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Thread: TT vs Road Bike

  1. #1
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    TT vs Road Bike

    Hello,

    I regularly compete in a time trial at my local club, and now have a major quandary!
    Which bike to use!!
    • My road bike is a Ridley Noah full spec campag super record 11's,
    • TT bike is a Ridley dean full spec campag super record 11's,
    Plus I have a choice of wheel's, zipp 404's (firecrest), 1080's, 900 (disc)

    I ride with power that averages out at 300 watts over the 25km course which is split into 2 laps but here is the problem there is 100 meters of climbing per lap which is broken down into three hills, 2 climbs of 30m vertical gain and 1 of 40m vertical gain. The hills are all short and very punchy so it is very hard to climb them on a TT bike, but extremely easy to attack them on the road bike.

    The difference being that on average it takes me 2 minutes longer over the climbs on my TT, but I can lose as much as 2 munities on the flats and down hill on my road bike.

    The course record is 38:40, and my personnel best is 39:30 on my TT, but 39:40 on my road bike. Last race I clocked 41:09 on my TT.

    So the question is what should I do as I can’t increase my watts (quickly!!) on the hills on my TT or can I gain the loss of time on the flats on road. Should I try a combination of both bikes.

    Any ideas would be extremely helpful.

  2. #2
    token triathlete Bah Humbug's Avatar
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    Learn to climb with the TT bike. That's the answer.

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    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
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    Can you adjust your position on the road bike to make yourself more aero? What about making changes/adjustments to the TT bike make it climb better?

    Interesting that Tejay stuck with his TT bike for the big final climb of the last ATOC TT and though he didn't have the fastest split, he won the stage.

    Watching it on TV, is was obvious he was much more comfortable climbing and cornering on his TT bike than were many of the other riders on their TTs. Was it the bike, the rider, or both?

  4. #4
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    I'm having trouble seeing how you can lose 2 minutes on the TT bike on climbs totaling about 350 vertical feet. That's likely less than 6-7 minutes of climbing. Hard to see that the TT bike would be 33% slower.

    I'd use the TT bike with the disc and 1080, and work on climbing with the TT bike.

    Also, how are you pacing yourself? if you're not already, you should be going over threshold a bit on the short climbs and recovering on the descents. Because you lose more time on hills, going 105% uphill works out faster than maintaining a steady output.


    And btw, if you can average 300 watts for 40 minutes, and are threatening course records, you're already at a level that you're not likely going to get much useful advice in the 41.
    Last edited by merlinextraligh; 05-21-13 at 12:13 PM.
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    token triathlete Bah Humbug's Avatar
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    Why is it harder for you to climb on the TT bike, anyway? Can't you just get on the bullhorns if you don't want to climb on the aero bars?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
    Why is it harder for you to climb on the TT bike, anyway? Can't you just get on the bullhorns if you don't want to climb on the aero bars?
    about what I was thinking

    stay on the TT bike, learn to climb on it.
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    Senior Member AdelaaR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonz50 View Post
    about what I was thinking
    stay on the TT bike, learn to climb on it.
    I agree.
    I do "De Muur" with my TT bike sometimes to get used to it ... people look at me with strange eyes when I sit at the top to rest a bit and enjoy the view

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    Unless you aren't riding the bullhorns enough on the climbs, the only other difference is the forward seat post and seat tube angles of the tt. That makes you use your quads more and hamstrings/glutes less. Maybe you need to work on strengthening quads.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

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    Your pacing is terrible if you're losing that much time on tiny hills. If you can hit them so hard on the road bike that you're gaining that much time you need to go harder when you aren't on the hills.

  10. #10
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
    Why is it harder for you to climb on the TT bike, anyway? Can't you just get on the bullhorns if you don't want to climb on the aero bars?
    TT bikes don't climb as well as road bikes for 2 reasons 1) weight (TT bikes are almost always heavier), and 2) riding position.

    The weight is a minor factor, particularly with less than 350 vertical feet.

    The difference in position does make a difference, but it's trainable, and you can eliminate some of the disadvantage by training to climb on the TT bike.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  11. #11
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
    you're already at a level that you're not likely going to get much useful advice in the 41.


    So's this kid:


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    token triathlete Bah Humbug's Avatar
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    Right, but he shouldn't be losing as much time as he is from climbing on his TT bike. And the answer isn't switching to the road bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
    I'm having trouble seeing how you can lose 2 minutes on the TT bike on climbs totaling about 350 vertical feet. That's likely less than 6-7 minutes of climbing. Hard to see that the TT bike would be 33% slower.
    may have mis-read...
    I'm reading 2 laps, each with 3 uphills 30,30,40m - so total of 200 m uphill for the entire course... more like 650 ft vertical.

    OP - what kind of rear wheel are you using on the TT? I've only had the chance to use a solid disk a few times, but found them to be much harder to spin up and requiring more effort to keep momentum going on more than false flats... I would think that an open, deep section rim would be easier to keep rolling over short punchy uphills, as would road wheels...
    OK, just re-read - are you using that disk for this? not familiar with the other wheels -1080s, except the 404s would be my choice.

    also, you haven;t mentioned the gearing you have on both bikes, and which gears you are using on either bike on the uphills?

    have you tried just running the slightly higher climbing section on both bikes, independent of the actual TT, to see if you can determine what is slowing you down?
    Given the short climbs, I would think there's something to be done to make the TT bike+you as fast on those uphills.
    Last edited by cyclezen; 05-21-13 at 02:43 PM.
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