HPV Information Center
    Lightning P-38 / M5 M-Racer/Ryan Vanguard

  11. #11
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Time for a road trip.

    There's lots of different recumbent bike and trike designs. They all ride and handle a little differently, and they all come with their own set of storage and transportation issues. I think that trying to evaluate them one-at-a-time is silly. My advice is to make an appointment at a recumbent specialty shop. Tell them what you've told us and evaluate one or more recumbents that appeal to you. There's a lot of details to work through and I think that a recumbent specialty shop is, by far, the quickest, easiest and probably cheapest way to do it.

    Also, as a general rule, I'm going to say that if you were riding 20 to 22 MPH on a DF bike, you'll eventually be able to do that again with a recumbent. It'll probably take a few months to get your muscles trained to the new riding position.
    My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    My advice is to make an appointment at a recumbent specialty shop. Tell them what you've told us and evaluate one or more recumbents that appeal to you. There's a lot of details to work through and I think that a recumbent specialty shop is, by far, the quickest, easiest and probably cheapest way to do it.
    While I agree with this, I'll add the caveat mentioned earlier - there is a learning curve with recumbent bikes. The easiest bike to test ride may not be the best bike for you. The test ride is one part of the evaluation process - but not the only one.

  13. #13
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    While I agree with this, I'll add the caveat mentioned earlier - there is a learning curve with recumbent bikes. The easiest bike to test ride may not be the best bike for you. The test ride is one part of the evaluation process - but not the only one.
    And this is probably more true with the go fast bikes than with bents in general.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  14. #14
    recumbent bike advocate Tractortom's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear about your accident and the stupidity of the fellow in the truck. If 'balance' is an issue, look at a fast trike. I would recommend looking at a Catrike 700. Fully kitted in go-fast gear, you can pull 20-21 on the 700, all the time in a seat like a lawnchair, and at the end of the ride, get up feeling tired, but not 'hurt'. Good luck with the search for the right recumbent, it is a whole different world out there, and there IS a solution for you, if you look for it. Ride LOTS of different recumbents see what fits and what works for you.

    Tractor Tom in Okeechobee, FL

  15. #15
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    You stated you ride in a group of pretty fast guys. If you wish to keep up and still be a good part of the paceline then a higher end high racer will probably work best in this situation. Bacchetta Carbon Aero2, Carbent Raven, Cruzbike Silvio, Metabike, M5 CHR, all would be a good equivalent to your Scott in a paceline.......After you practice and get your bent muscles acclimated.

  16. #16
    Ride more, eat less cat0020's Avatar
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    What exactly are the diagnosis?

    Why the need for surgery?

    Your accident was 18 mo. ago? your body is still getting used to how to function.

    Ever consider seeing a chiropractor?
    Master your environment, and you will survive just fine.
    Chances favor the prepared mind.

  17. #17
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    I've found that my M5 Carbon Highracer is still too low for most of the guys to get a good draft from. Stickbike highracers will be a little taller for them to draft. In that category, a Carbent would be the ultimate; a Bacchetta Corsa would be best bang-for-buck. The new Schlitter bike looks interesting, but it might not be readily available yet.

  18. #18
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
    I've found that my M5 Carbon Highracer is still too low for most of the guys to get a good draft from. Stickbike highracers will be a little taller for them to draft. In that category, a Carbent would be the ultimate; a Bacchetta Corsa would be best bang-for-buck. The new Schlitter bike looks interesting, but it might not be readily available yet.
    "Draft,schmaft- if someone needs a paceline to go fast, they're not fast." ( TT'er's quote)

    Note: on an upright, I'm not fast.
    Lightning P-38 / M5 M-Racer/Ryan Vanguard

  19. #19
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    Here is a good article by a road biker (healthy, young, dedicated road biker, former racer) and his experience trying out recumbents.

    Long Time Road Biker tries Recumbents, by Erik Fetch | Bicycle Technology and Patents

    Here is my experience learning to ride a higher racer.

    My new ride: a Rans F5 High Racer | Bicycle Technology and Patents

    Bottom line: there is a learning curve, but if you want to do it, you can do it. You can go as fast as you like, with comfort.

    Bob

  20. #20
    Ride more, eat less cat0020's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Shaver View Post
    Here is a good article by a road biker (healthy, young, dedicated road biker, former racer) and his experience trying out recumbents.

    Long Time Road Biker tries Recumbents, by Erik Fetch | Bicycle Technology and Patents

    Here is my experience learning to ride a higher racer.

    My new ride: a Rans F5 High Racer | Bicycle Technology and Patents

    Bottom line: there is a learning curve, but if you want to do it, you can do it. You can go as fast as you like, with comfort.

    Bob
    Those are great reads..

    I rode DF bicycles for ages, pedaled across the NA continent on a Huffy 10-speed when I was 16, competed until 2001.

    I started riding recumbent when I first met my GF back in 2006.

    At first, I was just looking for a way to ride with her at slower, more relaxed pace, just something different than the competitive group rides.

    I've since put over 4k miles on my recumbent, but still ride my road bike, MTB, DH, etc.. for long distance pavement riding, the recumbent has replaced all others.
    Master your environment, and you will survive just fine.
    Chances favor the prepared mind.

  21. #21
    Senior Member ncbikers's Avatar
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    While it is good to look around, it may be too early to buy until you find what positions your neck will be comfortable in. I have neck/nerve problems from a car accident and my neck is not happy on most recumbents. Go slow until you find out about your neck. Good luck.

  22. #22
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncbikers View Post
    While it is good to look around, it may be too early to buy until you find what positions your neck will be comfortable in. I have neck/nerve problems from a car accident and my neck is not happy on most recumbents. Go slow until you find out about your neck. Good luck.
    Good point. Most fast recumbents get that way by reclining the rider. That means riding in a chin-down position which depending on the specific neck problem might not work. This is definitely a case of needing test rides before spending a lot of money.

    For blazingly fast on flats and downhills, but not so much on uphills, and upright position, an F-40?
    Last edited by BlazingPedals; 08-14-14 at 01:35 PM.

  23. #23
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Crashed Jan 11,2014 with 57,000 miles on 2 wheels.

    Now have a GTO for safety.

    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  24. #24
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    Sorry to hear of your accident. I hope you mend totally and avoid surgery if at all possible. Wish you the best possible luck.

    The only advice I can offer is a recumbent bicycle is better than a Rascal scooter At least you can still ride!

  25. #25
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post

    For blazingly fast on flats and downhills, but not so much on uphills, and upright position, an F-40?
    That, or a velomobile.
    Lightning P-38 / M5 M-Racer/Ryan Vanguard

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