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Thread: Bianchi Sizing

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    Bianchi Sizing

    In a Trek I take a 56cm Medium, in a scott 56cm Large,being looking at a Bianchi Frame, and it looks like I could be a 58cm, Is this right?!

    Thanks for any info

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Depends on which Bianchi frame your looking at. Since Bianchi frames are built on at least 2 or 3 different continents (Italy,Taiwan & California) its best to get the actual tt and st lengths on the frame your considering buying.
    Last edited by jimbud; 01-07-07 at 01:15 PM.

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    Frame Sizing

    Looking at the 928L Which I belive is a traditional frame, i.e like trek

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Here is the geometry for 2006 928 carbon frame


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    Against a Trek medium 56, it, looks like a Bianchi equal is a 59!

    Trek measurements http://www.trekbike.co.uk/2007/bikes...ngeID=0&ID=325

    Do you agree?

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Go to the Bianchi web site and make sure you know where the measurements are being taken from. C to C or C to T.

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    It is fantastic. voltman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martins
    Against a Trek medium 56, it, looks like a Bianchi equal is a 59!

    Trek measurements http://www.trekbike.co.uk/2007/bikes...ngeID=0&ID=325

    Do you agree?
    I do not agree.

    Compare the Trek effective top tube to the Bianchi virtual (not actual) top tube.

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    So............A Bianchi 57cm frame is Equal to a Trek 56cm? agreed?

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    Isn't this what bike shops are for? Go to your Bianchi dealer and test ride the bikes. And then buy from the Bianchi dealer, not one of those E-Bay discounters.

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    Isn't this what bike shops are for? Go to your Bianchi dealer and test ride the bikes. And then buy from the Bianchi dealer, not one of those E-Bay discounters.
    Yes, I agree with Alan. I'm not sure any one a round here wants to tell what sized bike to get with out you at least going to a dealer and checking it out. Even if you don't test ride one go ask for a bike fitting or size recommendation.

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    Senior Member biker7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbud
    Yes, I agree with Alan. I'm not sure any one a round here wants to tell what sized bike to get with out you at least going to a dealer and checking it out. Even if you don't test ride one go ask for a bike fitting or size recommendation.
    I don't agree. Don't go to a local bike shop...or do it if you feel like it but not essential. Post the geometry of the bike that fits you perfectly. If you have your heart set on a Bianchi, it is not hard to deduce which frame size will fit you. The best way to choose a new frame is to take every dimension off of your old frame that fits perfectly and keep this for reference. Measurements should include top of saddle to BB distance, set back, saddle tip to handlebar centerline, saddle to handlebar drop, handle bar height to ground etc. There are many nuances to bike fit. Bianchi's tend to have friendly geometry with a longer head tube relative to top tube length. Find your current bike geometry on the web and post it.
    HTH,
    George

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    Duathlete indygreg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    Isn't this what bike shops are for? Go to your Bianchi dealer and test ride the bikes. And then buy from the Bianchi dealer, not one of those E-Bay discounters.
    Damn you communist Internet!!!!
    Run, Bike, Run.

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biker7
    I don't agree. Don't go to a local bike shop...or do it if you feel like it but not essential. Post the geometry of the bike that fits you perfectly. If you have your heart set on a Bianchi, it is not hard to deduce which frame size will fit you. The best way to choose a new frame is to take every dimension off of your old frame that fits perfectly and keep this for reference. Measurements should include top of saddle to BB distance, set back, saddle tip to handlebar centerline, saddle to handlebar drop, handle bar height to ground etc. There are many nuances to bike fit. Bianchi's tend to have friendly geometry with a longer head tube relative to top tube length. Find your current bike geometry on the web and post it.
    HTH,
    George
    I just didn't want someone on this forum buying a expensive bike solely on my or a couple of other forum members quick advice. The OP didn't seam interested in doing some simple background work on the frame he wanted to buy. You're more then welcome to PM him and make a recommendation to him.

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    Dances With Cars TRaffic Jammer's Avatar
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    I'm of the test it school of thought on this....then you can order on-line..once you know your size for sure in that particular frame. Or use the online pricing as a haggle point at the LBS.

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    Senior Member biker7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbud
    I just didn't want someone on this forum buying a expensive bike solely on my or a couple of other forum members quick advice. The OP didn't seam interested in doing some simple background work on the frame he wanted to buy. You're more then welcome to PM him and make a recommendation to him.
    Not that per se Jim...more like why pay an inflated price for a bike and...many fittings performed at bike shops are bogus anyway. There are notable exceptions and many great shops but just as many staffed with those that don't quite get it. The best fitter is the rider him or herself. Fitting is an evolution...that occurs over many miles in the saddle to determine what works best. It normally is a work in progress as our bodies and preferences evolve over time as well. Me for example...I have just moved from a Bianchi down a frame size to a new Look 555 frame and in spite of all I know I am still dialing it in. I want a more aero position on my bike. Others have different objectives...comfort over speed etc.
    If you find a bike that fits like a glove, as I stated, record every dimension and keep a file. This can then be compared to any new frame you are considering to see if the new bike can be set up to fit like that last one. Deferring to a bike shop guy unless he is a knowledgeable fitter like Roadwarrior and others on this forum is a roll of the dice.
    George

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    Senior Member jimbud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biker7
    Not that per se Jim...more like why pay an inflated price for a bike and...many fittings performed at bike shops are bogus anyway. There are notable exceptions and many great shops but just as many staffed with those that don't quite get it. The best fitter is the rider him or herself. Fitting is an evolution...that occurs over many miles in the saddle to determine what works best. It normally is a work in progress as our bodies and preferences evolve over time as well. Me for example...I have just moved from a Bianchi down a frame size to a new Look 555 frame and in spite of all I know I am still dialing it in. I want a more aero position on my bike. Others have different objectives...comfort over speed etc.
    If you find a bike that fits like a glove, as I stated, record every dimension and keep a file. This can then be compared to any new frame you are considering to see if the new bike can be set up to fit like that last one. Deferring to a bike shop guy unless he is a knowledgeable fitter like Roadwarrior and others on this forum is a roll of the dice.
    George
    Yes, Thats great advice and makes good sense. Nothing quite like experience when it comes to picking the right set up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by biker7
    Not that per se Jim...more like why pay an inflated price for a bike and...many fittings performed at bike shops are bogus anyway. There are notable exceptions and many great shops but just as many staffed with those that don't quite get it. The best fitter is the rider him or herself. Fitting is an evolution...that occurs over many miles in the saddle to determine what works best. It normally is a work in progress as our bodies and preferences evolve over time as well. Me for example...I have just moved from a Bianchi down a frame size to a new Look 555 frame and in spite of all I know I am still dialing it in. I want a more aero position on my bike. Others have different objectives...comfort over speed etc.
    If you find a bike that fits like a glove, as I stated, record every dimension and keep a file. This can then be compared to any new frame you are considering to see if the new bike can be set up to fit like that last one. Deferring to a bike shop guy unless he is a knowledgeable fitter like Roadwarrior and others on this forum is a roll of the dice.
    George
    When people say stuff like "my present bike fits me like a glove" I can't help but wonder what this assessment is based on...

    I suppose everyone is different in how serious they are about cycling, how long they have been riding and how much time they are willing to invest in educating themselves about all that is cycling: fit, form, training, bike maintenance, etc. I think if someone is serious about cycling then they would want to learn all that stuff and would then be able to make educated decisions that are most appropriate for themselves. The alternative is to rely on others with unpredictible results.
    Last edited by OCRider2000; 01-09-07 at 02:36 PM.

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    Senior Member rideon7's Avatar
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    I just bought a Bianchi Volpe a couple of weeks ago, size 58, and it fits like a glove. It fits so well that I am considering buying a Bianchi Virata. Interestingly, the Virata comes (for my purposes) in a size 57, 59, or 61 (not a 58). The geometry of the 59 is 559 mm actual top tube and a 570 virtual top tube (see site below). What gives?

    http://www.bianchiusa.com/07_virata.html

    One of the reasons I'm considering the Virata is because my size 57 LeMond Buenos Aires has never fit me the way I would like. It has a 575 mm virtual top tube. As the salesman who sold me the Volpe put, "I would never put you on a size 57 LeMond" (that LBS sold LeMonds as well--he said I should be on a size 59, but LeMonds have gone full carbon and I want the carbon steel blend).

    Before anyone suggests I go back to that LBS and ride a Virata or two, they don't have any in stock, and I have to drive 200 miles to a bike shop that does have them in stock. Anyone out there with suggestions/tips/experience with Bianchi sizing. If it helps (and doesn't simply add confusion), I am 6' tall with a 33" (85 cm) inseam.

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    L-I-V-I-N dtrain's Avatar
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    I have a 56cm '00 Trek 1000 and a 57cm '05 Bianchi Giro. They fit about the same. Just a hair more clearance on the Bianchi because of the sloping top tube. Don't know if that helps.
    "The older you do get, the more rules they're gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin', man, L-I-V-I-N." - Wooderson

    '11 Fuji SL - '04 Bianchi Imola - '99 Gary Fisher Big Sur

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    Senior Member biker7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideon7
    I just bought a Bianchi Volpe a couple of weeks ago, size 58, and it fits like a glove. It fits so well that I am considering buying a Bianchi Virata. Interestingly, the Virata comes (for my purposes) in a size 57, 59, or 61 (not a 58). The geometry of the 59 is 559 mm actual top tube and a 570 virtual top tube (see site below). What gives?

    http://www.bianchiusa.com/07_virata.html

    One of the reasons I'm considering the Virata is because my size 57 LeMond Buenos Aires has never fit me the way I would like. It has a 575 mm virtual top tube. As the salesman who sold me the Volpe put, "I would never put you on a size 57 LeMond" (that LBS sold LeMonds as well--he said I should be on a size 59, but LeMonds have gone full carbon and I want the carbon steel blend).

    Before anyone suggests I go back to that LBS and ride a Virata or two, they don't have any in stock, and I have to drive 200 miles to a bike shop that does have them in stock. Anyone out there with suggestions/tips/experience with Bianchi sizing. If it helps (and doesn't simply add confusion), I am 6' tall with a 33" (85 cm) inseam.
    What gives is Bianchi as with other manufacturers reduces the number of carbon fiber frame sizes to keep molding costs down...more sizes = more carbon fiber molds. To my mind this is not a big deal but others used to 1-2cm between sizes don't seem to embrace it. A 58 for a 6'er with average leg length as you are is about right. I am 6'1" and rode a 61cm Bianchi Veloce and it fit fine albeit with slightly longer top tube then preferred but nice and generous head tube. I believe your choice is as follows... If you want a bit more comfort, opt for the 59 which will be a hair on the big size. If you want a bit more aero, opt for the 57 with shorter head tube and lower handlebars. The head tube difference is about 20mm between the two sizes. You can ride either and in fact set them each up to fit very close to the same.
    George

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    Senior Member jburnsdo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    Isn't this what bike shops are for? Go to your Bianchi dealer and test ride the bikes. And then buy from the Bianchi dealer, not one of those E-Bay discounters.

    This is always true, but more so if you're looking at a Bianchi. I normally ride a CDale in a 56cm, but, the best top tube fit for me in my bianchi was a 55. I went over the sizing charts a dozen times trying to figure out why I shouldn't be on a 57 or 59, since that's the best top-tube comparison, but those felt like I was riding a Giraffe. Go figure.

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    Senior Member rideon7's Avatar
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    Thanks for the information. It helps me narrow things down, and it even gives me some inspiration to try putting a 130-mm stem on my 57 cm LeMond, a stem with a fairly steep angle to it, and see if that improves the fit. Still, it's always nice to have an excuse, I mean reason, to be considering another bike.

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