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  1. #1
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    Newbie Bike repair kit

    Hello,
    I just recently bought a used Scattante bike and am putting together a repair kit. From what I understand this is what I plan to buy a spare tube, a couple of CO2 catridges,tire levers and a saddle bag that will carry them. Hopefully the saddle bag will have enough space to carry those along with my phone, wallet etc. Is there a saddle bag kit that comes with all these prepackaged? For inflating the tires at home I am going to buy a seperate hand or floor pump? Anything else i am missing. I tried to find a phone holder and dynamo that would charge my phone while biking but they are way too expensive.

  2. #2
    Senior Member BigJeff's Avatar
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    yes.. just buy one of those......... they are at every bike shop near the bags/parts.

  3. #3
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    I would carry at least a spare tube, tire levers, a multi tool, CO2 and/or pump.

    If there is extra room in the saddle bag maybe add a patch kit, extra chain links.

    For inflating tires at home get a floor pump. Small hand pumps will work, but it usually takes a while to pump up road tires to high pressure.

    I don't have enough room in my saddle bag for a phone and wallet. I usually carry that stuff in my jersey pocket.

  4. #4
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    If you're considering charging your phone, I'm going to assume that you're going for longer rides. Depending on your level of OCD / paranoia (or at least how it compares to mine) you may want to consider carrying 2 or more tubes, a multi-tool / individual tools, and a fibre-spoke or other spoke repair option. I have a very large tail bag as I do a lot of rural rides, and don't like the idea of walking my bike for lack of a < $10 spare.

    As xjustice09x said, wallet goes in the jersey pocket. I do use a holder for my phone even though the bike doesn't charge it. You can find a phone holder for under $20 if you really want one.

  5. #5
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    Regardless of what you get, make sure you know how to use them. I'd recommend "changing" a tube in your living room so that it's not totally foreign to you if you have a flat out on the road. For example if you haven't removed a rear wheel then you should do it 10-15 times, maybe while you're watching some TV show (do the work during the ads).

    The most common cause of flats that I saw (worked in a bike shop for 15 years) is under-inflation. Make sure you have good pressure in your tires every single time you ride. I put one of my floor pumps (the cheapest Bontrager pump - I have 3 of them - and the cheapest Blackburn pumps - I have 2 of them) on my tires virtually every time I've ridden. The cheap pumps work fine, and I can leave them wherever I might need them - one lives in each of the cars, one in the garage, one by my trainer. At $29.99 each it's not expensive (for one) and it'll work for a long time. The Blackburns I got maybe 12-15 years ago, the Bontragers just last year.

    I prefer a frame pump because they don't run out and you can top off a slow leak etc regularly if you're in dire straits. CO2 - when I used CO2 I found that the tire would go flat by the next day. Pumping it up with a floor pump solved that, and a frame pump inflated tire doesn't deflate overnight.

    I carry one or two spare tubes, multi tool, extra drop out, chain tool, tire levers.

    My phone (DroidX), wallet, and keys if applicable go in my jersey pockets. I happen to carry all my bike repair stuff in my pockets too, but they'll fit in a small saddle bag if I pack it carefully.

  6. #6
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    What do you guys think of this http://www.genuineinnovations.com/bi...g-clone-2.html ? It doesn't have a spare tube probably I could add it

  7. #7
    Senior Member eja_ bottecchia's Avatar
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    Depending on where you ride, you may need more than one spare inner tube, or at least a tube patch kit. Where I live goatheads reign supreme. It is not completely uncommon to have 2 or three flats on a 60 miles ride. For the same reason you may want to carry a small hand pump, in case you use up all your CO2 cartridges.

    Have fun, ride safely and welcome aboard.
    My current stable:

    1989 SLX Bottecchia (Campy Athena 11s)
    1999 Cannondale F400 mountain bike
    2012 Bianchi Infinito (Campy Record 11s)
    2012 Colnago C59 in PR99 color scheme (Campy Record 11s)

  8. #8
    Senior Member hokie cycler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by salilsurendran View Post
    What do you guys think of this http://www.genuineinnovations.com/bi...g-clone-2.html ? It doesn't have a spare tube probably I could add it
    Carry two spare tubes. If you get a flat you need to have the extra tube to cover you for the rest of the ride. Flats can come in bunches, sometimes because the cause of the flat might be missed and is still in the tire.

    Don't take your wallet, take your driver's license, credit card and some cash and put a binder clip on them and stuff this and your phone into a zip lock baggie and put it in your jersey pocket.

  9. #9
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    I'm very new to the forum and also newly back into cycling. Enjoyed the comments to this and am glad that I'm becoming more prepared. After looking at the replies I think I'm in reasonable shape. A LBS was closing due to retirement and had a great deal on a medium topeak qucik release seat bag. It expands if required but I haven't done that yet. Inside I keep a spare tube with a pair of nitrile gloves wrapped around the tube and then it put back into the tube box. (box is a bit rounded but still protects the tube), a zepplin cO2 inflator with two cartridges, a tube patch kit, all allen keys for bike (separate allen key set from auto tools with rubber band around them), expired ID with house key attached, $12.20, and a pair of tire levers.


    In PA they punch a hole in your license upon expiry when they give you your renewed license. It's still considered legal ID so I ran a key ring through it and added a house key and tucked it in the pocket inside the seat bag. The money is $10 for whatever and two ones and two dimes in case I get stranded and need to catch the closest bus. Bus is $1.10 so I have exact change twice. lol.

    I've sat out on the porch and watched the rain as I took my tire off, removed the tube, and then reassembled and reinstalled so that I have that comfortable.

    I know that I urgently need cycle shorts followed by pedals and shoes but being that I'm in the infancy of my addiction I must maintain restraint and pace myself. As I cleaned the bike and noticed the torque specs labeled everywhere on the bike I realized that a good purchase which should serve me well was also a 1/4" torque wrench. As my wallet is also in shock due to recent bike purchases (his/hers) I opted for a chinese click type for less than $30 total. I can already tell that I will eventually want a chain whip and cassette removal tool but I think I'll get by without it for another four hundred miles on the bike. (at current pace that is about 2-2.5 months)

    I'm also in the market for some good degreaser. I've been considering the ZEP citrus stuff at home depot but I'm also going to give a tshirt/rag with WD40 on it and floss the cassette to clean it. Being new to road I think I've got to try a few different things to see where my moneys best spent and I sure own rags and WD40. lol.

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