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  1. #1
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    What kind of paint does Giant use on their road bikes?

    Does anyone know specifically what type of finish is used on the Giant road bikes?

    Is it enamel, lacquer (nitro based or otherwise), or is it something completely different?

  2. #2
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    No, I don't know specifically the type of paint Giant uses, but I am pretty sure that it is polyurethane. As in the case of auto finishes old-fashioned lacquers and enamels are pretty much obsolete for bikes. During the last gasp hey-day of steel frames, Imron polyurethane and its competitors were fairly standard.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    No, I don't know specifically the type of paint Giant uses, but I am pretty sure that it is polyurethane. As in the case of auto finishes old-fashioned lacquers and enamels are pretty much obsolete for bikes. During the last gasp hey-day of steel frames, Imron polyurethane and its competitors were fairly standard.
    I had briefly considered that it might be polyurethane, but for the fact that it just seems unusually fragile to me (i.e.vulnerable to marring, scratching, chipping, etc.). In the past, my main experience with different types of finishes has been in painting & refinishing guitars (another industry that has switched from lacquers to mostly poly finishes, excepting high end stuff like Gibson or PRS). But the poly finish I've encountered on guitars has always seemed like a veritable suit of armor - not impervious, mind you, but pretty darn scratch and ding resistant compared to nitrocellulose lacquers or even acrylics. I would just have thought that a poly finish on a road bike would be tougher.

    I'm planning to fix up some scratches/chips in the paint on my 2013 Defy so I'm trying to determine what kind of touch-up paint I can use that will lend itself to the proper adhesion/sanding/buffing/etc.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_D View Post
    I had briefly considered that it might be polyurethane, but for the fact that it just seems unusually fragile to me (i.e.vulnerable to marring, scratching, chipping, etc.). In the past, my main experience with different types of finishes has been in painting & refinishing guitars (another industry that has switched from lacquers to mostly poly finishes, excepting high end stuff like Gibson or PRS). But the poly finish I've encountered on guitars has always seemed like a veritable suit of armor - not impervious, mind you, but pretty darn scratch and ding resistant compared to nitrocellulose lacquers or even acrylics. I would just have thought that a poly finish on a road bike would be tougher.

    I'm planning to fix up some scratches/chips in the paint on my 2013 Defy so I'm trying to determine what kind of touch-up paint I can use that will lend itself to the proper adhesion/sanding/buffing/etc.
    Your best bet is to match the color at an auto parts store with the small bottles of touch up paint and included applicators (i.e. brushes). That is not going to be perfect, but I think it is the best you can hope for without getting the precise color in the precise coating formulation. And that might require mixing reactive ingredients like for polyurethane. Sounds like you have been there, done that, so it might not scare you off. For most folks, though, the Dupli-Color stuff at the auto parts store is the way to go.

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