Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 97
  1. #1
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    The Great Italian Road Bike Question

    Last spring, I spent some time cycling in Italy. Surrounded by Pinarellos, Colnagos, DeRosas, etc., it occurred to me that "I just gotta get an Italian road bike." But there was really very little thought behind that decision. It was more about the lore, the look, the legend--the emotion--of Italian cycling.

    Having checked out a bunch of Italian bike websites, I commonly read phrases like "classic italian ride."

    But the truth is I have no idea what such a phrase means. Does it mean anything? Is it all (or partly) marketing smoke and mirrors? I asked a guy at a bike shop about the ride quality of Italian bikes, and he just kind of got quietly misty eyed, like he was thinking of his first high school girl friend.

    So the question (ok, three questions) is, aside from history and bling, what makes Italian bikes special? Is there such a thing as a "classic Italian ride?" (I can hear the jokes about Sophia Loren already) Am I right to be concerned about the two-year frame warranty that most Italian frame companies seem to offer?
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    SW Florida
    My Bikes
    Sampson TI, Giant CFR-1
    Posts
    191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    Last spring, I spent some time cycling in Italy. Surrounded by Pinarellos, Colnagos, DeRosas, etc., it occurred to me that "I just gotta get an Italian road bike." But there was really very little thought behind that decision. It was more about the lore, the look, the legend--the emotion--of Italian cycling.

    Having checked out a bunch of Italian bike websites, I commonly read phrases like "classic italian ride."

    But the truth is I have no idea what such a phrase means. Does it mean anything? Is it all (or partly) marketing smoke and mirrors? I asked a guy at a bike shop about the ride quality of Italian bikes, and he just kind of got quietly misty eyed, like he was thinking of his first high school girl friend.

    So the question (ok, three questions) is, aside from history and bling, what makes Italian bikes special? Is there such a thing as a "classic Italian ride?" (I can hear the jokes about Sophia Loren already) Am I right to be concerned about the two-year frame warranty that most Italian frame companies seem to offer?
    Answers:

    Question #1 They have names like "Bolla Chilli" that sound a lot sexier than "Trek" or "Giant".

    Question #2 Some tended to put hand carved lugs on their frames, they included "art" into their bikes. You would be hard pressed to convince a Frog that any "Itey" bike was better than a classic Peugot.

    Question #3 What kind of warranty are you willing to live with, I've always thought most were one year. If you ride 6000 to 10,000 miles per year and the frame lasts that long, I'll bet it will go a LOT longer.

    You will find little difference in any high quality frames today....get what YOU like, are comfortable on and like!

  3. #3
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry

    Having checked out a bunch of Italian bike websites, I commonly read phrases like "classic italian ride."

    But the truth is I have no idea what such a phrase means. Does it mean anything? Is it all (or partly) marketing smoke and mirrors? I asked a guy at a bike shop about the ride quality of Italian bikes, and he just kind of got quietly misty eyed, like he was thinking of his first high school girl friend.

    So the question (ok, three questions) is, aside from history and bling, what makes Italian bikes special? Is there such a thing as a "classic Italian ride?" (I can hear the jokes about Sophia Loren already) Am I right to be concerned about the two-year frame warranty that most Italian frame companies seem to offer?
    It's marketing and BS. No warranty issues on any of mine and all but one were bought used.YMMV

  4. #4
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RhumbRunner
    Answers:

    Question #1 They have names like "Bolla Chilli" that sound a lot sexier than "Trek" or "Giant".
    !
    Thanks for the heads up. I didn't know beans about Bolla Chilli, but I asked around and found out that they're not carbon fiber, but they are high in dietary fiber.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  5. #5
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    It's marketing and BS. No warranty issues on any of mine and all but one were bought used.YMMV
    What are you riding? and what does YMMV mean?
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  6. #6
    Passionate or O-C? desmobob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    upstate NY; L. George region
    My Bikes
    2005 Bianchi Axis, Motobecane Le Champion SL
    Posts
    218
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    So the question (ok, three questions) is, aside from history and bling, what makes Italian bikes special? Is there such a thing as a "classic Italian ride?" (I can hear the jokes about Sophia Loren already) Am I right to be concerned about the two-year frame warranty that most Italian frame companies seem to offer?
    1) I think it's the combination of form and function designed with pure passion. Italian cars and motorcycles have that same special whatever-it-is.

    2) Good question.... Though it's probably the least exotic, I believe Bianchi is the oldest Italian brand. Does that make it the "classic" ride? More of a "Fiat" as opposed to the Pinarello and Colnago "Ferraris" and "Lamborghinis"?

    3) It wouldn't worry me too much.

    Ciao,
    desmobob

  7. #7
    King of the Forest Totoro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    772
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A Honda is probably better built than a Ferarri, but some people still go for the Ferrari. And some Chilean and California wines taste better than Bordeaux, but folks still go for the French. It's not just marketing, it has cultural meaning that goes beyond form or function.

    BTW: I just ordered my first Italian bike. Have to justify it somehow.

  8. #8
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    7,460
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    pegoretti



    (from competitivecyclist.com)

    Why rumor, not fact? After all, Ford makes no bones about the fact that its Formula One race car engines are manufactured by Cosworth. Rumor has it that the name appearing on many a pro bike is not necessarily that of the artisan who built the frame. In a few cases, this is self-evident: the carbon-fiber lugs and tubes of a Colnago C-40 may have been designed by Ernesto himself, but he outsources the tube production and bonding processes to companies primarily involved with aerospace and automotive manufacturing. Equally clear is the fact that any company attempting to cater at the same time to paying customers and a professional road team must employ numerous builders. Yet there is something strange about high-end bike business, a belief amongst many that only cheap frames are made outside of the parent factory.

    Naturally enough, the craftsmen supposedly at the origin of the rumors are of the highest caliber. Alberto Masi was legendary for building frames for the stars (Roche, Lemond, Chiappuci to name a few) that bore other builder's names. Masi spilled the beans and was therefore widely associated with the practice. In general, though, the frame-building elite prefer to keep very quiet about these kinds of arrangements for commercial reasons.

    Dario Pegoretti has long been a formidable behind-the-scenes presence. He acquired his knowledge and expertise from legendary Gino Milani. Milani was never famous to the cycling world at large, but he was one of the most brilliant framebuilders of the 1970's. His work was a major influence on every high-end framebuilder of the time. Since 1987 Pegoretti has honored the Milani legacy by going beyond the limitations of standard tubing to build unique, world-class frames. Pegoretti is synonymous with innovation. He was the first in Italy to use TIG-welding techniques. For over a decade he's worked side-by-side with Dedacciai to design and develop new tubesets. The DynaLite and Radius tubing so popular with Italian framebuilders throughout the late 90's are direct products of Pegoretti.

    From 1991 to 1997, Pegoretti built frames exclusively for pro road teams. Everyone wants to know who, when, where, and how, but unfortunately a lot more folks don't want you to know. But we'll put it like this -- think of any major rider of the 1990's and you can more or less guess that they rode Pegoretti frames decaled otherwise. Name a major bike race, and it's been won on a Pegoretti. Since 1997 Pegoretti has designed and created frames carrying their own name. In 1999 they moved to Levico Terme, a beautiful resort in the Dolomites. It has several times been home to mountaintop finishes in the Giro d'Italia. Since they've moved to Levico, they've redesigned their frames, working on the assumption that an all-round tube profile offers the best compromise between lateral strength and torsional stiffness. It is a deliberate choice made to exploit the benefits of oversized frame tubing. It's not an overstatement to claim that no other Italian framebuilder has been so instrumental in bringing about the wide use of aluminum in road frames, and that none other had more input into the design and fabrication of the tubing itself.

    Given that Pegoretti has had a long association with the Italian tubing manufacturer Dedacciai -- in fact, throughout the 90's Dedacciai entrusted Pegoretti with the job of building prototype frames from their new tubesets to provide them with detailed feedback about their buildability -- it took many by surprise going into 2005 that Dario began building his steel frames exclusively out of Columbus Niobium Spirit tubing. Why Columbus for steel? Because as Dedacciai pushes the alchemistic envelope with the most modern alloys out there -- Scandium, Magnesium, and Aluminum -- Columbus (like Pegoretti, and like many of our customers) still believes in the viability of steel as a race-quality frame material. They're just as committed to refining the quality of steel as Dedacciai is to non-ferrous alloys.

    In fact, all of the Niobium tubing Pegoretti uses is one-off. He insists that Columbus take the extra step to heat treat the tubes for him. While the stock version of the tubes has very good elongation qualities and thereby provides a nice bit of shock damping, heat treating them gives them a considerable increase in responsiveness under a load. Think of it this way: While a spring is springy by nature, a heat treated spring rebounds from compression far more quickly. In other words, a heat treated Niobium Spirit frameset will provide superior elasticity, making a Pegoretti feel like it's gliding on a lousy road surface to an extent unmatched by other tubesets.

    One aside about Pegoretti sizing: Pegoretti frames 58cm and larger have dropped top tubes. 57cm and smaller frames are measured as center to center, but on the larger frames Dario drops the top tubes and extends both the seat and head tubes to compensate. The amount of drop varies with frame size, as do the extensions on the seat and head tubes, but ultimately this allows him to build larger frames both lighter and stiffer without compromising positioning on the bike.



    Last edited by Serpico; 09-01-05 at 08:54 PM.

  9. #9
    Aluminium Crusader :-)
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    9,873
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    eh, go for it. I would if I could afford one

    these days, "classic" usually means steel with a non-sloping top tube, possibly lugs, and possibly a 1" head tube.....like this one (just ignore the carbon rear )

    oooh baby

    Last edited by 531Aussie; 09-02-05 at 05:48 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ziggurat
    pegoretti



    (from competitivecyclist.com)

    Why rumor, not fact? After all, Ford makes no bones about the fact that its Formula One race car engines are manufactured by Cosworth. Rumor has it that the name appearing on many a pro bike is not necessarily that of the artisan who built the frame. In a few cases, this is self-evident: the carbon-fiber lugs and tubes of a Colnago C-40 may have been designed by Ernesto himself, but he outsources the tube production and bonding processes to companies primarily involved with aerospace and automotive manufacturing. Equally clear is the fact that any company attempting to cater at the same time to paying customers and a professional road team must employ numerous builders. Yet there is something strange about high-end bike business, a belief amongst many that only cheap frames are made outside of the parent factory.

    Naturally enough, the craftsmen supposedly at the origin of the rumors are of the highest caliber. Alberto Masi was legendary for building frames for the stars (Roche, Lemond, Chiappuci to name a few) that bore other builder's names. Masi spilled the beans and was therefore widely associated with the practice. In general, though, the frame-building elite prefer to keep very quiet about these kinds of arrangements for commercial reasons.

    Dario Pegoretti has long been a formidable behind-the-scenes presence. He acquired his knowledge and expertise from legendary Gino Milani. Milani was never famous to the cycling world at large, but he was one of the most brilliant framebuilders of the 1970's. His work was a major influence on every high-end framebuilder of the time. Since 1987 Pegoretti has honored the Milani legacy by going beyond the limitations of standard tubing to build unique, world-class frames. Pegoretti is synonymous with innovation. He was the first in Italy to use TIG-welding techniques. For over a decade he's worked side-by-side with Dedacciai to design and develop new tubesets. The DynaLite and Radius tubing so popular with Italian framebuilders throughout the late 90's are direct products of Pegoretti.

    From 1991 to 1997, Pegoretti built frames exclusively for pro road teams. Everyone wants to know who, when, where, and how, but unfortunately a lot more folks don't want you to know. But we'll put it like this -- think of any major rider of the 1990's and you can more or less guess that they rode Pegoretti frames decaled otherwise. Name a major bike race, and it's been won on a Pegoretti. Since 1997 Pegoretti has designed and created frames carrying their own name. In 1999 they moved to Levico Terme, a beautiful resort in the Dolomites. It has several times been home to mountaintop finishes in the Giro d'Italia. Since they've moved to Levico, they've redesigned their frames, working on the assumption that an all-round tube profile offers the best compromise between lateral strength and torsional stiffness. It is a deliberate choice made to exploit the benefits of oversized frame tubing. It's not an overstatement to claim that no other Italian framebuilder has been so instrumental in bringing about the wide use of aluminum in road frames, and that none other had more input into the design and fabrication of the tubing itself.

    Given that Pegoretti has had a long association with the Italian tubing manufacturer Dedacciai -- in fact, throughout the 90's Dedacciai entrusted Pegoretti with the job of building prototype frames from their new tubesets to provide them with detailed feedback about their buildability -- it took many by surprise going into 2005 that Dario began building his steel frames exclusively out of Columbus Niobium Spirit tubing. Why Columbus for steel? Because as Dedacciai pushes the alchemistic envelope with the most modern alloys out there -- Scandium, Magnesium, and Aluminum -- Columbus (like Pegoretti, and like many of our customers) still believes in the viability of steel as a race-quality frame material. They're just as committed to refining the quality of steel as Dedacciai is to non-ferrous alloys.

    In fact, all of the Niobium tubing Pegoretti uses is one-off. He insists that Columbus take the extra step to heat treat the tubes for him. While the stock version of the tubes has very good elongation qualities and thereby provides a nice bit of shock damping, heat treating them gives them a considerable increase in responsiveness under a load. Think of it this way: While a spring is springy by nature, a heat treated spring rebounds from compression far more quickly. In other words, a heat treated Niobium Spirit frameset will provide superior elasticity, making a Pegoretti feel like it's gliding on a lousy road surface to an extent unmatched by other tubesets.

    One aside about Pegoretti sizing: Pegoretti frames 58cm and larger have dropped top tubes. 57cm and smaller frames are measured as center to center, but on the larger frames Dario drops the top tubes and extends both the seat and head tubes to compensate. The amount of drop varies with frame size, as do the extensions on the seat and head tubes, but ultimately this allows him to build larger frames both lighter and stiffer without compromising positioning on the bike.
    That's what they call hype, BS and marketing...Right?

  11. #11
    Aluminium Crusader :-)
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    9,873
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    you forgot "hooey"?

  12. #12
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    7,460
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yup, just a bunch of 'barnyard waste' written by some drama queen

    bleh--you guys are no fun
    Last edited by Serpico; 09-01-05 at 09:08 PM.

  13. #13
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 531Aussie
    eh, go for it. I would if I could afford one

    these days, "classic" often means steel, with a non-sloping top tube, possibly lugs, and possibly a 1" head tube.....like this one (just ignore the carbon rear )

    oooh baby

    I wish you hadn't shown me this. Same goes for you Zigg. I can see a second job in my future--if the economy doesn't completely go to hell in a rowboat first. (Maybe there won't even be a rowboat to go to hell in....).
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  14. #14
    By-Tor...or the Snow Dog? hi565's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Ma
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Cross Concept, Flyte Srs-3
    Posts
    6,481
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Its the celeste. Also get a cycle sport america, there is an ad for a sweeeeeeeet looking italian bike. Very very nice looking.
    ----------------------------------------------------------

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, Wa
    My Bikes
    SyCip/Campy
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  16. #16
    Spin man spin
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    My Bikes
    1999 Carrera Casseopia, 2005 Salsa Campeon
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've had two Italian bikes and two non-Italian bikes. From my experience, Italian bikes have a slightly more responsive (twitchy?) geometry than others like Orbea or Merckx. It's the only difference that I can tell.

  17. #17
    Feed me your soul! Jakey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Salem, OR
    My Bikes
    Torelli 20th Anniversary, Trek 2000, Kona NuNu
    Posts
    3,019
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jsliderc

    Having a Torelli (built by Mondonico) and building up another one, I can say that the ride is one of orgasmic proportions. Every time I ride the thing, I just get happier with it. Mondonico is another 'framebuilder of trust' like Masi was described in that article above...his frames have won the Giro, and have been on the podium of the tour. (Chiapucchi's Carrera frames were actually built by Mondonico)
    10lbs of evil in a 5lb bag

    Torelli Gran Sasso
    Torelli 20th Anniversary
    Torelli Carbon / Ultrafoco
    GT Karakoram (commuter)

  18. #18
    Guest
    Guest
    I got my bike in Italy. I'm not concerned about the warranty... they're FOR LIFE. I watched customers bring in their old DeRosas for servicing, and they got treated like they were old friends, and the bikes were handled like babies. I also met folks who drove in from other countries with their DeRosas for maintenance, and the DeRosa family knew every customer that walked in with one of their bikes. Would I get that same service from Trek? Somehow, I don't think so.

    Koffee

  19. #19
    Gitchur SUV Away From Me
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Carmichael, California
    Posts
    209
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have to echo what Jakey said. I have an old Torelli, a Corsa Strada from the late '80's. The thing just loves to be thrown into corners. It is very responsive, an absolute blast to ride. There's just a certain feel to the bike that is hard to describe -- it's just fun.

    Do all Italian bikes have this sporty characteristic? I don't know, but I have to believe that decades of framebuilding experience by Italian masters have to mean something.

  20. #20
    Hamburger Pimp
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hell of the North
    My Bikes
    BMC SLT O1 Team Full Record, Kuips SuperNova Ultegra & DuraAce, Rocky Mountain Team Scandium full XTR w sids & dope parts, Guerciotti Khaybar Full Record.
    Posts
    576
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    FWIW I have a Merckx, a LeMond, and a Pinarello. The Pinarello is head and shoulders above those two. (Although the Merckx is 80's Lugged steel) BTW I just hit 3000kms on the Pinarello, I only got it in May. I also hit 80kph on it last week. SWEEEET!

  21. #21
    Aluminium Crusader :-)
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    9,873
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Trev Doyle
    FWIW I have a Merckx, a LeMond, and a Pinarello. The Pinarello is head and shoulders above those two. (Although the Merckx is 80's Lugged steel) BTW I just hit 3000kms on the Pinarello, I only got it in May. I also hit 80kph on it last week. SWEEEET!
    I've forgotten....what type of Pinarello do you have?

    EDIT

    found it....

    Another "check out my new bike" thread
    how does it whoop the other bikes?
    Last edited by 531Aussie; 09-02-05 at 05:50 AM.

  22. #22
    OM boy cyclezen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Goleta CA
    My Bikes
    a bunch
    Posts
    3,011
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    Last spring, I spent some time cycling in Italy. Surrounded by Pinarellos, Colnagos, DeRosas, etc., it occurred to me that "I just gotta get an Italian road bike." But there was really very little thought behind that decision. It was more about the lore, the look, the legend--the emotion--of Italian cycling.
    ...
    But the truth is I have no idea what such a phrase means. Does it mean anything? Is it all (or partly) marketing smoke and mirrors? I asked a guy at a bike shop about the ride quality of Italian bikes, and he just kind of got quietly misty eyed, like he was thinking of his first high school girl friend.

    So the question (ok, three questions) is, aside from history and bling, what makes Italian bikes special? Is there such a thing as a "classic Italian ride?"
    Shame you couldn't/didn't get a chance to ride one while there.
    as Sydney noted "hype and BS"... maybe...
    I can't speak at all to the 'modern' machines. And to some extent what it takes to build 'carbon' and 'mixed media' frames may be (prolly is...) beyond the capabilites of the small shop 'custom' builder.
    But then there is a real question whether the stuff that LA and other higher level racers is fully applicable to the 'life-sport' rider. Occasionally I question whether my '78 Colnago will go the distance - then I go for a ride. Somehow I don't think many of today's higher tech frames will last as long as it, much less make it through a few decades of hard use.
    Durablity aside, some may say, "I'll just buy a new one, what about performance?" Well, ride quality seems a question as well as the ability to provide 'high performance' and in that case 'it' feels as though it can still meet the mark.
    Worn out parts/components can degrade any machine, mishaps can take their toll; but keep it rejuvenated, then it'll do as well as anything.
    The classic Italian builders of steel may not have some guarded secret, they just have had the ability to build bikes that CLEARLY are a step beyond most in that hard-to-quantify thing of "Ride Quality". Not all steel has it, but we're lucky to have more than enough, and its not only Italian. A Marinoni, a Serotta, an Eisentraut, a Sachs and many other artisan builders can also equal or exceed the Italians.
    A short year ago I had started to 'save' for a new-tech machine, along the way I rejuvenated my own 'motor' and found again why I had these 30 year old bikes - they were and still are tremendous machines, up to any task I can give them. So I spent a lot of my designated 'bike' money for rejuvenation and new parts. Glad I did, best money I've spent in quite some time.
    Defined Italian steel (and all the custom guyz from the same school) - not just classic, not just nostalgia - it is the benchmark... still...

  23. #23
    Senior Member (Retired) gmason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Great North Woods
    My Bikes
    Vittorio, Centaur triple; Casati Laser Piu, Chorus Triple.
    Posts
    2,671
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    ... what does YMMV mean?
    Your mileage may vary.

    And BTW, to all: you can edit the quote included in your post to save space should you be so inclined.

  24. #24
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesV
    I have to echo what Jakey said. I have an old Torelli, a Corsa Strada from the late '80's. The thing just loves to be thrown into corners. It is very responsive, an absolute blast to ride. There's just a certain feel to the bike that is hard to describe -- it's just fun.

    Do all Italian bikes have this sporty characteristic? I don't know, but I have to believe that decades of framebuilding experience by Italian masters have to mean something.
    My stable was full of Italian thoroughbreds,and old sydney bought alot of this hype. Just for grins sprung for a Serotta CSi for comparison purposes and it beats them all. But maybe Ben soaks his in premium garlic and olive oil. FWIW, my made in the USA Masis tun my cranks better than the Italian made one......The Italians have made their share of low to bottom of the barrel junk.

  25. #25
    Announcer EventServices's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    In the drops.
    My Bikes
    Too many and not enough
    Posts
    4,994
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Ciocc cornered like a Ducati.
    My Trek cornered like a John Deere.

    My Guerciotti sounded cool.
    My Trek sounded bland.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •