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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

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Old 05-17-05, 12:01 AM   #26
pdxtex
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i'd estimate 80% of bike repairs require standard tools (wrenches, hex keys, etc...) and the other 20% definitely requires bike specific tools like the bb tool and the chain tool for breaking links...
for me diy = component install and maintenance, lubing, cleaning, etc....the LBS would definitely true wheels, install a cassette/cranks, repack bearings, and install a new chain...just my 2 cents...bikes are pretty easy to work on so to the poster of this thread, its just trial and error. just test out those self installed brakes before you go bombing some big hills...

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Old 05-17-05, 12:03 AM   #27
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I join the masses - do most maintainance myself, but headset & wheel truing stuff for the moment are LBS jobs. I have recently claimed back BB by getting the tools, these seem to be the most troublesome/expensive ongoing items. My wife doesn't fully trust me with her rig despite it being completely rebuilt with carbon forks added, components/wheels upgraded. She "likes the way the bike feels" when she gets it back from the LBS + the mech has the hots for her - grrr. Now I've rebuilt both our roadies, my MTB commuter is in the firing line. 9spd drivetrain upgrade & mavic wheels/disks etc.
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Old 05-17-05, 01:03 AM   #28
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I do most things myself, but a regular check (e.g. once a year) will reveal problems which you didn't know about, and is important to get expert checkup.
I was wondering about a creak for a month before I dared ask the bike shop, and he soon convinced me that "the tighter the better" policy I was using on my bolts, was not neccessarily correct. I had an overtightened aheadset, crushing the ball bearings. No lasting damage thankfully.
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Old 05-17-05, 06:12 AM   #29
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Personally, I wouldn't take my bikes near a LBS for repair....for a number of reasons. For me part of the fun of bikes is working on them and trying different part combinations. Even though I do perform modest wheel truing...believe an expert wheel builder in your area is a great find as those with this expertise will typically be better at it than any home mechanic.
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Old 05-17-05, 07:34 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biker7
..believe an expert wheel builder in your area is a great find as those with this expertise will typically be better at it than any home mechanic.
George
there is nothing magical about head sets, forks and wheel truing. Head set and fork installation is easy peasy.

An expert may do a better job on wheel truing but but IMO the time and regular attention that you can give your own bike outweighs the skill factor.
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Old 05-17-05, 08:46 AM   #31
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My Trek 2100 is 13 years old and I haven't touched the BB yet. I adjusted the headset once. Hubs are untocuhed. Everything turn quietly and smoothly, so there's ne need to mess with things. I do as much work on my bikes as I can by myself. A few tool and a repair book covers most things. Knowing about my bike and working on it is another source of pleasure I can get from the sport of bicycling: Zen and the art of bicycle maintenance.
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Old 05-17-05, 08:56 AM   #32
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Years ago I was taking my bike in, but I started riding so much it wasn't practical in season so I learned myself. About all I haven't done is replace a headset/fork. I had some trouble with the original wheels on the bike, so I ended up rebuilding them, as well as building myself a 2nd set. It's worked out great. It's nice and comforting to be able to keep your own machine running smoothly. It should be noted I am not mechanically inclined at all. If fact the bike is about the only thing I will work on mechanically, so it can't be that hard.

It arose more out of necessity but there is a certain satisfaction in doing it, plus you can always get instant turnaround on a fix vs having to take it to a shop, and in season sometimes waiting a few days to get it back. Not so good if you like to ride a lot.
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Old 03-14-14, 07:38 PM   #33
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My maintenance schedule depends on the miles and weather. I ride year long, also during Michigan winter /a lot of salt/

- I lube chain, moving derailer parts and SPD pedals every few rides or 100-200 miles /I don't ride in mud/
- every month I take chain off and soak it in gasoline for few minutes, and then lube again.
- Around twice a year headset overhaul, bottom bracket cleaning and greasing, hub overhaul/repacking.
- Once or twice a year new housings and cables /buying in bulk so it's very inexpensive/

Of course stuff like replacing brake pads, shoes, tires and tubes are on as needed basis.
I also wipe down all exposed cables /the ones not in housing/ with a rag soaked in WD40 or wax based cleaner /whatever is closer to my hand lol /
I don't mind if my bike get dirty during the ride, but I hate to park it that way....so, washing it after each salty or at least wiping it down after wet ride.

I'm doing this to all my family bikes. It wouldn't be worth to keep paying for that service at my LBS.
If you a handy person - buy your bike specific tools and start doing it yourself. Very rewarding and most things are pretty easy. Youtube, blogs or Bike Forum is a great place to learn everything. Your local bike store have hands on maintenance classes and home mechanic classes, which in most cases are well worth the small investment. I still have a list of things I want/need to have, so not done yet.../don't tell my wife/

All the tools I bought /not at once - it was on as needed basis/ cost me around the same as 1 average comprehensive tune-up cost /smart shopping - mostly online sales and less known brands/.
As a true diy-er, I also used bike hanger as my "stand". Lowes/Homedepot I believe. Since it's installed on the very edge of the hanging shelve - I have a very easy access from all sides. I also put a magnetic strip just above it to keep all needed tools handy and in sight.

Also bunch of rags and always using latex gloves. When you done with your bike your hands will be clean and not smelly. I also use my small air compressor a lot. Many folks are against it, but for quick pumping the tires - you can set max psi, installing/removing grips or for blasting water from components after washing the bike - it's just an awesome tool.

Here is some pics of most of my bike related home/diy shop...Not much, but it is all I need for each and every of my bikes.


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Old 03-14-14, 07:55 PM   #34
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I build my own wheels...

Do you think anyone touches the rest of my bike besides me? Nope! My tools have paid for themselves about 4x over now...

I jumped into it all when I wanted to upgrade my cheaper mountain bike with a full LX group and better wheels. I've never looked back!
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Old 03-14-14, 07:57 PM   #35
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After 9 years it's ok to start a new thread. Srsly.
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Old 03-14-14, 08:09 PM   #36
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I do most of my own building and maintenance. Can't say I ever built a wheel though. In fact, I'll admit I suck at even truing wheels. But I can tune derailleurs to perfection in a heartbeat
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Old 03-14-14, 08:33 PM   #37
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I leave enough to do so I can stop by my LBS and shoot the **** for half an hour while they work on it.
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Old 03-14-14, 08:33 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackb View Post
My Trek 2100 is 13 years old and I haven't touched the BB yet. I adjusted the headset once. Hubs are untocuhed. Everything turn quietly and smoothly, so there's ne need to mess with things. I do as much work on my bikes as I can by myself. A few tool and a repair book covers most things. Knowing about my bike and working on it is another source of pleasure I can get from the sport of bicycling: Zen and the art of bicycle maintenance.
I hope that jack is putting a few more miles on that bike now.
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Old 03-14-14, 08:53 PM   #39
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cost of repair = cost of tool to do the job or close enough.

or worse, spoke tool = $5, get a wheel trued at the shop = $ ouch !!

get your own tools, you'll save money in the long run.
I do the basics - lube, clean, install basic parts, adjust brakes, but anything to do with the drivetrain I generally leave to the LBS. Investing in tools would undoubtedly save me some money, but my time is even more valuable. I barely have time to ride enough as it is.
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Old 03-14-14, 10:11 PM   #40
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I live 50 miles from the nearest bike shop and I have always done my own wrenching on everything I have ever owned. It a logical conclusion that I do all my bike repairs and maintenance.
I have done everything (replaced, repaired or tuned) except build a wheel and that's next on my to do list.
If you are handy with a tool and you like collecting tools as I do you can do most if not all of your maintenance. With resources like Bike Forums, Sheldon Brown, YouTube, Park Tool blog and more you have a wealth of tutorial information at your finger tips.
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Old 03-14-14, 10:31 PM   #41
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I do most everything including minor wheel truing. Not sure yet if I'm going to tackle an Ergo 9spd brifter & its rear D overhaul. I could probably do it though. Someday I'll take a wheel building course and frame building course. Frame painting & brazing work (water bottle & canti bosses) were farmed out.
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Old 03-14-14, 11:35 PM   #42
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After 9 years it's ok to start a new thread. Srsly.
I don't always reply to threads, but when I do, they're nine years old. lol.

Keeping on subject, fix it myself. Thats half the fun.
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Old 03-15-14, 09:51 AM   #43
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Do it myself, the whole way. I wont do framebuilding or lacing wheels.

Maintenance is straightforward, most of which deals with inspections after a ride. My main focus is bearing sets and drivetrain along with a constant topping off of tire psi.
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Old 03-15-14, 10:29 AM   #44
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I don't always reply to threads, but when I do, they're nine years old. lol.
You are the most interesting cyclist in the world!
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Old 03-15-14, 05:14 PM   #45
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You are the most interesting cyclist in the world!
Ha, I had to throw that out there. I'm far from interesting though. I'm sure others have me beat with that title.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:44 PM   #46
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I do everything except face bottom bracket shells and head tubes. Since that is only done once on a frame I don't buy the tools. When I do not have the right tool to do a repair or installation, that is when I buy it. Unfortunately that also means I have many obsolete tools like freewheel removers and crank pullers. So other than some work on the frame when purchased, nobody except myself has worked on my bikes for the last 35 years. Since I have never spent a dime for labor in a bike shop I probably have saved money. More importantly, in more than 50,000 miles on the road, I have never had a breakdown, only flats. Once a cassette lock ring came loose but I still go home after tightening it with a stick and once I broke a pedal cleat.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:55 PM   #47
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I don't have a lot of cash but I have even less time, so I do almost all of it myself. I had the LBS press-in my BB30/English adapter, and I do the rest. The only real maintenance I do is to lube all bearings twice per year, the rest is easy enough that anyone can do it. I have a friend to help true wheels. I also have a higher attention to detail because it's the only bicycle I have to service all day.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:58 PM   #48
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I am my own LBS, framebuilder, and wheel builder.
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Old 03-17-14, 12:07 PM   #49
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I usually just use the LBS for parts and questions. I try to do as much as I can at home, but I still don't have all the necessary tools. I still want to learn more about working with headsets and bottom brackets. The shop usually trues my wheels, I'd love to find a decent truing stand and derailleur hanger alignment gauge for a good price though.
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Old 03-17-14, 02:16 PM   #50
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Honestly, both. I DIY the heck out of my bike, then I take it to the shop so they can fix it.
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