Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Let me check.
    My Bikes
    Of course.
    Posts
    11,195
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    McGyver > Shimano Dura Ace freehub.

    Bought a pair of used Dura Ace carbon wheels a few weeks ago. Going over them today to mount some tires I noticed the free hub was really rough. Took the hub apart to find that water had gotten into the cartridge bearings (this model had cartridges in the freehub, the wheel bearings are cup and cone) and they were pretty rusted.

    Took a look at the Park website and they note that the freehubs, according to Shimano, are not rebuild-able and are a replacement item.

    Hah.

    Popped the seal out, matched a socket to the backside freehub "axle" OD, heated the aluminum body up a bit and whacked it. Out pops the outer bearing. Cleaned the inside of the hub to find a clip holding in the inner bearing. Popped that, whacked it again and out pops the inner bearing. Another whack got it past the outer bearing seat.

    Cleaned it up, greased it a bit, and popped in two bearings I had lying around that matched.

    Badda bing badda boom. $20 vs $200 and smooth as can be.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    783
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Racer Ex View Post
    Bought a pair of used Dura Ace carbon wheels a few weeks ago. Going over them today to mount some tires I noticed the free hub was really rough. Took the hub apart to find that water had gotten into the cartridge bearings (this model had cartridges in the freehub, the wheel bearings are cup and cone) and they were pretty rusted.

    Took a look at the Park website and they note that the freehubs, according to Shimano, are not rebuild-able and are a replacement item.

    Hah.

    Popped the seal out, matched a socket to the backside freehub "axle" OD, heated the aluminum body up a bit and whacked it. Out pops the outer bearing. Cleaned the inside of the hub to find a clip holding in the inner bearing. Popped that, whacked it again and out pops the inner bearing. Another whack got it past the outer bearing seat.

    Cleaned it up, greased it a bit, and popped in two bearings I had lying around that matched.

    Badda bing badda boom. $20 vs $200 and smooth as can be.
    Nice! I don't like the idea of disposable $200+ components either...
    "I had this baby hand made in Tuscany, from titanium blessed by the pope. It weighs less than a fart, and costs more than a divorce..."

  3. #3
    Iconoclast rat fink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    California
    My Bikes
    Colnago Super, Fuji Opus III, Specialized Rockhopper
    Posts
    3,158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Love it. As an auto mechanic by trade, I find myself doing this with a lot switches, PCBs, and other electronic components that you usually need to order a $300 module for. McGyver is my hero.
    "Winning is the best deodorant. Someone can look at your bike and say it stinks, but if you win with it, suddenly it's okay." - Jim Busby

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •