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-   -   Hand position (http://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/929247-hand-position.html)

deacon mark 01-09-14 05:36 PM

Hand position
 
I ride in the drops or on the hoods, but never on the tops. I am the only person who does this? BTW I live in the flatlands so going up steep grades might make a difference.

cthenn 01-09-14 05:40 PM

Can't answer your question re: "only" person who does this, but I ride on the tops on the flats when I want to just softpedal. Not so stretched out, more relaxing position. Also, I feel sorry for you, no hills...ugh where's the joy?

Jakedatc 01-09-14 05:50 PM

Nope, I don't use the tops even when i'm sitting up cruising. I use my hoods to climb steep stuff so i can get the best leverage. cruising around i will back my hands up to where it curves near the tops once in a while.

Pirkaus 01-09-14 05:51 PM

I ride the tops climbing and relaxed pace on the flat for a change of position
Pirk

Seattle Forrest 01-09-14 06:39 PM

Rarely use the tops, except going uphill or occasionally to move around on a long ride. When I'm in the city, I like being able to access the brakes as quickly as possible.

rpenmanparker 01-09-14 06:43 PM

1/2 tops, 1/2 hoods. Almost never drops. All flat. And BTW there is plenty of joy on the flats. I can't stand hills. I would rather headwind. All what you get used to. Go figure.

Ghazmh 01-09-14 07:02 PM

Drop, hoods or aero bars. When I replaced the bar grip I bunched it kind thick for added comfort. The grip ends at the curve to the top of my bars.

Slackerprince 01-09-14 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rpenmanparker (Post 16397676)
1/2 tops, 1/2 hoods. Almost never drops. All flat. And BTW there is plenty of joy on the flats. I can't stand hills. I would rather headwind. All what you get used to. Go figure.

Are you in Florida?


S

coasting 01-09-14 10:24 PM

nothing wrong with the tops.

rpenmanparker 01-10-14 06:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Slackerprince (Post 16398200)
Are you in Florida?


S

Nah, Houston, TX where, to paraphrase Archie Bell and the Drells, we bike most as good as we walk. Seriously, a good, long railroad overpass is the closest thing to a hill for about 50 miles. It can get pretty interesting on the way up to Austin, but that is nowhere near here.

Robert

Campag4life 01-10-14 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deacon mark (Post 16397500)
I ride in the drops or on the hoods, but never on the tops. I am the only person who does this? BTW I live in the flatlands so going up steep grades might make a difference.

I use all positions and as it turns out, bar position is really a compromise between all three...some positions maybe better than others for you.
For example I determine my saddle to handlebar drop by my body position in the hooks. This maybe more or less optimal for the hoods and/or tops.

Clipped_in 01-10-14 08:33 AM

I ride the tops for climbing, sometimes just cruising, bumpy rough roads, and when I want a very aero TT position. For the latter I slide back on the saddle, bring the elbows in, grab the tops next to the stem and "dial it up to 400 watts"!:rolleyes: For me, this is a really good aero position when just cranking it up on relatively flat roads. It's not unlike an aero tuck on a TT bike, just moved back and bunched up a bit.

http://blog.training4cyclist.netdna-...y_martin-1.jpg

Bob Dopolina 01-10-14 09:48 AM

I ride mostly on the tops, then the hoods with elbows dropped and pushed in with a flat back for extended speedy bits. The drops are for uber fast aggressive stuff.

Seated climbing is the tops. Climbing out of the saddle is for the hoods.

Winning solo is hands in the air blowing kisses (in case you were wondering).

Clipped_in 01-10-14 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Dopolina (Post 16399046)
Winning solo is hands in the air blowing kisses (in case you were wondering).

I have'nt used that position too much...

Looigi 01-10-14 10:19 AM

How high and what's the reach to your bars? If they're high and close, the tops may not be that appropriate. If they're low and forward then the tops may become more useful. A typical performance oriented setup has the bars low and forward to lower the torso and decrease drag when on the hoods and even more so in the drops.

dmcdam 01-10-14 10:52 AM

If I'm riding in the tops it means either I'm really puffing and looking for a rest, or my back is looking for a change of position on a long ride. Both happen fairly often.

coasting 01-10-14 10:58 AM

i m on tops more than half the time.

Campag4life 01-10-14 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Dopolina (Post 16399046)
I ride mostly on the tops, then the hoods with elbows dropped and pushed in with a flat back for extended speedy bits. The drops are for uber fast aggressive stuff.

Seated climbing is the tops. Climbing out of the saddle is for the hoods.

Winning solo is hands in the air blowing kisses (in case you were wondering).

Your post as an experienced cyclist really underscores how we are different. I too have been riding a long time. Because our priorities are different...you only use your drops for extreme efforts and I ride in the drops 50% of time when cruising or hammering on the flats, we likely set up handlebar much different. No doubt mine is higher to make the drops more usable.
So OP the point is, you have to go with your preferences at the end of the day. On common link between Bob and I is we both like to cruise on the tops with elbows in...including fast flat riding. But....I no doubt use the hoods and drops a lot more based upon what Bob wrote. YMMV is the point.

TexMac 01-10-14 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rpenmanparker (Post 16398656)
Nah, Houston, TX where, to paraphrase Archie Bell and the Drells, we bike most as good as we walk. Seriously, a good, long railroad overpass is the closest thing to a hill for about 50 miles. It can get pretty interesting on the way up to Austin, but that is nowhere near here.

Robert

Me too Houston, tx but the wind sometimes is brutal like climbing.

TexMac 01-10-14 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clipped_in (Post 16398827)
I ride the tops for climbing, sometimes just cruising, bumpy rough roads, and when I want a very aero TT position. For the latter I slide back on the saddle, bring the elbows in, grab the tops next to the stem and "dial it up to 400 watts"!:rolleyes: For me, this is a really good aero position when just cranking it up on relatively flat roads. It's not unlike an aero tuck on a TT bike, just moved back and bunched up a bit.

http://blog.training4cyclist.netdna-...y_martin-1.jpg

I"m trying to learn how to place my hands on my road bikes handlebar like e TT bike and always get afraid of crashing.

Campag4life 01-10-14 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TexMac (Post 16400023)
I"m trying to learn how to place my hands on my road bikes handlebar like e TT bike and always get afraid of crashing.

Key there is to set your bar height to agree with your flexibility. If you watch pros, they literally melt to the handlebar in that position. There isn't any tension and its a pretty secure position. If you lack flexibility and your bar is placed too low, this will be an awkward if not unsafe position.
Lack of flexibility creates too much tension if trying to ride in too low a position which affects not only power production but unsafe steering.
If you want to confirm this, raise your handlebar with a riser stem and then try the TT position.
Hope this makes sense.

rpenmanparker 01-10-14 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TexMac (Post 16400019)
Me too Houston, tx but the wind sometimes is brutal like climbing.

That's true, but you never have to worry about stopping on an upgrade and not being able to get started again before you fall over due to the slope. Heck, who am I kidding? I don't like the wind either! :)

TexMac 01-10-14 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Campag4life (Post 16400076)
Key there is to set your bar height to agree with your flexibility. If you watch pros, they literally melt to the handlebar in that position. There isn't any tension and its a pretty secure position. If you lack flexibility and your bar is placed too low, this will be an awkward if not unsafe position.
Lack of flexibility creates too much tension if trying to ride in too low a position which affects not only power production but unsafe steering.
If you want to confirm this, raise your handlebar with a riser stem and then try the TT position.
Hope this makes sense.

Makes a lot of sense.
My handle bar is low so thats an issue.
The other day I was at our gym and was on an ergonomic bike, found myself enjoying my hands on TT position so much that i ended up cycling for 2 hours till i was getting dizzy.


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