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  1. #1
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    1989 Cannondale 3.0 worth it?

    I used to be into bicycling long distance and in 1989 I bought a Cannondale 3.0 Aluminum series with Shimano 105 gear train. I haven't ridden it since the early 90's when I moved from Charleston South Carolina. While I lived in Connecticut (US Navy keeps me goin') I got into Mountain biking and haven't ridden the Cannondale since. In November I moved to Northern Virginia and recently bought a Specialized Hardrock Mountain bike. I've found that many of the trails are paved and in very good shape and you can ride 50-60 miles or more on some of them.

    Here's my question...while I'm getting a good workout with the mountain bike (25-35 mile rides) the urge to go further and further is setting in and I'm asking for opinions on whether (if it were you) would get the Cannondale tuned up and going again (it's in excellent shape and very clean) or if I should just wait until next year (maybe) and cough up the cash for a new bike. When I bought it it was a $800 bike and even the red paint is clean (except the back forks, from leaning on things). Not sure about flat spots on the Wolber rims. Thanks in advance and...later

  2. #2
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thingsbike
    I used to be into bicycling long distance and in 1989 I bought a Cannondale 3.0 Aluminum series with Shimano 105 gear train. I haven't ridden it since the early 90's when I moved from Charleston South Carolina. While I lived in Connecticut (US Navy keeps me goin') I got into Mountain biking and haven't ridden the Cannondale since. In November I moved to Northern Virginia and recently bought a Specialized Hardrock Mountain bike. I've found that many of the trails are paved and in very good shape and you can ride 50-60 miles or more on some of them.

    Here's my question...while I'm getting a good workout with the mountain bike (25-35 mile rides) the urge to go further and further is setting in and I'm asking for opinions on whether (if it were you) would get the Cannondale tuned up and going again (it's in excellent shape and very clean) or if I should just wait until next year (maybe) and cough up the cash for a new bike. When I bought it it was a $800 bike and even the red paint is clean (except the back forks, from leaning on things). Not sure about flat spots on the Wolber rims. Thanks in advance and...later
    Maybe $50 for a tuneup so you can save for a new one/ Your'e kidding right. Tune it up and ride. BTW bikes don't have "back forks"

  3. #3
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    I know they're not called forks but I couldn't think of it at the time...oops!

  4. #4
    Evil Genius capsicum's Avatar
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    seat stays (upper) or chain stays(lower; either side not just the chain side) as a whole its the rear triangle.
    "Data is not the plural form of annecdote."
    "yuo ned to be deadurcated"

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    Thanks, I kept thinking downstays but just couldn't get it...

  6. #6
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    I wouldn't bother getting a new bike, especially if you ride primarily mountain. 105 is pretty decent stuff, and the 3.0 is a pretty decent frame for its time.

  7. #7
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    thingsbike - I think it depends on what shape the bike is in, how serious you are, and how much it will cost to get it running smoothly. I assume you have downtube index shifters and will need a fresh set of tires and a tune up. How many miles are on the drive train ? Ride it for awhile and if you get more serious, use it as a beater back-up. I had a 1988 Cannondale 3.0 that I have used as a 2nd back-up beater. I loaned it to my brother-in-law a few years ago and he loaned it to someone else.

  8. #8
    Pat
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    Quote Originally Posted by thingsbike
    I used to be into bicycling long distance and in 1989 I bought a Cannondale 3.0 Aluminum series with Shimano 105 gear train. I haven't ridden it since the early 90's when I moved from Charleston South Carolina. While I lived in Connecticut (US Navy keeps me goin') I got into Mountain biking and haven't ridden the Cannondale since. In November I moved to Northern Virginia and recently bought a Specialized Hardrock Mountain bike. I've found that many of the trails are paved and in very good shape and you can ride 50-60 miles or more on some of them.

    Here's my question...while I'm getting a good workout with the mountain bike (25-35 mile rides) the urge to go further and further is setting in and I'm asking for opinions on whether (if it were you) would get the Cannondale tuned up and going again (it's in excellent shape and very clean) or if I should just wait until next year (maybe) and cough up the cash for a new bike. When I bought it it was a $800 bike and even the red paint is clean (except the back forks, from leaning on things). Not sure about flat spots on the Wolber rims. Thanks in advance and...later
    The Cannondale CAAD 3 with Shimano 105 is a perfectly functional bike. I would suggest you get it tuned up and checked over for road worthiness and ride it. It is still a good bicycle. I have one that I use as my backup bike and really I do just as well on it as I do on my Cannondale CAAD 5. After a certain point, improving the bike does not make much difference.

  9. #9
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    the CAAD 3 Is not a Cannondale 3.0. Still, cannondale is a good company, and that is a good bike. a 50 dollar tune up is definly worth it. go for it, man.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    The flat spot on the rim may be fixed during the tune up.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  11. #11
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    IMHO, ride it for now and save for a new one. You won't be able to upgrade the 3.0 due to the axle spacing of 126 mm. Since it is aluminium, you can not bend the chainstay to accept the current standard of 130 mm. Also, your components are a little obsolete so you may have trouble finding replacement parts

  12. #12
    Crank Crushing Redneck SamDaBikinMan's Avatar
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    Ride it and save for the new bike. "If it ain't broke then go out and buy a brand new one!" OoooPPSS, I mean "don't fix it"..
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the input...I got an estimate of $170.00 for 2 new tires and tubes, 1 new brake cable and adjustment, Handlebar tape, true the back wheel and a couple minor adjustments...I went out and spent $85.00 on parts and did the work myself, the only thing I have left to do is put the tape on the handlebars. I understand they have to make a living but it took me about 45 minutes for the above work.

    They said I didn't need a full tune up but what should I take apart and lubricate? 10 years is a long time for a bike to be sitting around (plus 5 years of riding).

    Mtnman: Didn't think about parts being obsolete, hopefully they hold up for a year or two.

    marnan: The bike really is in good shape. I rode it quite a bit for about 5 years but that was before kids and I had lots of time to tinker and keep it in excellent shape.

  14. #14
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Hubs and bottom bracket may need to be repacked or even have the bearings replaced.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  15. #15
    auk
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtnMan
    IMHO, ride it for now and save for a new one. You won't be able to upgrade the 3.0 due to the axle spacing of 126 mm. Since it is aluminium, you can not bend the chainstay to accept the current standard of 130 mm. Also, your components are a little obsolete so you may have trouble finding replacement parts
    The 3.0 is not a 126mm spacing that I'm aware of and mine certainly was not. Came with 7spd, upgraded to 8spd STI, then to 9spd STI. I would measure the rear spacing first, but I'm near positive that it is going to be 130mm. It is a great frameset. Remember they (Cannondale) tended to use the same frame for all its Road series line. $400 bike had the same frame as the $2000 bike of it time. Ride it and enjoy. If the urge to continue grabs you, then upgrade either the components or the bike.

    Dave

  16. #16
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    7 speed = 126 mm

    If you got a nine speed in your chainstays, you forced it in there and lived to tell about it

  17. #17
    One knee is enough SchreiberBike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtnMan
    7 speed = 126 mm

    If you got a nine speed in your chainstays, you forced it in there and lived to tell about it
    During the transition from 126 to 130mm dropouts, at least some Cannondales were made with 130mm seven speed hubs. C-dale generally makes one frame design which they then use on a wide number of different models. The same frame (with different decals) is used on a high-end nine speed, then when they build up 7 speed wheels for the lower-end model, they add a spacer.
    "The more you tighten your grip . . . the more star systems will slip through your fingers."

  18. #18
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    I stand corrected. Thanks for the info.

  19. #19
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    New tubes, tires, handlebar tape, sprockets cleaned and oiled, brake cable replaced, and a coat of wax...looks a little different than a few days ago. Including a $20 Cateye computer (to replace the ancient one), I have about $100 in it. Took it for a quick spin in between rain and it works like a champ. Needs a little adjusting on the rear derailer and the plastic part of the toe straps are broke on both sides (didn't notice that before) but other than that it's good to go.

    Any suggestions on toe straps? I couldn't find the shoes that go with them anyway.

  20. #20
    Perineal Pressurized dobber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thingsbike
    Any suggestions on toe straps? I couldn't find the shoes that go with them anyway.
    Go clipless, its the only way to pedal

  21. #21
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    I have an 88 cannondale criterium and it has an 8spd cluster in the back. I love the bike, enjoy yours.

  22. #22
    ???What??? barleyrocket's Avatar
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    My 3.0 is currently being built back up. It has a 9 speed cluster in the back. the frame is as stiff as you'll find. every effort you put into the pedels goes into turing the wheels. I plan on keeping mine untill it won't function any more. When you have the chance to buy a new one, do as well. you can always use more bikes. I'm currently up to 6 myself.
    ???Huh???

  23. #23
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtnMan
    7 speed = 126 mm

    If you got a nine speed in your chainstays, you forced it in there and lived to tell about it
    I have an older Cannondale 2.8 frame that will accept a 130mm rear hub. Mine may be spaced at 128mm.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  24. #24
    Senior Member marcusbandito's Avatar
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    I ride a 1995 Cannondale frame. I'm not sure what frame version though, anyone know?

    Anyways, it came 7speed RSX and I upgraded to 9 speed. The rear measures out at 130mm.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Ebbtide's Avatar
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    I used to ride around Mayport and Charleston in the 80's. My friend had a Cannondale and I secretly drolled over (I had a plane jane nishiki). Today, I commute on a 87' Cannondale everyday. Get yours fixed up and start riding. I did put a 20.00 carbon fork off e-bay on it but it only helped the looks.

    If you really feel the need to upgrade have at it, but you will not notice much difference between the old and new. I also have a new road bike to make that comparison, but thats just me.

    GO NAVY!

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