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  1. #1
    Member lance's Avatar
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    Alloy Seatpsot vs. Carbon Fiber Seatpost - More Comfort??

    I just bought a new road bike and I was thinking of swaping of the American Classic Alloy Seatpost for a Easton Carbon Fiber Seatpost.
    My question is...Will the Carbon Fiber Seatpost make a difference in comfort? Will I even notice a difference?
    Thanks in advance.
    Lance
    p.s. - Does American Classic make a good seatpost? I never heard of them. (newbie)

  2. #2
    usnagent007
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    If you give me a week, I'll be able to tell you from my own experience. I am building a bike with an american classic post,
    and am currently using an EC70 carbon post.

    American Classic posts are very good: great cost to function/weight ratio.
    Last edited by usnagent007; 09-15-02 at 10:50 PM.

  3. #3
    usnagent007
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    also: what material is your road bike?

  4. #4
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    No, unless you are running a compact frame with ALOT of seatpost showing and then it will still be very slight to not at all.Hang onto your money and put it inot something of real value.But not Enron stock either.

  5. #5
    suitcase of courage VegasCyclist's Avatar
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    Originally posted by lance
    My question is...Will the Carbon Fiber Seatpost make a difference in comfort? Will I even notice a difference?...

    Does American Classic make a good seatpost? I never heard of them.
    well the difference will be much in the same way it feels with AL as opposed to Carbon fiber forks. most people agree that AL lets all the vibrations of the road go right though the bike into the rider, and with carbon fiber this is slighly less. (also a weight saving issue here) personally I think there will be a slight difference in the feel between the AL seatpost and the Carbon fiber, and most of the hype is in the weight saving.

    I have not heard of American classic either, but since you are a new rider I would not worry about it, get used to the bike and riding before you think about upgrading any parts. Another good idea is to go to the bike shop and see if they will let you test ride a bike with an carbon seat post. you will know for sure then
    happy riding
    -VegasCyclist
    "Daddy made whiskey and he made it well.... cost two dollars and it burned like hell...."
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  6. #6
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Unless you are a sponsored racer, I see no significant benefit to a carbon fiber seat post. Put your money where it counts, particularly the wheelset, tyres, etc.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  7. #7
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    FWIW, I could tell no difference between a DuraAce post and an Alien Carbon post. (Both attached to the same Alliante saddle)

    This is on a Ti frame with ~5" of post exposed.

    Buy the carbon post 'cause you think it's cool looking, or you're crazy about every gram, but not because you're looking for a smoother ride.

  8. #8
    Member Ferg's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Cat2
    Buy the carbon post 'cause you think it's cool looking, or you're crazy about every gram...
    Best damn advice I've ever heard If you have the cash, you might as well spend it on something light and good looking; carbon fiber seat post, college girl, whatever.

  9. #9
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    I have the older CT2 seatposts on both my MTB and RB. They look cool and they're light but I wouldn't put too much stock in ride difference unless you've got a lot of it showing out of the seat tube. Yes, the CF probably does transmit less road vibes to the saddle but your saddle does a lot to hide that from your butt than anything else. If you're really looking to smooth out the ride of your current bike then start looking at wheels, fork, stem, handlebars and for your bum... the saddle itself. Get one with some flexy rails and a compliant shell (note that I said shell and not foam). I don't think the Easton posts are that much more expensive than a good quality Al post if you hunt around for a good deal. A couple of things to note about them.

    - CT2 had the couble-bolt setup on the sides of the head clamp. There's a pair of bolt and nuts (one for each rail). You'll need about 4 hands to adjust the saddle. They held great once set up and allowed for infinite fine tuning but if you like to change things a lot you'll hate the head clamp. I've also stripped the bolts twice on one of my posts and had to replace the bolts. That said, I think the EC70 has a new head clamp design so this may not be an issue.

    - Be very careful with overtightening your seatpost clamp or anything that clamps to your seatpost. Be very careful about scratching the post... no more putting a scrawl mark to remember your seatpost height (use a piece of electrical tape). Any of these things may cause structural failure. This is common to all CF posts.

  10. #10
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    I ride an alloy seatpost and a USE Alien carbon seatpost. I haven't noticed much difference in comfort, but both bikes are carbon. If you ride aluminum you could see a difference and maybe even steel. Also anytime you can knock off some weight do it. I'm not sure how long the carbon posts will last. Change your fork to a carbon fork for comfort if you ride aluminum.

  11. #11
    Great guy poululla's Avatar
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    Carbon seatposts have their place in the world. I ride a Giant TCR ZERO, with a compact allu frame. This is a stiff frame, I repeat, stiff. To save money on the original purchase price of the bike, I opted for a alloy seatpost. Mistake. I rattled so much due to the unbending nature of the alloy post, I almost changed bikes. I borrowed a MDT carbon post from my LBS, and have since bought it. Why? The flex-factor so common to many carcon products counteracts the vibrations from the stiff frame, turning my bumpy ride into a smooth one. Oh yeh, I forgot, it looks bloody cool too!!!

  12. #12
    usnagent007
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    If you give me a week...
    FWIW:

    Trek 2200 alpha aluminum, 50cm, 27.2mm post diameter with approx 7cm exposed, tried it with:
    ~an ICON aluminum with a ti-railed Selle Italia Flite Gel
    ~a USE Alien carbon (with same saddle)
    ~an Easton EC70 carbon (it has 40mm of setback, the Alien does not) with a ti-railed San Marco Era
    -->carbon post was a noticeable comfort upgrade here (as was the additional setback, and the Era saddle for me)


    Profile Air-Raid carbon, 52cm, 26.8mm post diameter with approx 6cm exposed, tried it with:
    ~an American Classic aluminum (2-piece, 2-bolt design) with a ti-railed San Marco Era
    --> rides smoother than the Trek. I cannot imagine a carbon post being a significant comfort benefit here.

    Specialized Allez aluminum, 54cm, 27.2mm post diameter with approx 5cm exposed. A friends bike, he'll let me try it soon. He is using:
    ~American Classic aluminum (2-piece, 2-bolt design) with a ti-railed San Marco Era
    -->The similarity of our configurations makes this an experiment worth conducting. I'll report my findings unless you absove me of it, but I must admit I am curious anyhow.

    Idea: what if you packed an aluminum seatpost with sponge-like material (sponge, cork)? couldn't it absorb some of the vibration experienced by the walls of the seatpost?

  13. #13
    usnagent007
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    Another idea:
    ~like the old quill stem idea, except inside a seatpost.
    Why?
    1.the clamping from inside and out would mean it is more secure.
    2.the clamping on the inside, along with the bolt on the inside, would give the post another avenue and more material to dissipate vibrations.

    diagram of how this would look internally:
    ~consider the fat internal part mobile/adjustable so that it can be clamped at the same altitude as the external seatpost clamp ~ in the same way that threadless stems clamping onto a carbon fork can have an wedge inside the fork to give the stem more solidarity.

  14. #14
    Guest
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    Lance, I just build up a bike and have a carbon seat post. Aside from the expense aspect and I wanted a full set, I see no technological reason for such unless you're a sponsored competitor. The only other reason is if you want and can afford one.

    If you're considering either or choices of where to spend your money, I'd pick other areas where weight can have a more benefical affect. ie: wheels, tires, pedals, crank, etc. The stem would be my last choice.

  15. #15
    serial mender
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    007, interesting idea. Unfortunately, I am not sure that it would work. If I have understood your picture correctly, wouldn't you have to remove the saddle to adjust the height?

    Also, you would add substantial weight by having a bolt run the whole length of the seat post. By "substantial weight" I mean in proportion to the weight of the seatpost and the clamp. Obviously, the bolt would be small in comparison to the total weight of the bike, but it would likely be as much as 10 times the weight of a seatpost clamp.

    Nevertheless, interesting idea.

    Cheers,
    Jamie

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