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  1. #1
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    Help with bike size - have measurements - need opinions

    So, after a lot of thought and experimentation I am really REALLY leaning towards the Motobecane Ti from BD. I've not 100% decided, so I'm still open. But this is the only Ti bike I can afford - I'd really like a Ti bike after always having steel. I don't like the way alu feels and I can't afford really lightweight steel. Carbon is my second choice.

    $1700 is my absolute max but I'd rather not go over $1500.


    This one, in particular: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...heat_rival.htm

    It says it's $1700 but once you put it in the cart it's $1500.

    If I find myself with an extra $400 (un-****ing likely) then I would get the next one up: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...hamp_ti_10.htm


    So, now I have to figure out whether or not to get the 48cm or the 51cm.

    Here are my body measurements. Sorry for the cramped label and measurement but even if I put in spacing it goes away once I hit submit.

    Body Part cm
    --------------------------------
    Inseam 76
    Trunk 58
    Forearm 29.5
    Arm 58
    Thigh 58.5
    Lower Leg 51
    Sternum Notch 135
    Total Body Height 163


    Here are my fit results from competitive cyclist:

    Measurement
    --------------------------------
    C-C 49-50
    C-T 50-51
    TT 49-50
    Stem 10
    BB-Saddle 64.5-66.5
    Saddle-HB 46-47
    Saddle setback 3.6-4


    Here is the bike geometry for this bike for the 48 and 51:

    Motobecane 48cm 51cm
    -------------------------------------------
    C-T 48cm 51cm
    Top Tube 535 540
    Chain Stay 405 405
    BB Drop 68 70
    Fork Offset 43 43
    Head Tube Angle 73 73
    Seat Tube Angle 74 74
    Wheel Base 970 975
    Stand Over 28.7 29.9
    BB Height na na
    Head Tube Length 110 130




    I feel like I am right in between. Maybe a 50.


    Can I get some opinions on which would be better or just opinions?


    Aside: I've decided not to develop a relationship with any of the multiple LBSs around here. Not because they're not good but because I know I won't go there for repairs or parts. I'm going to do the work myself. While I've only done minor gear/brake tuning, etc, on my mtb I am confident I can service my own bike. I'm extremely, extremely handy. I've replaced the suspension in my minivan (both struts and shocks - took me about 7 hours, though), installed ceilings in my house, replaced my back porch, rewired my kitchen, laid down tile floors, and a lot more. Some of it with help from my husband but a lot of it by myself with the internet for referencing. So, I know me. If I have a problem with my bike I'm going to put it on my bike stand and do it myself - looking it up on youtube or getting advice from my brother.
    Last edited by Sabby; 04-24-13 at 03:03 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    Aside: I've decided not to develop a relationship with any of the multiple LBSs around here. Not because they're not good but because I know I won't go there for repairs or parts. I'm going to do the work myself. While I've only done minor gear/brake tuning, etc, on my mtb I am confident I can service my own bike. I'm extremely, extremely handy. I've replaced the suspension in my minivan (both struts and shocks - took me about 7 hours, though), installed ceilings in my house, replaced my back porch, rewired my kitchen, laid down tile floors, and a lot more. Some of it with help from my husband but a lot of it by myself with the internet for referencing. So, I know me. If I have a problem with my bike I'm going to put it on my bike stand and do it myself - looking it up on youtube or getting advice from my brother.
    I'm sorry I can't help with the bike fit. Campag4life is your main man for that on the 41. If he doesn't chime in, go ahead and PM him and ask him to get involved in your thread.

    But I would like to offer some advice regarding your LBS. No, I am not one of the buy only from your LBS type folks. As much as anyone out here I understand (and agree) that some cyclists simply can't afford to ride in the style they would like at LBS prices. I buy nearly all my "big" stuff online, on ebay, Amazon, and various direct shops. And I do all my own mechanical work with the exception of an occasional headset crown race setting job on an odd head tube fork for which I just cannot justify buying the tool. So up to that point we are saying exactly the same thing. But beyond that you really need a STRONG relationship with your LBS. You have made your choice about where to buy big stuff and you have to face up to it when you deal with your LBS for the occasional odd item. In fact I think it is wise to be right out front with them. Let them know how you operate, but that you value them being there for the things you have to have right now, and don't want to wait a few days to be delivered. Demonstrate your commitment by focusing your business on one main shop. Try to get them involved in your projects buy buying the odds and ends from them you need for maintenance or accessories to complete a big job like rim tape, grease, chain lube, handlebar spacers, bar tape, tubes, water bottles, on-sale clothing items (shoes) that are best fitted in person, etc. If they are smart, they will understand that different customers have different needs, and it is in their interest to accommodate those needs. If they are not interested in your business, such as it is, go elsewhere and try again. And you are making a mistake if you are too embarrassed to take that Motobecane into the shop for some help from time to time. I don't doubt your DIY skills, but everyone needs some wrenching guidance from time to time.

    Over the years I have given much more business to my LBS (just 1 1/2 blocks down the street) than someone who buys an expensive bike from them, hangs it in the garage and then is never seen again. Everyone does it differently. If it is a good shop, they will respect the type of cycling customer you need to be and help you to be that.

    Robert

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    I'm sorry I can't help with the bike fit. Campag4life is your main man for that on the 41. If he doesn't chime in, go ahead and PM him and ask him to get involved in your thread.

    But I would like to offer some advice regarding your LBS. No, I am not one of the buy only from your LBS type folks. As much as anyone out here I understand (and agree) that some cyclists simply can't afford to ride in the style they would like at LBS prices. I buy nearly all my "big" stuff online, on ebay, Amazon, and various direct shops. And I do all my own mechanical work with the exception of an occasional headset crown race setting job on an odd head tube fork for which I just cannot justify buying the tool. So up to that point we are saying exactly the same thing. But beyond that you really need a STRONG relationship with your LBS. You have made your choice about where to buy big stuff and you have to face up to it when you deal with your LBS for the occasional odd item. In fact I think it is wise to be right out front with them. Let them know how you operate, but that you value them being there for the things you have to have right now, and don't want to wait a few days to be delivered. Demonstrate your commitment by focusing your business on one main shop. Try to get them involved in your projects buy buying the odds and ends from them you need for maintenance or accessories to complete a big job like rim tape, grease, chain lube, handlebar spacers, bar tape, tubes, water bottles, on-sale clothing items (shoes) that are best fitted in person, etc. If they are smart, they will understand that different customers have different needs, and it is in their interest to accommodate those needs. If they are not interested in your business, such as it is, go elsewhere and try again. And you are making a mistake if you are too embarrassed to take that Motobecane into the shop for some help from time to time. I don't doubt your DIY skills, but everyone needs some wrenching guidance from time to time.

    Over the years I have given much more business to my LBS (just 1 1/2 blocks down the street) than someone who buys an expensive bike from them, hangs it in the garage and then is never seen again. Everyone does it differently. If it is a good shop, they will respect the type of cycling customer you need to be and help you to be that.

    Robert

    Hi Robert,

    Thanks for responding. I'm not at all anti-LBS. There's a great one in Little Five Points (Atlanta - Outback Bikes), which is a half-mile down the road from my house.

    If there would be an issue I couldn't handle I'd certainly take it in and tell them where I got the bike. All they sell is Specialized. So, I don't think they'd have a problem if I brought in a bike I didn't buy from them.

    I was just being realistic. I don't plan to race, just ride, particularly in groups. I'm social about marathoning so I know I'll be social about cycling. I imagine 99.9% of the things I will run into will be stuff I can handle.

    I do plan to strip my cheap mtb to its frame and build it up nicer. But not right away. I plan to do that myself as a project.

    Anyway, I didn't mean to imply that I would never go into my LBS or that I'd be embarrassed I bought a bike from BD (I am never embarrassed to save money). I just meant it's likely I'll go in there once every few years. And since I don't need the free servicing that comes with buying a bike at the LBS, etc, I am completely confident getting a bike from BD after reading reviews from other folks.

    But, thanks for helping clarify that point. I didn't want to give the wrong idea.

    Jen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    Hi Robert,

    Thanks for responding. I'm not at all anti-LBS. There's a great one in Little Five Points (Atlanta - Outback Bikes), which is a half-mile down the road from my house.

    If there would be an issue I couldn't handle I'd certainly take it in and tell them where I got the bike. All they sell is Specialized. So, I don't think they'd have a problem if I brought in a bike I didn't buy from them.

    I was just being realistic. I don't plan to race, just ride, particularly in groups. I'm social about marathoning so I know I'll be social about cycling. I imagine 99.9% of the things I will run into will be stuff I can handle.

    I do plan to strip my cheap mtb to its frame and build it up nicer. But not right away. I plan to do that myself as a project.

    Anyway, I didn't mean to imply that I would never go into my LBS or that I'd be embarrassed I bought a bike from BD (I am never embarrassed to save money). I just meant it's likely I'll go in there once every few years. And since I don't need the free servicing that comes with buying a bike at the LBS, etc, I am completely confident getting a bike from BD after reading reviews from other folks.

    But, thanks for helping clarify that point. I didn't want to give the wrong idea.

    Jen
    Jen, understood. BTW, more to the point, I think that Motobecane frame is dynamite for cost-effective Ti cycling. I am sure you will enjoy it.

    Robert

  5. #5
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    Can't help with size, but I wouldn't spend any more, much less $400, for Ultegra with FSA over full Rival. If you "need" to spend the extra, unload the Askium's for $200 and you have $600 for a sweet set of custom wheels.

    (F.d., I am a very happy Rival owner).

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    Jen, understood. BTW, more to the point, I think that Motobecane frame is dynamite for cost-effective Ti cycling. I am sure you will enjoy it.

    Robert
    Thanks! I am very excited to get that Ti frame!

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    Quote Originally Posted by unionmade View Post
    Can't help with size, but I wouldn't spend any more, much less $400, for Ultegra with FSA over full Rival. If you "need" to spend the extra, unload the Askium's for $200 and you have $600 for a sweet set of custom wheels.

    (F.d., I am a very happy Rival owner).
    See, I have no preference for Shimano or SRAM. My history is with my mtb, which has cheapo Shimano grip-twist shifters. So, I think I am a prime candidate for any type of group. From what I've seen I'll never be able to afford Campy, but it's beautiful stuff.

    A friend of mine said she didn't like how loud SRAM was (don't know which version) but that it worked perfectly well. I have no idea what she means by loud or if I would even care.

  8. #8
    has a Large Member Campag4life's Avatar
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    Sabby,
    Context is always important in choosing bike frame size. Have you owned a road bike before?...just a mtb?
    Tell us what kind of mtb'er you are. Let's consider your mtb fit. Do you ride with flat bar or riser bar?
    Is your handlebar height lower than your saddle? Are you competitive rider or a cruiser?

    Above will help with your road bike decision. I ride both mtb and road bike. The position on both is pretty close...but a bit more stretched out on my road bike.
    As a general rule, I believe those coming off a mtb to roadbiking prefer a more upright position. For this reason, I suggest a comfort geometry...many of these bikes on the market. My preference is carbon for a road bike. Even though you don't frequent any lbs, choosing a frame size by the nos. is a virtual sense is tricky. This is because riding position 'preference' can trump the length of your body parts. Plus your flexibility factors in.
    So I encourage you to ride a couple of different road bikes and take some notes and maybe even bring your smart phone for a picture or two about set up like stem position.

    Generally, for those coming off mtb's, they won't like the more aggressive road bike position. I don't like an aggressive position on a road bike anyway because I ride long distances and want the drops to be comfortable as another hand position when riding aggressively.

    So all said without knowing you or your riding preference, I say size up. This is for a taller head tube and more upright position. I suggest a 51. But before you order the bike, go ride some road bikes at a couple of local shops. Test a Roubaix or Secteur (same geo in Al)...or Synapse...or Defy...or other brand comfort geometry.
    Let us know what you decide.

  9. #9
    Senior Member kleng's Avatar
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    Women, generally have a shorter torso and shorter arms than men, so you should go for the shortest top tube, the smaller stand over height would be an advantage

    Your position can be adjusted later by:

    1) either using a longer stem or a seatpost with extra set back or moving the seat back if you need extra reach.

    or

    2) a slightly shorter stem or a zero set back seat post or move the seat forward if top tube is a little bit too long

    Given your inseam of 76cm and that cranks are normally on a small frame are 170mm (17cm) long,the 48cm seat post length , will give you about 10cm of seatpost extension which is about right, depending on what saddle, shoe or pedals you are going to use

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
    Sabby,
    Context is always important in choosing bike frame size. Have you owned a road bike before?...just a mtb?
    Tell us what kind of mtb'er you are. Let's consider your mtb fit. Do you ride with flat bar or riser bar?
    Is your handlebar height lower than your saddle? Are you competitive rider or a cruiser?
    I'm so glad you're here! So, the last time I rode a road bike was around 1996. I had red and yellow Fuji 10-speed. I don't remember what model. I used it to commute to and from class in college until it got stolen.

    Since 2008 I've commuted on a mtb actual mtbing and some group road rides. Since the group rides are for all comers I generally don't have a problem keeping up. I ain't a lightweight woman (140lbs of solid muscle YAAARRGHH!...ahem, maybe not quite) but I'm pretty fit.

    The bar has a very slight rise, but that's what came with it. I've ridden flat before and never noticed it was better or worse.

    My handlebar is probably a little lower than my saddle, or close to even. I based the saddle height on being able to have only the slightest bend in my knee and the bottom of the pedal cycle. I can tell you I am always hefting my bottom back on the back of my saddle. I feel like the mtb is too short between saddle and bar.

    Note, I was not at all fitted for my mtb. I just got one that wasn't too big. I think it might be a bit small.

    If by aggressive you mean I like to put it out there and power up hills and get myself going, then yes. The only time I tool around is when I am with my son, who is 12.

    But, I am not a competitor. I don't like to actually compete. I just like to put out effort, feel my heart and muscles work hard.

    Above will help with your road bike decision. I ride both mtb and road bike. The position on both is pretty close...but a bit more stretched out on my road bike.
    As a general rule, I believe those coming off a mtb to roadbiking prefer a more upright position. For this reason, I suggest a comfort geometry...many of these bikes on the market. My preference is carbon for a road bike. Even though you don't frequent any lbs, choosing a frame size by the nos. is a virtual sense is tricky. This is because riding position 'preference' can trump the length of your body parts. Plus your flexibility factors in.
    So I encourage you to ride a couple of different road bikes and take some notes and maybe even bring your smart phone for a picture or two about set up like stem position.
    Based on my experimentation I feel like I like to be stretched out a bit. It was a bit unnerving to be in a road bike position at first but I got used to it.

    Flexibility: I tend to have tight hammies from running but when I cycle more it helps counter that. My flexibility changes easily.


    Generally, for those coming off mtb's, they won't like the more aggressive road bike position. I don't like an aggressive position on a road bike anyway because I ride long distances and want the drops to be comfortable as another hand position when riding aggressively.
    I would imagine I would be in the middle. I don't like being very upright.

    So all said without knowing you or your riding preference, I say size up. This is for a taller head tube and more upright position. I suggest a 51. But before you order the bike, go ride some road bikes at a couple of local shops. Test a Roubaix or Secteur (same geo in Al)...or Synapse...or Defy...or other brand comfort geometry.
    Let us know what you decide.
    OK, I'll check those out. But thanks! I was thinking size up, too.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleng View Post
    Women, generally have a shorter torso and shorter arms than men, so you should go for the shortest top tube, the smaller stand over height would be an advantage

    Your position can be adjusted later by:

    1) either using a longer stem or a seatpost with extra set back or moving the seat back if you need extra reach.

    or

    2) a slightly shorter stem or a zero set back seat post or move the seat forward if top tube is a little bit too long

    Given your inseam of 76cm and that cranks are normally on a small frame are 170mm (17cm) long,the 48cm seat post length , will give you about 10cm of seatpost extension which is about right, depending on what saddle, shoe or pedals you are going to use

    I am fairly evenly distributed between torso and legs. I am, unfortunately, not long legged. The top tube lengths between the 48 and the 51 is 0.5cm, so I wonder if that difference matters?

    I will probably use the stock saddle and pedals (PD-5610 Road Clipless Pedals, according to the site) for a looooong time.

  12. #12
    has a Large Member Campag4life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    I'm so glad you're here! So, the last time I rode a road bike was around 1996. I had red and yellow Fuji 10-speed. I don't remember what model. I used it to commute to and from class in college until it got stolen.

    Since 2008 I've commuted on a mtb actual mtbing and some group road rides. Since the group rides are for all comers I generally don't have a problem keeping up. I ain't a lightweight woman (140lbs of solid muscle YAAARRGHH!...ahem, maybe not quite) but I'm pretty fit.

    The bar has a very slight rise, but that's what came with it. I've ridden flat before and never noticed it was better or worse.

    My handlebar is probably a little lower than my saddle, or close to even. I based the saddle height on being able to have only the slightest bend in my knee and the bottom of the pedal cycle. I can tell you I am always hefting my bottom back on the back of my saddle. I feel like the mtb is too short between saddle and bar.

    Note, I was not at all fitted for my mtb. I just got one that wasn't too big. I think it might be a bit small.

    If by aggressive you mean I like to put it out there and power up hills and get myself going, then yes. The only time I tool around is when I am with my son, who is 12.

    But, I am not a competitor. I don't like to actually compete. I just like to put out effort, feel my heart and muscles work hard.



    Based on my experimentation I feel like I like to be stretched out a bit. It was a bit unnerving to be in a road bike position at first but I got used to it.

    Flexibility: I tend to have tight hammies from running but when I cycle more it helps counter that. My flexibility changes easily.




    I would imagine I would be in the middle. I don't like being very upright.



    OK, I'll check those out. But thanks! I was thinking size up, too.
    Based upon everything you wrote, I still suggest the 51 because you have some tolerance for stetching out and you can always get your handlebar low enough with a 51 with conventional head tube length which that bike has.
    You don't sound to be a perfect candidate for a comfort geometry based upon your comments. You may very well like that Moto Ti bike geometry.
    A bike is a pretty big purchase and so you want to make the best decision about sizing. It wouldn't hurt for you to ride a bike or two at the local bike shop. Do your homework. Its pretty easy to compare the geometry of a bike you would ride at the shop with your Motobecane geo chart. You may have to contact bikedirect to get the head tube length for the 51...a pretty important frame dimension that they tend to leave off their geo chart.
    Have fun. You will love the speed increase of a road bike. As to the competition thing. I say embrace it. There is nothing wrong with friendly competition among your friends you may ride with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
    Based upon everything you wrote, I still suggest the 51 because you have some tolerance for stetching out and you can always get your handlebar low enough with a 51 with conventional head tube length which that bike has.
    You don't sound to be a perfect candidate for a comfort geometry based upon your comments. You may very well like that Moto Ti bike geometry.
    A bike is a pretty big purchase and so you want to make the best decision about sizing. It wouldn't hurt for you to ride a bike or two at the local bike shop. Do your homework. Its pretty easy to compare the geometry of a bike you would ride at the shop with your Motobecane geo chart. You may have to contact bikedirect to get the head tube length for the 51...a pretty important frame dimension that they tend to leave off their geo chart.
    Have fun. You will love the speed increase of a road bike. As to the competition thing. I say embrace it. There is nothing wrong with friendly competition among your friends you may ride with.
    Thanks! I have ridden some bikes, but I didn't do it with an eye towards the things you suggested so I will make a point to do so now. I'll come back and post which ones I liked best based on test rides and also the specs.

    It's a funny thing about competition...I just never feel the urge. Now, I believe I am pretty athletic, in general, so I tend to be decent at anything I try. I know that sounds arrogant. But I do end up being decent. At everything except hitting a ball with an object held in my hand (baseball, tennis). Not the best, but decent. And all I like to do is have fun and I don't find competing to be fun.

    No blood lust in this woman.

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    Jen, I second the remarks about the Rival group. I haven't looked at the two choices you are deciding between, but if the lower priced one is Rival, I say go for it. SRAM provides a lot of value at that level in their product line. I would much rather see you put that money into a wheel upgrade once you get to riding the new bike than spend it on Ultegra + FSA and believe me I know and like both of them. Not saying they are not good, just you don't need to spend the money on that when Rival is your alternative.

    I hope you are having fun with this. It only gets better!

    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    Jen, I second the remarks about the Rival group. I haven't looked at the two choices you are deciding between, but if the lower priced one is Rival, I say go for it. SRAM provides a lot of value at that level in their product line. I would much rather see you put that money into a wheel upgrade once you get to riding the new bike than spend it on Ultegra + FSA and believe me I know and like both of them. Not saying they are not good, just you don't need to spend the money on that when Rival is your alternative.

    I hope you are having fun with this. It only gets better!

    Robert
    OK, sounds good to me. I'd rather save money! The Rival equipped bike could potentially come with better wheels.

    From the website:

    "Due to Mfg production changes, some lucky customers may have 2013 Rival WiFLi derailleur + 11-32T Cassette+Ritchey PRO Zeta Wheels. No choice/ cannot select"

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    has a Large Member Campag4life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    Thanks! I have ridden some bikes, but I didn't do it with an eye towards the things you suggested so I will make a point to do so now. I'll come back and post which ones I liked best based on test rides and also the specs.

    It's a funny thing about competition...I just never feel the urge. Now, I believe I am pretty athletic, in general, so I tend to be decent at anything I try. I know that sounds arrogant. But I do end up being decent. At everything except hitting a ball with an object held in my hand (baseball, tennis). Not the best, but decent. And all I like to do is have fun and I don't find competing to be fun.

    No blood lust in this woman.
    Good...ride a few bikes...but with intent...toward distilling the best size for you. Takes some pics with your phone and post here. I suggest you ride a Roubaix or equivalent to determine if a comfort geometry makes any sense to you. Post the geo charts of the bikes you ride and the Moto geo chart for the bike you are interested in. By comparing the two you can pretty easily decide if the Moto geo works for you.

    The thing you will find if you take a dive into the murky world of frame sizing for each rider that schools are evenly divided between sizing down or sizing up if unsure. I tend to be in the size up camp. Many are not however...and this is because we are very different in our preferences. As it turns out preference can really trump our physical size and shape. The aggression of the rider and even the distance one rides matters for set up. Some like to sit up and smell the flowers a bit and some want to stare straight down and hammer like there is no tomorrow. I am in between. If you were good at math or want to understand why frame sizing up makes some sense, go to Rivendell's site and read Grant Peterson's fit philosophy. For the average rider aka non racer his philosophy makes a lot of sense.
    Last edited by Campag4life; 04-24-13 at 09:23 AM.

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    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
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    I ride the bike you're looking at and love it. It hasn't been specifically mentioned but keep in mind the effective top tube on the 51 is actually 54cm. Your CC measurements suggest a top tube length of 49-50. Campag always has good advice but I wanted to point that out as it may make a difference, even though the 48 is still just half a cm off from the 51. The geometry on those Lechamps is a little different...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
    Good...ride a few bikes...but with intent...toward distilling the best size for you. Takes some pics with your phone and post here. I suggest you ride a Roubaix or equivalent to determine if a comfort geometry makes any sense to you. Post the geo charts of the bikes you ride and the Moto geo chart for the bike you are interested in. By comparing the two you can pretty easily decide if the Moto geo works for you.

    The thing you will find if you take a dive into the murky world of frame sizing for each rider that schools are evenly divided between sizing down or sizing up if unsure. I tend to be in the size up camp. Many are not however...and this is because we are very different in our preferences. As it turns out preference can really trump our physical size and shape. The aggression of the rider and even the distance one rides matters for set up. Some like to sit up and smell the flowers a bit and some want to stare straight down and hammer like there is no tomorrow. I am in between. If you were good at math or want to understand why frame sizing up makes some sense, go to Rivendell's site and read Grant Peterson's fit philosophy. For the average rider aka non racer his philosophy makes a lot of sense.
    I'll do my best to be thorough. Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by megalowmatt View Post
    I ride the bike you're looking at and love it. It hasn't been specifically mentioned but keep in mind the effective top tube on the 51 is actually 54cm. Your CC measurements suggest a top tube length of 49-50. Campag always has good advice but I wanted to point that out as it may make a difference, even though the 48 is still just half a cm off from the 51. The geometry on those Lechamps is a little different...
    Oh, good. I emailed BD about the top tube length. Sounds like the 51 might stretch me a bit, which may be okay. I know it's a slightly sloped tube, so that length doesn't impact the way a straight tube would, I guess.

    How long have you had yours? Any advice?

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    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    Oh, good. I emailed BD about the top tube length. Sounds like the 51 might stretch me a bit, which may be okay. I know it's a slightly sloped tube, so that length doesn't impact the way a straight tube would, I guess.

    How long have you had yours? Any advice?
    I've had mine for I think ~18 months. Forgot to mention that mine is the SRAM Apex version - what you're looking at is a step up. If they still come with the same saddle, it's pretty bad.

    The top tube measurement on the Lechamp is measured as if it were level (straight tube) - which is called the "effective top tube".

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    has a Large Member Campag4life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabby View Post
    Oh, good. I emailed BD about the top tube length. Sounds like the 51 might stretch me a bit, which may be okay. I know it's a slightly sloped tube, so that length doesn't impact the way a straight tube would, I guess.

    How long have you had yours? Any advice?
    Sabby, let's start with your Moto geometry. Can you post a chart?
    Way to do it is...go to bikedirect site and find chart...Alt + Print Screen and paste into a photo editing program like Paint...crop and save...come here...advanced...and attach...or same to photobucket and post img.
    You need to know head tube length if it isn't post in the chart...it may or may not be...you will have to check.
    Matt makes sense if Moto sizing is slightly different. Frame sizing can vary quite a bit from mfr to mfr.

    Let's see what the Moto geometry looks like...

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    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
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    Here it is...


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    OK, here is the chart. I posted numbers in my original thread but the formatting is awful. So, I took a screenshot, which I should have done in the first place.

    Moto Geometry.png

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    Quote Originally Posted by megalowmatt View Post
    I've had mine for I think ~18 months. Forgot to mention that mine is the SRAM Apex version - what you're looking at is a step up. If they still come with the same saddle, it's pretty bad.

    The top tube measurement on the Lechamp is measured as if it were level (straight tube) - which is called the "effective top tube".
    It's comes with the Ritchey PRO road. I won't know if I like it or not for a while. I'm perfectly happy to keep it as stock for a while and figure out if there is anything that bothers me.

    Thanks for posting that geo chart! I posted one, too, but you posted more and it was just nice of you to do it.

    And, duh on effective top tube length...I shoulda caught that.

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    has a Large Member Campag4life's Avatar
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    I missed the geo metrics in your opening post.
    Here's my take. The 48 and 51 bikes are almost a wash in top tube...only 5mm different...easily tunable with stem length. Since the bikes have the same 74 deg seat tube angle your reach and weight distribution fore/aft for all intents will be about the same on both bikes. There is a 20mm difference in head tube length. This is a game changer and why I recommend the 51 so you won't be too bent over. Bikes change more size to size in terms of frame height than they do reach...even though height affects reach fractionally. With the 51, worse case as your riding develops...you won't need to go any lower than slamming your stem and running negative rise and you will appreciate the longer head tube if you prefer a more upright riding position.

    Before you pull the trigger on the Moto though, ride some bikes to reinforce your decision.
    Below is the chart for the Roubaix considered a comfort or endurance geometry.
    Note that the 52 Roubaix has tallish 145mm head tube versus 130 and almost the same top tube length of the 51 Moto.
    Give the 52 Roubaix a ride...have them flip the stem down.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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